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DA-13-330A2

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ATTACHMENT 1

to FCC Public Notice DA 13-330

Recommendations presented at

7 March 2013 Meeting of
the Advisory Committee for
the 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference




1











Maritime Aeronautical and Radar Services





2

Document WAC/037(07.03.13)


PROPOSED EDITS TO NTIA PRELIMINARY VIEW ON WRC-15 AI 1.13

(REF. WAC/032(07.03.13))



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE



Agenda Item 1.13

: to review No. 5.268 with a view to examining the possibility for increasing the 5 km
distance limitation and allowing space research service (space-to-space) use for proximity operations by
space vehicles communicating with an orbiting manned space vehicle, in accordance with Resolution 652
(WRC 12)



Background Information
: WARC-92 allocated the band 410-420 MHz to the space research service
(SRS) on a secondary basis for extra-vehicular activity (EVA) communications in the immediate vicinity
of low earth orbit (LEO) manned space vehicles, and limited the use of the band by the SRS to EVA
operation within 5 kilometers (km) of orbiting manned space vehicles. WRC-97 upgraded the allocation
to the SRS in the band 410-420 MHz to primary status and No. 5.268 specified a set of power flux-
density (pfd) limits to ensure protection of the fixed and mobile services while retaining the 5 km distance
limitation for EVA operation.

Resolution 652 (WRC-12), recognizing c, states that “power flux-density (pfd) limits contained in
No. 5.268 ensure the protection of terrestrial stations operating in the fixed and mobile services
independent of the distance from, or the source of, space-to-space communications in the SRS.” Also,
long-term space exploration objectives require new activities around a manned space station other than
EVA, such as visiting vehicles for crew transportation/cargo re-supply and free-fly proximity vehicles for
inspection and maintenance. These vehicles need to initiate communication over distances greater than 5
km to ensure proper vehicle positioning, data exchange and system monitoring. ITU-R sharing studies
within Working Party 7B demonstrate that communication links for a variety of space vehicles other than
EVA can meet the pfd limits in No. 5.268 for distances beyond 5 km by using different modulation,
spreading technologies, and power control schemes (7B/88 Annex 1, Preliminary Draft New Report ITU-
R SA.[Proximity operations] - “Sharing conditions between space research service proximity operations
links and fixed and mobile service links in the 410-420 MHz band).

Therefore, it is necessary to modify No. 5.268 to remove both the 5 km distance limitation and restriction
to EVA operation while maintaining the pfd limits. Removal of these two restrictions will allow for
greater flexibility in using the band 410-420 MHz for space research activities while maintaining
protection of the terrestrial services.


3

Proposal

:

MOD

USA/AI 1.13/1

5.268
Use of the band 410-420 MHz by the space research service is limited to space-to-
space communications with within 5 km of an orbiting, manned space vehicle. The power flux-
density at the surface of the Earth produced by emissions from stations of extra-vehicular
activities the space research service (space-to-space) in the band 410-420 MHz shall not exceed
–153 dB(W/m2) for 0    5, 153  0.077 ( – 5) dB(W/m2) for 5    70 and –
148 dB(W/m2) for 70    , where  is the angle of arrival of the radio-frequency wave and
the reference bandwidth is 4 kHz. No. 4.10 does not apply to extra-vehicular activities. In this
frequency band the space research (space-to-space) service shall not claim protection from, nor
constrain the use and development of, stations of the fixed and mobile services. No. 4.10 does
not apply. (WRC-9715)


Reasons

: Modify No. 5.268 to remove both the 5 km distance limitation and restriction to EVA
operation while maintaining the pfd limits to protect the terrestrial services.


SUP

USA/AI 1.13/2

RESOLUTION 652 (WRC-12)

Use of the band 410-420 MHz by the space research service (space-to-space)



Reasons
: ITU-R Working Party 7B completed required studies and this resolution is no longer needed.

__________________________





4

Document WAC/038(07.03.13)


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PRELIMINARY VIEWS FOR WRC-15


Agenda Item 1.16

: to consider regulatory provisions and spectrum allocations to enable possible new
Automatic Identification System (AIS) technology applications and possible new applications to improve
maritime radiocommunication in accordance with

Resolution

360 (WRC-12);

BACKGROUND

: Automatic Identification System (AIS) is a maritime communication and safety of
navigation system operating in the VHF band and is used for vessel collision avoidance as well as the
delivery of information about specific details of the vessel. Further, consequential to the introduction of
the AIS-SART for search and rescue operations, the AIS channels were added to Appendix 15 of the
International Radio Regulations.

With increasing demand for maritime VHF data communications, AIS has become heavily used for
maritime safety, maritime situational awareness and port security. As a result, overloading of AIS1 and
AIS2 has created a need for additional AIS channels. International Maritime Organization (IMO)
Resolution MSC 74(69) required that AIS, “…improve the safety of navigation by assisting in the
efficient navigation of ships, protection of the environment, and operation of Vessel Traffic Services
(VTS), by satisfying the following functional requirements: 1) in a ship-to-ship mode for collision
avoidance; 2) as a means for littoral States to obtain information about a ship and its cargo; and 3) as a
VTS tool, i.e. ship-to-shore (traffic management)”. The International Association of Marine Aids to
Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA) has advised in its Maritime Radio Communication Plan
(MRCP) that additional AIS channels are required for ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore maritime safety
information (MSI) and general data communications (i.e. Area Warnings, Meteorological and
Hydrological Data, Channel Management of AIS, future VHF Digital Data Channels, and Ship-shore
Data Exchange).

Although satellite detection of AIS on AIS 1 and AIS 2 was proven to be possible, its effectiveness was
determined to be unacceptably limited where VDL loading is high. The need for a separate dedicated
service on separate dedicated channels was confirmed by WRC-12 and two additional channels were
designated. While this new designation solves the problem for satellite detection, AIS VDL loading
remains a serious issue to an increasing degree in many parts of the world due to the proliferation of AIS
applications, message types, services and equipment types plus the unanticipated increase in user volume.
To solve this problem and protect the integrity of the AIS VDL, AIS subject matter experts in IALA are
considering a revision to the AIS system which would move Application Specific Messages (ASM) to
two additional AIS channels. WRC-12 acknowledged this concept in its revision of Appendix 18 and
provided four candidate channels on an experimental basis for this evaluation.

There is a need for studies to address potential terrestrial and satellite communication systems, which can
provide additional Distress and Safety communication links, in the remote GMDSS Sea Area A4.




5

The United States also notes the progress at the “Workshop on International Standardization of Next
Generation AIS” (Tokyo, Japan 2012). That workshop recommended that the Next Generation AIS
should be comprised of an integrated AIS + VDE (VHF Data Exchange) and that this new hybrid should
be named VHF Data Exchange System (VDES).

U.S. VIEW

: The United States supports studies to address potential terrestrial and satellite
communication systems and also supports the completion of studies and the development of an
international standard for the prospective new VDES.

__________________________






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Terrestrial Services





7

Document WAC/034(07.03.13)


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PRELIMINARY VIEWS FOR WRC-15



Agenda Item 1.1:

to consider additional spectrum allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis
and identification of additional frequency bands for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and
related regulatory provisions, to facilitate the development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications, in
accordance with Resolution 233 (WRC-12)

BACKGROUND

: Proposals have been introduced in WP 5D specifying frequency ranges between 1000
and 1700 MHz as suitable for IMT/ mobile broadband. The band 1435-1525 MHz, or portions thereof,
have been included as “suitable frequency ranges” for IMT/mobile broadband applications for purposes
of initiating inter-service compatibility and sharing studies to be conducted by Joint Task Group 4-5-6-7
under 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15) Agenda Item 1.1.

The band 1435-1525 MHz has long been used for flight testing in the United States. Along with the band
2360-2390 MHz, it is in the critical path for aerospace research and development, and for certifying
aircraft to safety standards. Flight testing requires real-time data for the protection of the pilot and
aircrew, the test aircraft, and people and property on the ground. This data must be transmitted in
protected radio bands to minimize the chance of interference/interruption to critical safety
communications. In the event disaster strikes, and the aircraft is lost, the real-time data collected via radio
telemetry enables engineers to more quickly isolate the cause, and effect the completion of design
changes. Aeronautical mobile telemetry (“AMT”) spectrum also enables aerospace manufacturers to
achieve material efficiencies in their test programs. It enables a test aircraft to clear multiple test points in
a single flight.

Aerospace manufacturing is a multinational business. Manufacturing facilities are located in CITEL
nations, as well as facilities which supply essential parts and components for aircraft which undergo final
assembly in neighboring countries. Thus, it is important for our Region that access to AMT spectrum
remains assured and protected.

The international community has long protected spectrum resources (such as 1435-1525 MHz (herein
referred to as the “L-band”) and 2360-2390 MHz) dedicated for flight testing. Prior to the 2003 World
Radiocommunication Conference, the sharing possibilities between the L-band and Mobile Satellite
Service downlinks were studied intensively. Section 2.8.1.2.1(b) to the CPM Report for WRC-03
included the following:

“Studies submitted to the ITU-R show, in accordance with Recommendation ITU-R
M.1459, that GSO MSS and aeronautical mobile telemetry are fundamentally
incompatible under co-coverage scenarios, and that sharing is not feasible without
causing harmful interference to AMT operations. AMT systems use low-gain transmit
antennas (~2 dBi) and high gain (30 dBi) receive antennas. GSO MSS satellites use
extremely high gain (~40 dBi) downlink antennas and mobile earth stations use
low-gain (~2 dBi) receive antennas. This fundamental asymmetry in the competing
links precludes sharing if an MSS satellite is within line of sight of an AMT ground

8

station and exceeds the protection levels in Recommendation ITU-R M.1459.
Without meeting the protection levels in Recommendation ITU-R M.1459, GSO MSS
satellites in Region 1 and 3 visible to AMT ground stations in Region 2 will interfere
with AMT operations.”

Subsequently, WRC-03 adopted a change to Article 21, Table 21-4, which established a “pfd
fence” to protect flight test centers and ranges in substance as follows: pfd limits consistent with
Recommendation ITU-R M.1459 [-181 dB (W/m2) in 4 kHz at low elevation angles] to protect
AMT systems west of 71° W, and more relaxed levels for AMT systems operating in Alaska,
Hawaii and Puerto Rico.1

The use of the band 1435-1525 MHz for AMT systems is essential for the aerospace manufacturing
industry in the Americas. Given this fact, the prior ITU-R studies, and the protection obligations for
AMT in the Radio Regulations, it is unlikely that terrestrial broadband operations – whether from high-
powered base stations or from ubiquitously-deployed user devices – will be able to co-exist with AMT in
Region 2.

More specifically, RR 5.343 provides that “In Region 2, the use of the band 1435-1525 MHz by
the aeronautical mobile service for telemetry has priority over other uses by the mobile service.”
Moreover, the U.S. took an alternative allocation for the sub-band 1452-1492 MHz on account of
this. See RR 5.344. Within the United States, the band 1435-1525 MHz is and will remain
allocated exclusively to the mobile service for aeronautical telemetry.

U.S. VIEW:

The U.S. supports retaining the priority for aeronautical telemetry over other
mobile services in Region 2 that is provided by RR No. 5.343, noting the need for test ranges to
be free of cross-border interference. Stringent limits based on Recommendation ITU-R M.1459
remain necessary to protect AMT facilities against interfering signals. Thus, the U.S. does not
support the globally harmonized identification of the 1435-1525 MHz band for IMT.

The U.S. does not object to potential studies on the use of the 1435-1525 MHz band outside of
Region 2 for IMT, provided that the studies would include identification of measures to assure
protection of AMT, and footnote RR 5.343, for Region 2. In 2003, MSS proponents for the
1435-1525 MHz band used relaxed AMT parameters in Region 1, and attempted to apply the
sharing results to all three Regions. The U.S. is of the view that any AMT/IMT studies as well as
regulatory provisions emanating therefrom, which may be Region-specific, should not be
automatically applied to Region 2.

__________________________


1 In passing, it may be noted that Recommendation ITU-R M.1459 has been applied in the terrestrial context by the
Federal Communications Commission (co-channel sharing with medical telemetry and adjacent band
compatibility with Wireless Communications Systems). It has also been referenced in ITU-R studies on AMT
compatibility with satellite earth stations and the fixed and mobile services (Report M.2119 at page 3).

9


Document WAC/035(07.03.13)



PROPOSED EDITS TO NTIA PRELIMINARY VIEW ON WRC-15 AI 1.1

(REF. WAC/030(07.03.13))



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PRELIMINARY VIEWS FOR WRC-15


Agenda Item 1.1

: to consider additional spectrum allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis
and identification of additional frequency bands for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and
related regulatory provisions, to facilitate the development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications, in
accordance with Resolution 233 (WRC-12)

BACKGROUND

: Third- and fourth-generation advanced wireless systems provide terrestrial and
satellite-based broadband and multi-media capabilities, and represent a path for expanding broadband
capabilities and coverage areas. It is important for administrations to identify spectrum that could be
made available for terrestrial mobile broadband as administrations plan their spectrum use and as industry
plans to meet the marketplace requirements of the future. The early identification of spectrum is critical
to the timely introduction of new broadband services due to the time required to complete the reallocation
process, which could include developing service rules or sharing methods, conducting auctions, relocating
incumbent users to comparable spectrum as necessary, and the redesign of incumbent systems to
accommodate new operations.

The United States considered the entire band 1 675-1 710 MHz as a candidate for terrestrial mobile
broadband. The band 1 675-1 710 MHz includes co-primary allocations to the meteorological aids
service, the meteorological-satellite service (space-to-Earth), and an additional co-primary allocation to
the mobile service in the frequency range 1 675-1 690 MHz. The United States and other countries
operate meteorological aids in the frequency range
1 675-1 683 MHz. Meteorological aids provide data critical to the accuracy of global weather prediction
models and calibration of meteorological satellite sensor data. There is no suitable alternative for the in-
situ measurements provided by meteorological aids and loss of data would have a significant negative
impact on global weather prediction. Application of exclusion zones or other sharing mechanisms is
impractical due to the large number of fixed and transportable meteorological aids stations releasing
transmitters that drift up to 250 km while in flight.

Emergency managers and the public currently rely on information that National Oceanographic and
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites broadcast in the 1 690-1 695 MHz range. This
information includes severe weather warnings and forecasts via the Emergency Manager’s Weather
Information Network and re-broadcast data from ground-based sensors, such as flood gauges. NOAA’s
satellite command and control communications reside in the frequency range of 1 690-1 695 MHz. It is
difficult to provide alternative communications to users who do not have reliable Internet access or who
are in areas where a weather event has degraded or destroyed power or communications infrastructure.
Without the data provided by meteorological satellite transmissions, emergency managers and other users
would have to receive broadcasts through another transmission means, such as commercial satellite
10


broadcasts with an equivalent amount of reliability and availability present in current direct broadcast
transmissions. The studies concluded that mobile broadband systems are incompatible with existing
meteorological systems in the range of 1 675-1 695 MHz.

The United States determined that the range 1 695-1 710 MHz offers opportunity for mobile broadband
while minimizing disruption of meteorological operations upon which the domestic and international
public safety and weather prediction communities depend. Initial studies in the United States concluded
that the use of some geographical limitations on terrestrial mobile broadband could protect the limited
number of critical meteorological earth stations within 1 695-1 710 MHz. More recent studies resulted a
framework for sharing the band that protects incumbent meteorological operations while maximizing the
opportunity for commercial use. The framework recognizes the need to protect the operations of both the
co-channel polar orbiting satellites as well as geostationary operations in the adjacent 1675-1695 MHz
band. The framework provides for deployment of commercial operations outside of the Protection Zones
without any coordination. It also permits commercial operations within the Protection zone following a
successful coordination process concluding that such commercial operations can meet specified
conditions and will not cause harmful interference to ensure no loss of meteorological capability within
the protection zones. If coordination is unsuccessful, commercial operations will not be permitted within
the Protection Zone.

U.S. VIEW

: The United States supports studies to develop technical requirements that would allow a
primary mobile, except aeronautical mobile, allocation in the 1695-1700 MHz band, and identification for
broadband wireless systems including IMT, in the band 1 695-1 710 MHz. These studies should identify
sharing arrangements to ensure protection of existing services, namely meteorological-satellite earth
stations.

__________________________






11

Document WAC/036(07.03.13)



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PRELIMINARY VIEWS FOR WRC-15


Agenda Item 1.1

: to consider additional spectrum allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis
and identification of additional frequency bands for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and
related regulatory provisions, to facilitate the development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications, in
accordance with Resolution 233 (WRC-12)

BACKGROUND

: The World Radiocommunication Conference 2012 (WRC-12) adopted WRC-15
Agenda Item 1.1 in an effort to meet the dramatic increase in demand for mobile broadband applications.
Radio Local Area Networks (RLANs) have become an important component of broadband connectivity
for consumers and businesses. The volume of traffic over the RLAN networks is growing as it supports
local area networks as well as data offloading for mobile networks. Data traffic over RLANs is expected
to grow even more as devices such as tablets are sold that connect to the internet solely through RLANs.

The World Radiocommunication Conference-2003 (WRC-03) allocated the bands 5150-5350 MHz and
5470-5725 MHz on a primary basis to the mobile service for the implementation of wireless access
systems including RLANs, subject to Resolution 229 (Rev. WRC-12) (see No.5446A). Resolution 229
(Rev. WRC-12) establishes the regulatory, operational and technical provisions that ensure compatibility
with the primary services in the subject bands. The WRC-03 action has enabled significant growth of
RLANs while ensuring protection of other services.

RLANs have been utilized to provide local area access to the Internet for over a decade. Over that period,
RLAN technology has evolved to provide higher data rates. However, wired and wireless broadband
connections into the home or business also have increased data rates as fiber is now closer to the premise,
3G deployments are being replaced by LTE, etc. Therefore, it is crucial for RLAN technology to
continue to evolve to support these increased data rates.

The newest RLAN evolution, IEEE 802.11ac, can support higher speeds with a theoretical maximum
speed of 3.5 Gbps and actual throughputs for end users of greater than 2 Gpbs utilizing four antennas.
(Note that IEEE 802.11ac utilizing 8 antennas can support a theoretical maximum speed of 6.9 Gbps).
However, these throughputs depend on the availability of wide spectrum channels. IEEE 802.11ac will
utilize 80 to 160 MHz wide channels compared to 20-40 MHz channels utilized by today’s RLAN
technologies.

In addition to distributing local area internet traffic and providing offloading of data for mobile networks,
RLANs can also be utilized for direct device to device connectivity. For example, content can be
streamed over RLANs from a smart device to a larger screen or support data back-up directly to servers.

The increasing traffic on RLAN networks, wider channel sizes to support higher data rates, and device to
device connectivity have created a need for additional spectrum. The 5350-5470 MHz band is particularly
attractive for RLANs for several reasons:


12

 RLAN devices already operate in spectrum immediately adjacent to the 5350-5470 MHz band
(i.e.5150-5350 MHz and 5470-5725 MHz). The allocation of 5350-5470 MHz would be
relatively easy in terms of equipment cost and complexity.
 A new international allocation to the Mobile service for 5350-5470 MHz would facilitate
contiguous spectrum for RLANs, which would increase the number of non-overlapping channels
available for use. The contiguous spectrum would enable two additional 80 MHz channels as well
as one additional 160 MHz channel. (Note: the increase in channels is greater than the
corresponding increase in spectrum since a more efficient band plan could be implemented.)
 Currently, the 5350-5460MHz and 5350-5470 MHz bands are allocated to the following
services: Earth Exploration-Satellite (active), Radiolocation, Aeronautical
Radionavigation, Space Research (active), and Radionavigation. Many of these services
also operate in 5470-5725 MHz, where Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) has already
been employed to protect incumbent services.

In order to ensure protection of the existing services in the band 5350-5470 MHz, it will be important to
document the results of compatibility studies in modifications to the Resolution 229 (Rev. WRC-12) and
associated ITU-R recommendations, particularly Recommendation ITU-R M.1652-1.

U.S. VIEW

: The United States supports studies towards a possible primary allocation to the mobile
service in the 5350-5470 MHz frequency band for the implementation of wireless access systems
including radio local area networks (RLANs) and the corresponding revision of Resolution 229
(Rev.WRC-12) in order to ensure protection of the existing services. In particular, noting that the band
5350-5470 MHz falls between the two bands, 5150-5350 MHz and 5470-5725 MHz, that are subject to
Resolution 229 and that all three bands are allocated for Earth Exploration Satellite, Space Research and
Radiolocation Services on a primary basis, the United States is of the view that wireless access systems
including RLANs could likely operate under the same technical framework specified in Resolution 229
(Rev. WRC-12) in all three bands ranging from 5250-5725 MHz.


__________________________







13











Regulatory Issues




14

Document WAC/039(07.03.13)


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PRELIMINARY VIEW FOR WRC-15


Agenda Item 9.1.4

: Updating of the Radio Regulations in accordance with Resolution 67 (WRC-
12)1

BACKGROUND

:

Resolution 67 (WRC-12) notes that “the majority of agenda items for past WRCs concern
frequency allocations, currently contained in Article 5 and associated regulations,” and “that
regulatory provisions should continually be assessed in order to meet the demands of
administrations.” Studies toward possible updating, review, and possible revision of the Radio
Regulations are called for. Certain articles (1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 21, 22, 23
and 59) are exempted from this review.

Among the articles not exempted from consideration are those governing the fixed service (24),
the amateur and amateur-satellite services (25), the standard frequency and time signal service
(26), experimental stations (27), radiodetermination services (28), the radio astronomy service
(29), rules governing distress and safety communications (30 through 34, inclusive), aeronautical
services (35 through 45, inclusive), and maritime services (46 through 58). Most of this
information remains highly relevant and appropriate for retention in the Articles.

U.S. VIEW
:

It is the view of the United States that there is no compelling justification to engage in an
expansive update of the Radio Regulations, and that such an update should be avoided.
Regulations governing specific services should be maintained in the Articles absent a compelling
justification and unless otherwise agreed by WRCs.

__________________________


1 This matter has been included in the Outline of the draft CPM Report to WRC-15 and is addressed in
the Allocation of ITU-R preparatory work for WRC-15. See Administrative Circular (CA/201), Results of
the first session of the Conference Preparatory Meeting for WRC-15 (CPM15-1), at Annexes 7 and 8.

15


Document WAC/040(07.03.13)




UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PRELIMINARY VIEW FOR WRC-15


Agenda Item 9.1.2

: Studies on possible reduction of the coordination arc and technical criteria
used in application of

No. 9.41

in respect of coordination under

No. 9.7

as per Resolution 756
1
(WRC-12)

BACKGROUND

:

In Resolution 756 (WRC-12) it was recognized that the coordination arc to be used to identify
coordination requirements in the 6/4 GHz and 14/10/11/12 GHz frequency bands had been
reduced and that “further reductions in the coordination arc in these bands may be warranted”.

Accordingly resolves 2 of Resolution 756 (WRC-12) invites the ITU-R “to study whether
additional reductions in the coordination arcs in RR Appendix 5 (Rev.WRC-12) are appropriate
for the 6/4 GHz and 14/10/11/12 GHz frequency bands, and whether it is appropriate to reduce
the coordination arc in the 30/20 GHz band”.

With respect to the 6/4 GHz and 14/10/11/12 GHz frequency bands, it is noted that at WRC-12 a
number of administrations proposed that the coordination arc applicable to FSS geostationary
satellite networks in certain congested portions of the 4/6 GHz and 10/11/12/14 GHz frequency
bands be reduced from 10º to 6º in 4/6 GHz and from 9º to 5º in 10/11/12/14 GHz. These
reductions received broad support from countries from all the three ITU Regions.

The grounds for such proposal can be found in the extensive studies on the subject conducted by
Working Party 4A prior to WRC-12. Such studies were fully described in the associated
proposals to WRC-12, and virtually all of the proposals shared a rationale similar to that included
in Addendum 36 to WRC-12 Document 9 submitted by the United States. In particular, it is
noted in Addendum 36 to WRC-12 Document 9 that:


1 This matter has been included in the Outline of the draft CPM Report to WRC-15 and is addressed in the
Allocation of ITU-R preparatory work for WRC-15. See Administrative Circular (CA/201), Results of the first
session of the Conference Preparatory Meeting for WRC-15 (CPM15-1), at Annexes 7 and 8, and Addendum 1 to
CA/201.
16


“In certain portions of the 6/4 GHz band2 as well as of the 10/11/12/14 GHz band3, a new GSO
FSS satellite network is likely required to effect coordination with a large number of other
satellite networks with orbital separations in the range of 2º to 4º or even with less than 2º
separation. The need to co-exist and ensure appropriate protection to all these satellite networks
implies that coexistence with and protection of satellite networks with larger separation angles
will automatically result and coordination with such networks is actually unnecessary.
One of the consequences of this situation is that many of the coordinations triggered by the
current coordination arcs of 10º (6/4 GHz) and 9º (10/11/12/14 GHz) are never conducted
because neither of the parties involved feels an actual need for it to be done. The burden of
having to conduct coordination with satellite networks which are closer to the incoming network
is already heavy enough to discourage operators and administrations to devote scarce resources
to conduct coordination exercises that are clearly unnecessary.”

Although agreeing to a reduction of the coordination arc, WRC-12 did not go as far as proposed
by the United States, or other administrations. Instead, WRC-12 approved a reduction from 10º
to 8º in 4/6 GHz and from 9º to 7º in 10/11/12/14 GHz.

The points raised in the proposals to WRC-12 for a larger reduction will be even more valid in
2015 than they were in 2012 because congestion in the frequency ranges under consideration
continues to grow.


U.S. VIEW
:

It is the view of the United States that the coordination arc applicable to FSS geostationary
satellite networks in certain congested portions of the 4/6 GHz and 10/11/12/14 GHz frequency
bands be reduced from 8º to 6º in 4/6 GHz and from 7º to 5º in 10/11/12/14 GHz.

__________________________







2 3 400-4 200 MHz (space-to-Earth), 5 725-5 850 MHz (Earth-to-space) in Region 1, 5 850-6 725 MHz (Earth-to-
space), 7 025-7 075 MHz (space-to-Earth) and (Earth-to-space).
3 10.95-11.2 GHz (space-to-Earth), 11.45-11.7 GHz (space-to-Earth), 11.7-12.2 GHz (space-to-Earth) in Region 2,
12.2-12.5 GHz (space-to-Earth) in Region 3, 12.5-12.75 GHz (space-to-Earth) in Regions 1 and 3, 12.7-12.75 GHz
(Earth-to-space) in Region 2, and 13.75-14.5 GHz (Earth-to-space).

17

Document WAC/041(07.03.13)


PROPOSED EDITS TO NTIA PRELIMINARY VIEW ON WRC-15 AI 9.1.8

(REF. WAC/033(07.03.13))



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PRELIMINARY VIEWS FOR WRC-15



Agenda Item 9.1.8
: to consider and approve the Report of the Director of the Radiocommunication
Bureau, in accordance with Article 7 of the Convention:
9.1: on the activities of the Radiocommunication Sector since WRC-12

Section 9.1.8 of the CPM Report

: Resolution 757 (WRC-12) Regulatory aspects for nanosatellites and
picosatellites

BACKGROUND

: WRC-12 adopted Resolution 757 (WRC-12) which resolves to invite WRC-18 to
consider whether modifications to the regulatory procedures for notifying satellite networks are needed to
facilitate the deployment and operation of nanosatellites and picosatellites, and to take appropriate
actions. Resolution 757 (WRC-12) further invites ITU-R studies to examine the procedures for notifying
space networks and consider modifications to enable the deployment and operation of nanosatellites and
picosatellites, taking into account the satellites’ short development time, short mission time, and unique
orbital characteristics. Resolution 757 (WRC-12) recognizes that the missions of some nanosatellites and
picosatellites are potentially inconsistent with the services in which they operate and/or have limited orbit
control capabilities. The Resolution also instructs the Director of the Radiocommunication Bureau to
report to WRC-15 on the results of these studies.

The regulatory procedures for notifying frequency assignments to satellite networks in unplanned bands
apply to all satellite networks and systems in order to avoid causing or receiving harmful interference.
Consistent with Resolution 757 (WRC-12), and in response to Question ITU-R 254/7, ITU-R Working
Party 7B, in response to Question ITU-R 254/7, is developing a Draft New Report on technical and
operational characteristics of nanosatellites and picosatellites,. which is expected to provide useful
information on these types of satellites. Currently, Resolution 757 (WRC-12) provides the only direct
recognition of nanosatellites and picosatellites in the Radio Regulations. Consistent with Resolution 757
(WRC-12)
, the ITU-R is to examine the procedures for notifying space networks and consider possible
modifications to enable the deployment and operation of nanosatellites and picosatellites, taking into
account the short development time, short mission time, and unique orbital characteristics. The
Resolution also instructs the Director of the Radiocommunication Bureau to report to WRC-15 on the
results of these studies.


18

U.S. VIEW

: The United States supports completing the studies to characterize nanosatellites and
picosatellites and examining the notification procedures for space networks with respect to whether
modifications are needed to enable the deployment and operation of these satellites. The studies should
include exploration of whether the applicable regulations and procedures ensure that the operation of
nanosatellites and picosatellites does not cause harmful interference to other space networks. Based on
the results of the studies, WRC-15 should, if appropriate, modify or delete the related preliminary WRC-
18 agenda item.

__________________________





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