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DA-13-330A3

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ATTACHMENT 2

to FCC Public Notice DA 13-330

Draft Proposals formulated and approved within the National Telecommunications and

Information Administration:





1


Document WAC/029(07.03.13)



Ms. Mindel De La Torre
Chief of the International Bureau
Federal Communications Commission
445 12th Street SW
Washington, DC 20554

Dear Ms. De La Torre:

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) on behalf of the Executive
Branch agencies, approves the release of the attached Executive Branch preliminary view for WRC-15.
The enclosed draft preliminary view addresses agenda item 1.4 (secondary amateur HF allocation) in the
5250-5450 kHz range.

This draft preliminary view considers the federal agency inputs toward the development of U.S. proposals
for WRC-15. NTIA forwards this package for your consideration and review by your WRC-15 Advisory
Committee. Dr. Darlene Drazenovich is the primary contact from my staff.

Sincerely,

(Original Signed October 4, 2012)

Karl B. Nebbia
Associate Administrator
Office of Spectrum Management
Enclosure











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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PRELIMINARY VIEWS FOR WRC-15


Agenda Item 1.4

: to consider possible new allocation to the amateur service on a secondary basis within
the band 5 250-5 450 kHz in accordance with Resolution 649 (WRC-12)

BACKGROUND

: Incumbent services in the 5 250-5 450 kHz range include the fixed, mobile (except
aeronautical mobile), and radiolocation1 services. Experience has shown that amateur service operation is
incompatible with HF radiolocation; thus, the 5 250-5 275 kHz range is not suitable to satisfy this agenda
item. Some administrations, including the United States, have permitted amateur service licensees
privileges within the 5 275-5 450 kHz range under Radio Regulations No. 4.4, in some cases permitting
operation on discrete channels, and in other cases permitting access to a frequency band. These amateur
operations are typically limited to lower power levels (i.e., 100 watts effective isotropic radiated power).
In some cases, these amateur operations are restricted to specific emission designators (i.e., 2K80J3E,
2K80J2D, 60HOJ2B and 150HA1A).

U.S. VIEW

: If ITU-R studies demonstrate compatibility with incumbent services, the United States will
consider supporting a secondary allocation of up to 15 kHz to the amateur service within the 5 275-5 450
kHz range. Contiguous spectrum is not a requirement for amateur operations in the band. Sharing studies
should consider non-contiguous, discreet allocations as well as listen-before-transmit protocols to provide
additional protection for the primary services.



1 The allocation to the radiolocation service is in the band 5 250-5 275 kHz and comes into force on 1 January 2013.
3


Document WAC/030(07.03.13)




Ms. Mindel De La Torre
Chief of the International Bureau
Federal Communications Commission
445 12th Street SW
Washington, DC 20554

Dear Ms. De La Torre:

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) on behalf of the Executive
Branch agencies, approves the release of the attached Executive Branch preliminary view for WRC-15.
The enclosed draft preliminary view addresses agenda item 1.1 to consider additional spectrum
allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis and identification of additional frequency bands for
International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and related regulatory provisions, to facilitate the
development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications, in accordance with Resolution 233 (WRC-12)
for the band 1695-1710 MHz.

This draft preliminary view considers the federal agency inputs toward the development of U.S. proposals
for WRC-15. NTIA forwards this package for your consideration and review by your WRC-15 Advisory
Committee. Dr. Darlene Drazenovich is the primary contact from my staff.

Sincerely,

(Original Signed January 30, 2013)

Karl B. Nebbia
Associate Administrator
Office of Spectrum Management
Enclosure











4


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PRELIMINARY VIEWS FOR WRC-15


Agenda Item 1.1

: to consider additional spectrum allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis
and identification of additional frequency bands for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and
related regulatory provisions, to facilitate the development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications, in
accordance with Resolution 233 (WRC-12)

BACKGROUND

: Third- and fourth-generation advanced wireless systems provide terrestrial and
satellite-based broadband and multi-media capabilities, and represent a path for expanding broadband
capabilities and coverage areas. It is important for administrations to identify spectrum that could be
made available for terrestrial mobile broadband as administrations plan their spectrum use and as industry
plans to meet the marketplace requirements of the future. The early identification of spectrum is critical
to the timely introduction of new broadband services due to the time required to complete the reallocation
process, which could include developing service rules or sharing methods, conducting auctions, relocating
incumbent users to comparable spectrum as necessary, and the redesign of incumbent systems to
accommodate new operations.

The United States considered the entire band 1 675-1 710 MHz as a candidate for terrestrial mobile
broadband. The band 1 675-1 710 MHz includes co-primary allocations to the meteorological aids
service, the meteorological-satellite service (space-to-Earth), and an additional co-primary allocation to
the mobile service in the frequency range 1 675-1 690 MHz. The United States and other countries
operate meteorological aids in the frequency range
1 675-1 683 MHz. Meteorological aids provide data critical to the accuracy of global weather prediction
models and calibration of meteorological satellite sensor data. There is no suitable alternative for the in-
situ measurements provided by meteorological aids and loss of data would have a significant negative
impact on global weather prediction. Application of exclusion zones or other sharing mechanisms is
impractical due to the large number of fixed and transportable meteorological aids stations releasing
transmitters that drift up to 250 km while in flight.

Emergency managers and the public currently rely on information that National Oceanographic and
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites broadcast in the 1 690-1 695 MHz range. This
information includes severe weather warnings and forecasts via the Emergency Manager’s Weather
Information Network and re-broadcast data from ground-based sensors, such as flood gauges. NOAA’s
satellite command and control communications reside in the frequency range of 1 690-1 695 MHz. It is
difficult to provide alternative communications to users who do not have reliable Internet access or who
are in areas where a weather event has degraded or destroyed power or communications infrastructure.
Without the data provided by meteorological satellite transmissions, emergency managers and other users
would have to receive broadcasts through another transmission means, such as commercial satellite
broadcasts with an equivalent amount of reliability and availability present in current direct broadcast
transmissions. The studies concluded that mobile broadband systems are incompatible with existing
meteorological systems in the range of 1 675-1 695 MHz.

The United States determined that the range 1 695-1 710 MHz offers opportunity for mobile broadband
while minimizing disruption of meteorological operations upon which the domestic and international
public safety and weather prediction communities depend. Initial studies concluded that the use of some
geographical limitations on terrestrial mobile broadband could protect the limited number of critical
meteorological earth stations within 1 695-1 710 MHz.

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U.S. VIEW

: The United States supports studies to develop technical requirements that would allow a
primary mobile allocation, and identification for broadband wireless systems including IMT, in the band 1
695-1 710 MHz. These studies should identify sharing arrangements to ensure protection of existing
services, namely meteorological-satellite earth stations.


6


Document WAC/032(07.03.13)



Ms. Mindel De La Torre
Chief of the International Bureau
Federal Communications Commission
445 12th Street SW
Washington, DC 20554

Dear Ms. De La Torre:

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) on behalf of the Executive
Branch agencies, approves the release of the draft Executive Branch proposals for WRC-15 agenda items
7 (No. 11.49) and 1.13. For agenda item 7, NTIA proposes to add regulatory procedures when
administrations notify the Bureau of suspension beyond the initial six-month period. For agenda item
1.13, NTIA proposes to modify No. 5.268 by removing both the 5 km distance limitation and the
restriction to EVA operation.

NTIA considered the federal agencies’ input toward the development of U.S. proposals for WRC-15.
NTIA forwards this package for your consideration and review by your WRC-15 Advisory Committee.
Dr. Darlene Drazenovich is the primary contact from my staff.

Sincerely,

(Original Signed February 14, 2013)

Karl B. Nebbia
Associate Administrator
Office of Spectrum Management













7


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE


Agenda Item 7
: to consider possible changes, and other options, in response to Resolution 86 (rev.
Marrakesh, 2002) of the Plenipotentiary Conference, an advance publication, coordination, notification
and recording procedures for frequency assignments pertaining to satellite networks, in accordance with
Resolution 86 (Rev. WRC-07) to facilitate rational efficient, and economical use of radio frequencies and
any associated orbits, including the geostationary –satellite orbit


Background Information
: WRC-12 modified No. 11.49 to expand the time an administration is allowed
to suspend the assignment to a space station from a two-year time period to three years. In addition, the
administration does not need to notify the Bureau of the suspension during the first six months of the date
the assignment was suspended as long as the assignment is brought back into use before the end of the
six-month period. However, if the suspension lasts longer than six months, the administration must notify
the Bureau of the suspension and then follow the procedures for bringing the assignment back into use
within the three-year suspension period. Because of time constraints at WRC-12, the conference did not
include regulatory procedures for the mechanics of when an administration notifies the Bureau of a
suspension extending beyond the initial six-month period. Because of this omission, the Bureau proposed
a Rule of Procedure (RoP) that would have cancelled the assignment if the Bureau did not receive a
notification of the suspension before or at the end of the six-month period. On the other hand, the Bureau
cancelling a frequency assignment due to late notification beyond six months may be inconsistent with
the WRC-12 decision for administrations to have a maximum of three years from the suspension date to
resume use of their frequency assignments. As a result, the Radio Regulations Board did not include
cancellation of an assignment for a late suspended use notification in the adopted Rules of Procedure.

This proposal supports administrations notifying the Bureau if a suspension is greater than six months but
provides an incentive to administrations to notify the Bureau as soon as it can before the six-month period
to avoid any possible reduction in the three-year suspension time. If an administration notifies the Bureau
of a suspension beyond the initial six-month period, then the Bureau will reduce the amount of time over
the six-month period from the three-year period. As an example, notifying the Bureau of a suspension at
the seven-month point (notification date of suspension) will reduce the suspension period from the date
the assignment was suspended (assignment suspension date) to 2 years and ten months (three years minus
a penalty of two times one month for the one month late notification). As a result, an administration will
only have a maximum of 2 years and four months to bring the assignment back into use from the
notification date of suspension.


8



Proposal

:

MOD

USA/AI
7/1


11.49
Wherever the use of a recorded frequency assignment to a space station is suspended for
a period exceeding six months, the notifying administration shall, as soon as possible, but preferably not
later than six months from the date on which the use was suspended, inform the Bureau of the date on
which such use was suspended. When the recorded assignment is brought back into use, the notifying
administration shall, subject to the provisions of No. 11.49.1 when applicable, so inform the Bureau, as
soon as possible. The date on which the recorded assignment is brought back into use22 shall be not later
than three years from the date on which the use of the assignment was suspended. If the notifying
administration informs the Bureau of the suspension more than six months after the date on which the use
of the assignment was suspended, this three-year time period shall be reduced by double the time period
beyond six months the notifying administration informed the Bureau from the date of the
suspension. (WRC-1215)

Reasons

: To add regulatory procedures when an administration notifies the Bureau of a suspension
beyond the initial six-month period.


























9




UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE



Agenda Item 1.13

: to review No. 5.268 with a view to examining the possibility for increasing the 5 km
distance limitation and allowing space research service (space-to-space) use for proximity operations by
space vehicles communicating with an orbiting manned space vehicle, in accordance with Resolution 652
(WRC 12)



Background Information
: WARC-92 allocated the band 410-420 MHz to the space research service
(SRS) on a secondary basis for extra-vehicular activity (EVA) communications in the immediate vicinity
of low earth orbit (LEO) manned space vehicles, and limited the use of the band by the SRS to EVA
operation within 5 kilometers (km) of orbiting manned space vehicles. WRC-97 upgraded the allocation
to the SRS in the band 410-420 MHz to primary status and No. 5.268 specified a set of power flux-
density (pfd) limits to ensure protection of the fixed and mobile services while retaining the 5 km distance
limitation for EVA operation.

Resolution 652 (WRC-12), recognizing c, states that “power flux-density (pfd) limits contained in
No. 5.268 ensure the protection of terrestrial stations operating in the fixed and mobile services
independent of the distance from, or the source of, space-to-space communications in the SRS.” Also,
long-term space exploration objectives require new activities around a manned space station other than
EVA, such as visiting vehicles for crew transportation/cargo re-supply and free-fly proximity vehicles for
inspection and maintenance. These vehicles need to initiate communication over distances greater than 5
km to ensure proper vehicle positioning, data exchange and system monitoring. ITU-R sharing studies
within Working Party 7B demonstrate that communication links for a variety of space vehicles other than
EVA can meet the pfd limits in No. 5.268 for distances beyond 5 km by using different modulation,
spreading technologies, and power control schemes (7B/88 Annex 1, Preliminary Draft New Report ITU-
R SA.[Proximity operations] - “Sharing conditions between space research service proximity operations
links and fixed and mobile service links in the 410-420 MHz band).

Therefore, it is necessary to modify No. 5.268 to remove both the 5 km distance limitation and restriction
to EVA operation while maintaining the pfd limits. Removal of these two restrictions will allow for
greater flexibility in using the band 410-420 MHz for space research activities while maintaining
protection of the terrestrial services.

Proposal

:

MOD

USA/AI 1.13/1

5.268
Use of the band 410-420 MHz by the space research service is limited to space-to-
space communications with within 5 km of an orbiting, manned space vehicle. The power flux-
density at the surface of the Earth produced by emissions from stations of extra-vehicular
activities the space research service (space-to-space) in the band 410-420 MHz shall not exceed
–153 dB(W/m2) for 0    5, 153  0.077 ( – 5) dB(W/m2) for 5    70 and –
10


148 dB(W/m2) for 70    , where  is the angle of arrival of the radio-frequency wave and
the reference bandwidth is 4 kHz. No. 4.10 does not apply to extra-vehicular activities. In this
frequency band the space research (space-to-space) service shall not claim protection from, nor
constrain the use and development of, stations of the fixed and mobile services. No. 4.10 does
not apply. (WRC-9715)


Reasons

: Modify No. 5.268 to remove both the 5 km distance limitation and restriction to EVA
operation while maintaining the pfd limits to protect the terrestrial services.


SUP

USA/AI 1.13/2

RESOLUTION 652 (WRC-12)

Use of the band 410-420 MHz by the space research service (space-to-space)



Reasons
: ITU-R Working Party 7B completed required studies and this resolution is no longer needed.


11


Document WAC/033(07.03.13)



Ms. Mindel De La Torre
Chief of the International Bureau
Federal Communications Commission
445 12th Street SW
Washington, DC 20554

Dear Ms. De La Torre:

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) on behalf of the Executive
Branch agencies, approves the release of the draft Executive Branch preliminary view for WRC-15
agenda item 9.1.8 (nanosateliltes/picosatellites).

This draft preliminary view considers the federal agency inputs toward the development of U.S. proposals
for WRC-15. NTIA forwards this package for your consideration and review by your WRC-15 Advisory
Committee. Dr. Darlene Drazenovich is the primary contact from my staff.

Sincerely,

(Original Signed February 15, 2013)

Karl B. Nebbia
Associate Administrator
Office of Spectrum Management













12


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


DRAFT PRELIMINARY VIEWS FOR WRC-15



Agenda Item 9
: to consider and approve the Report of the Director of the Radiocommunication Bureau,
in accordance with Article 7 of the Convention:
9.1: on the activities of the Radiocommunication Sector since WRC-12

Section 9.1.8 of the CPM Report

: Resolution 757 (WRC-12) Regulatory aspects for nanosatellites and
picosatellites

BACKGROUND

: WRC-12 adopted Resolution 757 (WRC-12) which resolves to invite WRC-18 to
consider whether modifications to the regulatory procedures for notifying satellite networks are needed to
facilitate the deployment and operation of nanosatellites and picosatellites, and to take appropriate
actions. The regulatory procedures for notifying satellite networks apply to all satellite networks and
systems in order to avoid causing or receiving harmful interference.

ITU-R Working Party 7B, in response to Question ITU-R 254/7, is developing a Draft New Report on
technical and operational characteristics of nanosatellites and picosatellites. Currently, Resolution 757
(WRC-12) provides the only direct recognition of nanosatellites and picosatellites in the Radio
Regulations. Consistent with Resolution 757 (WRC-12), the ITU-R is to examine the procedures for
notifying space networks and consider possible modifications to enable the deployment and operation of
nanosatellites and picosatellites, taking into account the short development time, short mission time, and
unique orbital characteristics. The Resolution also instructs the Director of the Radiocommunication
Bureau to report to WRC-15 on the results of these studies.

U.S. VIEW

: The United States supports completing the studies to characterize nanosatellites and
picosatellites and examining the notification procedures for space networks with respect to the
deployment and operation of these satellites. Based on the results of the studies, WRC-15 should if
appropriate, modify the related WRC-18 agenda item.





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