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DA-14-1248A3

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ATTACHMENT B

to FCC Public Notice DA 14-1248

Draft Proposals formulated and approved within the National Telecommunications and

Information Administration:

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WAC/076(27.08.14)

Ms. Mindel De La Torre

Chief of the International Bureau

Federal Communications Commission

445 12th Street SW

Washington, DC 20554

Dear Ms. De La Torre:

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) on behalf of the Executive

Branch agencies, approves the release of the draft Executive Branch proposal for WRC-15 agenda item

1.1 and 1.4. NTIA proposes no change to the band 3700-4200 MHz and no change to 6425 MHz and

above on agenda item 1.1. NTIA also proposes no change to band 5250-5450 kHz on agenda item 1.4.

NTIA considered the federal agencies’ input toward the development of U.S. proposals for WRC-15.

NTIA forwards this package for your consideration and review by your WRC-15 Advisory Committee.

Mr. Scott Kotler is the primary contact from my staff.

Sincerely,

(Original Signed February 21, 2014)

Karl B. Nebbia

Associate Administrator

Office of Spectrum Management

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

DRAFT PROPOSAL FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE

Agenda Item 1.1: to consider additional spectrum allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis and

identification of additional frequency bands for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and related

regulatory provisions, to facilitate the development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications, in

accordance with Resolution 233 (WRC-12)

Background Information: WRC-15 will consider additional allocations to the mobile service (MS) on a

primary basis and identification of additional frequency bands for IMT based on the results of ITU-R sharing

and compatibility studies.

Proposals have been introduced in the JTG 4-5-6-7 supporting identification of the 3 700 – 4 200 MHz

frequency band for IMT. The band has been identified as a “suitable frequency range” for purposes of

initiating inter-service compatibility and sharing studies to be conducted by Joint Task Group 4-5-6-7 under

2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15) Agenda Item 1.1.

The 3 600 – 4 200 MHz band is allocated to the fixed-satellite service (FSS) (space-to-Earth) and fixed

service on a co-primary basis in Region 1, with a secondary mobile service allocation. In addition, the 3 700

– 4 200 MHz band is allocated on a co-primary basis to FSS (space-to-Earth), fixed and mobile (except

aeronautical mobile) services in both Regions 2 and 3.

As detailed in Report ITU-R M.2109 (2007), previous compatibility studies, carried out prior to WRC-07,

have determined that IMT and IMT-Advanced services operating in 3 700 – 4 200 MHz would not be

compatible with existing FSS operations in the band.1 This band is employed by major C-band satellite

services that provide important international communications capabilities in most regions of the world. To

date, no studies indicate the possibility of compatibility between IMT services and these important satellite

uses. Therefore, the United States proposes no change to RR Article 5 Table of Frequency Allocations for the

band 3 700 – 4 200 MHz.

1 See Report ITU-R M.2109, Sharing studies between IMT-Advanced systems and geostationarysatellite networks in

the fixed-satellite service in the 3 400-4 200 and 4 500-4 800 MHz frequency bands (2007)

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Proposal:

ARTICLE 5

Frequency allocations

Section IV – Table of Frequency Allocations

(See No. 2.1)

NOC USA/1.1/X

2 700-4 800 MHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

...

3 600-4 200

...

...

FIXED

FIXED-SATELLITE

(space-to-Earth)

Mobile

3 700-4 200

FIXED

FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)

MOBILE except aeronautical mobile

...

Reason: Any modifications to the 3 700 – 4 200 MHz band may place unacceptable constraints on the fixed-

satellite service operations in the band.

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

DRAFT PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE

Agenda item 1.1: to consider additional spectrum allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis

and identification of additional frequency bands for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and

related regulatory provisions, to facilitate the development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications,

in accordance with Resolution 233 (WRC-12);

Background Information: Conference Preparatory Meeting (CPM) 15-1 established a dedicated Joint

Task Group (JTG 4-5-6-7) to address issues related to WRC-15 Agenda items 1.1 and 1.2. JTG 4-5-6-7 is

responsible for developing draft CPM text and performing associated studies in accordance with the

provisions of Resolution 233 (WRC-12) regarding Agenda item 1.1. As part of its terms of reference,

JTG 4-5-6-7 is to consider the results of studies from Working Party 5D on spectrum requirements for the

mobile service, including suitable frequency ranges for IMT, from which JTG 4-5-6-7 is to conduct

sharing studies for purposes of developing CPM text. In Document 4-5-6-7/220, “Final input to Joint

Task Group 4-5-6-7 on suitable frequency ranges WRC-15 Agenda item 1.1”, WP5D has confirmed and

provided to JTG4-5-6-7 its final input on suitable frequency ranges for IMT, which in their sum bounds

the frequency range 410 MHz to 6 425 MHz as being suitable.

Over several meetings, WP5D discussed the suitability of frequencies above 6 425 MHz for IMT for

consideration under WRC-15 Agenda item 1.1. However, as noted in Document 4-5-6-7/220, WP5D did

not include frequencies above 6425 MHz as suitable for IMT under WRC-15 under Agenda item 1.1, as

WP5D stated that, “Working Party 5D indicated that it is continuing to consider the frequency ranges

above 6 GHz in terms of their suitability for IMT”. In addition, as noted in Document 4-5-6-7/220,

“WP5D also confirms it is continuing to study the frequency ranges above 6 GHz in the light of the

evolution of technology and services, in addition to the already acknowledged suitable frequency ranges

in the bands below 6 GHz.” In consequence, WP5D did not provide IMT system characteristics and

deployment parameters in those frequencies and no sharing studies were conducted by JTG 4-5-6-7 in any

band above 6 425 MHz between IMT systems and the existing systems or applications operating in

frequencies above 6 425 MHz. Therefore, the United States maintains that WRC-15 should not address

mobile service allocations or IMT identification in any bands above 6 425 MHz under WRC-15 Agenda

item 1.1.

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Proposal:

ARTICLE 5 

Frequency allocations

Section IV – Table of Frequency Allocations

(See No. 2.1)

NOC

USA/AI 1.1/1

5 570 -7 250 MHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

5 925 -6 700

FIXED 5.457

FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.457A 5.457B

MOBILE 5.457C

5.149 5.440 5.458

6 700-7 075

FIXED

FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) (space-to-Earth) 5.441

MOBILE

5.458 5.458A 5.458B 5.458C

. . .

248-3 000 GHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

275-3 000

(Not allocated) 5.565

Reasons: This proposal for NOC applies for 6 425 MHz and above. WP5D did not include any

frequencies above 6 425 MHz as suitable for IMT, and WP5D did not provide to JTG 4-5-6-7 IMT

system characteristics and deployment parameters in those frequencies. In consequence, no sharing

studies were conducted in JTG4-5-6-7 for any band above 6 425 MHz. Therefore, WRC-15 should not

address mobile service allocations or IMT identification in any bands above 6 425 MHz under Agenda

item 1.1.

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE

Agenda Item 1.4: to consider the possibility of making an allocation of an appropriate amount of

spectrum, not necessarily contiguous, to the amateur service on a secondary basis within the band 5 250-

5 450 kHz, in accordance with Resolution 649 (WRC-12)

Background Information: This agenda item considers the possibility of an allocation of spectrum for

the amateur service on a secondary basis in the 5 250 – 5 450 kHz band. Taking into account the

propagation characteristics of the HF band at frequencies near 5 300 kHz and existing incumbent use in

this band for disaster relief, emergencies and contingency operations, an allocation to the amateur service

in the 5 250 – 5 450 kHz band must protect incumbent services in the band

Incumbent services in the 5 250 – 5 450 kHz range include the fixed, mobile (except aeronautical

mobile), and radiolocation2 services. Experience has shown that amateur service operation is

incompatible with HF radiolocation, therefore the 5 250 – 5 275 kHz range is not suitable to satisfy this

agenda item. Existing fixed and mobile use in this band is in direct support of law enforcement, disaster

relief, emergencies, and contingency operations. Making use of this band by the amateur service is,

therefore, incompatible. Some administrations permit amateur service licensees privileges within the 5

275 – 5 450 kHz range under No. 4.4, in some cases permitting operation on discrete channels, and in

other cases permitting access to a frequency band.

Since amateur use of this band would be incompatible with existing services and incumbent use for

disaster relief, emergencies and contingency operations in the band, the United States propose no change

for the band 5 240-5 450 kHz.

Proposals:

ARTICLE 5

Frequency allocations

Section IV – Table of Frequency Allocations

(See No. 2.1)

NOC USA/AI 1.4/1

2 The allocation to the radiolocation service is in the band 5 250-5 275 kHz and comes into force on 1 January 2013.

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5 250-5 450 kHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

5 250-5 275

5 250-5 275

5 250-5 275

FIXED

FIXED

FIXED

MOBILE except aeronautical

MOBILE except aeronautical

MOBILE except aeronautical

mobile

mobile

mobile

Radiolocation 5.132A

RADIOLOCATION 5.132A

Radiolocation 5.132A

5.133A

5 275-5 450

FIXED

MOBILE except aeronautical mobile

Reasons: Experience has shown that sharing is not possible between the amateur service and the

fixed and mobile service which are heavily engaged in law enforcement, disaster relief,

emergencies and contingency operations and the radiolocation service in the HF band.

SUP USA/AI 1.4/2

RESOLUTION 649 (WRC-12)

Possible allocation to the amateur service on a secondary basis at around 5 300 kHz

Reasons: Consequential to the incompatibility of an allocation to the amateur service.

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WAC/077(27.08.14)

Ms. Mindel De La Torre

Chief of the International Bureau

Federal Communications Commission

445 12th Street SW

Washington, DC 20554

Dear Ms. De La Torre:

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) on behalf of the Executive

Branch agencies, approves the release of the draft Executive Branch proposal for WRC-15 agenda item

1.1 and 9. NTIA proposes no change to agenda item 1.1 in the bands 5010-5030 MHz and 1164-1300

MHz. NTIA also proposes no change to agenda item 9 in the band 5010-5030 MHz.

NTIA considered the federal agencies’ input toward the development of U.S. proposals for WRC-15.

NTIA forwards this package for your consideration and review by your WRC-15 Advisory Committee.

Mr. Charles Glass is the primary contact from my staff.

Sincerely,

(Original Signed June 24, 2014)

Karl B. Nebbia

Associate Administrator

Office of Spectrum Management

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

DRAFT PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE

Agenda Item 1.1: to consider additional spectrum allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis

and identification of additional frequency bands for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and

related regulatory provisions, to facilitate the development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications,

in accordance with Resolution 233 (WRC-12);

Background Information: The 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12) recognized a

need for additional radio spectrum to support the increasing mobile data traffic, and placed consideration

of additional spectrum allocations for terrestrial mobile broadband applications on the Agenda for WRC-

15. Joint Task Group (JTG) 4-5-6-7 was established to consider spectrum requirements for IMT/mobile

broadband and compatibility studies taking into account protection requirements of other services from

concerned ITU-R Working Parties.

The radionavigation-satellite service (RNSS) has allocations used for Earth-to-space operations in the 5

000-5 010 MHz band and space-to-Earth and space-to-space operations in the 5 010-5 030 MHz band.

Operators plan or currently operate several global and regional non-geostationary satellite RNSS systems,

including GPS, GLONASS, Beidou, QZSS, Galileo, IRNSS within these bands. RNSS shares its

allocations 5 000-5 010 MHz and 5 010-5 030 MHz with the aeronautical radionavigation service

(ARNS), also a safety service.

There is a long history of protecting RNSS operations in the ITU. Multiple RNSS systems and networks

transmit signals around-the-clock across all three ITU Regions and radiate across the entire surface of the

Earth. Although these RNSS allocations are in bands that have favorable propagation and other

characteristics for mobile broadband, JTG 4-5-6-7 did not study the use of these or adjacent bands. This

is indicative of the virtually universal will to protect RNSS operations on a global basis.

Due to the vital and global role of the RNSS, and lack of demonstrated in-band and adjacent band

frequency sharing compatibility, no allocation to the mobile service for IMT should be considered in the

bands 5 000-5 010 MHz or 5 010-5 030 MHz.

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Proposal:

NOC USA/1.1/1

ARTICLE 5

Frequency allocations

5 010-5 030 MHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

5 000-5 010 AERONAUTICAL MOBILE-SATELLITE (R) 5.443AA

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION

RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)

5 010-5 030 AERONAUTICAL MOBILE-SATELLITE (R) 5.443AA

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION

RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-

space) 5.328B 5.443B

Reason: To ensure the protection of current and future operation of RNSS systems around the world.

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

DRAFT PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE

Agenda Item 1.1: to consider additional spectrum allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis

and identification of additional frequency bands for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and

related regulatory provisions, to facilitate the development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications,

in accordance with Resolution 233 (WRC-12);

Background Information: The 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12) recognized a

need for additional radio spectrum to support the increasing mobile data traffic, and placed consideration

of additional spectrum allocations for terrestrial mobile broadband applications on the agenda for WRC-

15. Joint Task Group (JTG) 4-5-6-7 was established to consider spectrum requirements for IMT/mobile

broadband and compatibility studies taking into account protection requirements of other services from

concerned ITU-R Working Parties.

The radionavigation-satellite service (RNSS) has allocations used for space-to-Earth and space-to-space

systems and networks in the 1 164-1 215 MHz, 1 215-1 300 MHz and 1 559-1 610 MHz bands.

Operators plan or currently operate several global and regional non-geostationary satellite RNSS systems,

including GPS, GLONASS, Beidou, QZSS, Galileo, IRNSS, as well as a number of geostationary-orbit

satellite networks that provide space-based augmentation services within these bands. Operators deploy

RNSS receivers and applications by the hundreds of millions worldwide, and are pervasive in every facet

of everyday life. People use RNSS receivers in the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and other

safety-of-life applications for precision surveying, construction, agriculture, and mining, environmental

monitoring (including earthquake and tsunami monitoring), precision timing applications, all within many

mobile broadband devices and other handsets. RNSS shares its allocations at 1 559-1 610 MHz and,

1 164-1 215 MHz with the aeronautical radionavigation service (ARNS), also a safety service.

There is a long history of protecting RNSS operations in the ITU. Multiple RNSS systems and networks

transmit signals around-the-clock across all three ITU Regions and radiate across the entire surface of the

Earth. RNSS frequency bands thus are operational at all times in all locations on Earth. RNSS signals are

very low power, spread-spectrum signals coming from space that are difficult to detect. It takes special

processing by RNSS receivers to extract the signal from the background noise. If a high-power,

continuous in time, signal in the same frequency band, or an adjacent band, is broadcast near an RNSS

receiver, it could desensitize the RNSS receiver to the degree that the RNSS receiver is unable to extract

the RNSS signal from space.

Studies in the ITU in preparation for WRC-2000 concluded that even relatively weak continuous in time

signals from mobile-satellite service satellites in geostationary orbit would not be able to be provided on a

co-frequency basis with the RNSS and ARNS in the 1 559-1 610 MHz band. CPM-99 concluded, in

Section 2.2.1.3 of the CPM Report for WRC-2000, that “although studies were not carried out on every

different type of RNSS receiver used in all the numerous applications of RNSS, it was nevertheless

possible to conclude that sharing between ARNS/RNSS and MSS (space-to-Earth) is not feasible in any

portion of the 1 559-1 567 MHz band.” WRC-2000 agreed, and declined to add a co-primary MSS

allocation to a portion of the RNSS band. To protect RNSS in the 1 164-1 215 MHz band, WRC-12

modified Resolution 417 to include strict power limits on high-powered terrestrial transmitters in the

adjacent aeronautical radionavigation service band at 960-1 164 MHz.

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Although all the RNSS allocations are in bands that have favorable propagation and other characteristics

for mobile broadband, JTG 4-5-6-7 did not study the use of these or adjacent bands. This is indicative of

the virtually universal will to protect RNSS operations on a global basis.

Due to the vital and global role of the RNSS, and demonstrated in-band and adjacent band frequency

sharing incompatibility, no allocation to the mobile service or designation for IMT should be considered

in the bands 1 164-1 215 MHz, 1 215-1 300 MHz and 1 559-1 610 MHz. Furthermore, any proposed new

use of a band adjacent to any of these RNSS bands would need to include regulations that would ensure

that mobile broadband systems did not cause harmful interference to RNSS receivers (e.g., guard bands,

power limits, etc.).

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Proposals:

NOC USA/1.1/1

ARTICLE 5

Frequency Allocations

890-1 300 MHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

1 164-1 215

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.328

RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-

space) 5.328B

5.328A

1 215-1 240

EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)

RADIOLOCATION

RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-

space) 5.328B 5.329 5.329A

SPACE RESEARCH (active)

5.330 5.331 5.332

1 240-1 300

EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)

RADIOLOCATION

RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-

space) 5.328B 5.329 5.329A

SPACE RESEARCH (active)

Amateur

5.282 5.330 5.331 5.332 5.335 5.335A

Reason: To ensure the protection of current and future operation of RNSS systems around the world.

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NOC USA/1.1/2

ARTICLE 5

Frequency Allocations

1 525-1 610 MHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

1 559-1610

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION

RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-

space) 5.208B 5.328B 5.329A

5.314 5.362B 5.362C

Reason: To ensure the protection of current and future operation of RNSS systems around the world.

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

DRAFT PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE

Agenda Item 9: to consider and approve the Report of the Director of the Radiocommunication

Bureau, in accordance with Article 7 of the Convention; 9.1: on the activities of the Radiocommunication

Sector since WRC-12;

Background Information: RR No. 5.443C was adopted at WRC-12 in conjunction with a new AM(R)S

allocation in 5 030-5 091 MHz to enable use of unmanned aircraft systems in that band while ensuring

protection of RNSS systems and networks in the adjacent 5 010-5 030 MHz (space-to-Earth) and (space-

to-space) RNSS band. No. 5.443C states:

The use of the frequency band 5 030-5 091 MHz by the aeronautical mobile (R)

service is limited to internationally standardized aeronautical systems. Unwanted

emissions from the aeronautical mobile (R) service in the frequency band

5 030-5 091 MHz shall be limited to protect RNSS system downlinks in the

adjacent 5 010-5 030 MHz band. Until such time that an appropriate value is

established in a relevant ITU-R Recommendation, the e.i.r.p. density limit of

−75 dBW/MHz in the frequency band 5 010-5 030 MHz for any AM(R)S station

unwanted emission should be used. (WRC-12)

The BR Director’s CPM Report is very likely to reference RR No. 5.443C, since it contains the phrase,

Until such time that an appropriate value is established in a relevant ITU-R Recommendation…” In

May 2012, WP 4C began work toward finalizing the provisional e.i.r.p. density limit of −75 dBW/MHz

limit in No. 5.443C with a liaison statement to WP 5B (cf. Doc. 5B/57) and this work was reported to SG

4 (cf. Doc. 4/15). However, WP 5B (cf. Doc. 4C/104) and ICAO (cf. § 3.2, Doc. 4C/173) have

communicated that no AM(R)S transmitter characteristics are available to perform compatibility studies.

Therefore, the ITU can develop no such Recommendation at this time.

Although the USA consented to No. 5.443C, prior compatibility studies had not been performed within

the ITU-R for the adjacent-band compatibility of RNSS and AM(R)S in the 5 GHz band. This is reflected

in the call for “an appropriate value” of the out-of-band AM(R)S e.i.r.p. density limit. However, the

USA has agreed that the current provisional limit is acceptable given the current state of knowledge. At

this time, a change to No. 5.443C could have unintended consequences, and so, to prevent WRC-15 from

making any changes without having performed the appropriate ITU-R studies, the USA proposes NOC on

any proposals to alter RR No. 5.443C.

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Proposal:

NOC USA/9.1/1

ARTICLE 5

Frequency allocations

RR No. 5.443C (WRC-12)

Reason: The ITU-R has not yet completed the necessary studies to establish an appropriate value in

a relevant ITU-R Recommendation for the e.i.r.p. density limit required in the frequency band 5 010-

5 030 MHz for AM(R)S station unwanted emissions in order to ensure protection of RNSS system and

network operations (space-to-Earth) and (space-to-space) in that band.

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WAC/078(27.08.14)

Ms. Mindel De La Torre

Chief of the International Bureau

Federal Communications Commission

445 12th Street SW

Washington, DC 20554

Dear Ms. De La Torre:

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) on behalf of the Executive

Branch agencies, approves the release of the draft Executive Branch proposal for WRC-15 agenda item 7

advance publication information (API). NTIA proposes modifying agenda item 7 (API).

NTIA considered the federal agencies’ input toward the development of U.S. proposals for WRC-15.

NTIA forwards this package for your consideration and review by your WRC-15 Advisory Committee.

Mr. Charles Glass is the primary contact from my staff.

Sincerely,

(Original Signed July 11, 2014)

Karl B. Nebbia

Associate Administrator

Office of Spectrum Management

18

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE

Agenda Item 7: to consider possible changes in response to Resolution 86 (Rev. Marrakesh,

2002) of the Plenipotentiary Conference, advance publication, coordination, notification and

recording procedures for frequency assignments pertaining to satellite networks, in accordance

with Resolution 86 (Rev.WRC-07) to facilitate rational, efficient, and economical use of radio

frequencies and any associated orbits, including the geostationary-satellite orbit

Background Information: There has been a longstanding requirement in Article 9 of the Radio Regulations,

under No. 9.1, for the Radiocommunication Bureau to wait a required six months after receiving the advanced

publication information (API) for satellite networks requiring coordination under Section II of Article 9

before accepting the coordination request information, even if both sets of information are submitted to the

Bureau (BR) at the same time. While this six-month delay may have served a purpose in years past when

there was a substantial amount of technical data included in, the API for administrations to consider and

potentially comment upon, this is no longer the case. As a consequence of the simplification of the Radio

Regulations at WRC-95, the API for satellite networks requiring coordination under Section II of Article 9

includes very limited information (e.g. orbital position and frequency bands) and, as such, there is little for

administrations to review and comment. This required six month delay therefore serves no purpose other than

to delay the overall start of coordination process for satellite networks.

In addition to creating a delay to the start of the coordination process, the six-month period adds

considerable uncertainty as to the potential availability of frequency assignments at any given orbital

location. Whereas the SRS database maintained by the ITU BR can be queried and carefully examined in

the process of searching for and identifying a potential orbital location at which a new satellite network

could be launched and operated in a given frequency band, once an API for this new network is submitted

there is six months of uncertainty as the filing administration must wait to see if another administration,

which may have an API in the vicinity that has already been submitted to the ITU and is still valid, files a

coordination request in advance of the BR’s receipt of the coordination request associated with the new

API. Discussion within the ITU-R has revealed that one of the primary reasons for administrations

periodically submitting multiple API requests at every 2 or 3 degrees, or even every 6 degrees, around the

geostationary orbit is precisely to circumvent this six-month delay between Bureau receipt of the API and

CR/C. Six- months after the first “batch” of APIs is accepted by the BR from an administration, the

administration is then in a position to subsequently submit a CR/C to the BR at virtually any orbital

position. As long as the administration submits the next batch of APIs within 18 months of the first batch

this workaround solution continues.

The United States proposes modifications to Article 9 of the Radio Regulations to address the six-month

delay between the Bureau receipt of an API and CR/C, which no longer serves a useful purpose. Under

the current practice, the BR publishes an API submitted under No. 9.1 within 3 months according to the

provisions of No. 9.2B. Administrations may submit comments within 4 months under No. 9.3, however,

the coordination cannot start any sooner than 6 months after BR receipt of the API. With the six-month

delay between API and CR/C, the timing for comments on an API and start of coordination are already in

close alignment. A modified scenario with no 6 month delay would allow for coordination to start

immediately, even before receiving administration comments under No. 9.3.

Proposal:

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ARTICLE 9

Procedure for effecting coordination with or obtaining agreement of other

administrations1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 8bis (WRC-12)

Section I − Advance publication of information on satellite

networks or satellite systems

General

MOD USA/7/1

9.1

Before initiating any action under this Article or under Article 11 in respect

of frequency assignments for a satellite network or a satellite system, an administration, or one9

acting on behalf of a group of named administrations, shall, prior to the coordination procedure

described in Section II of Article 9 below, where applicable, send to the Bureau a general

description of the network or system for advance publication in the International Frequency

Information Circular (BR IFIC) not earlier than seven years and preferably not later than two

years before the planned date of bringing into use of the network or system (see also No. 11.44).

The characteristics to be provided for this purpose are listed in Appendix 4. The coordination or

notification information may also be communicated to the Bureau at the same time.; Where

coordination information is required by Section II of Article 9, the coordination information it

shall be considered as having been received by the Bureau upon its actual date of receipt whereas

notification information shall be considered as having been received by the Bureau not earlier

than six months after the date of receipt of the coordination information. for advance publication

, where coordination is required by Section II of Article 9. Where coordination is not required

by Section II, notification shall be considered as having been received by the Bureau not earlier

than six months after the date of publication of the advance publication information. (WRC-

1503)

Reasons: To address the unnecessary requirement for the Radiocommunications Bureau to wait six months

after receipt of the advanced publication information before receiving the coordination request information

for satellite networks requiring coordination under Section II of Article 9.

MOD USA/7/2

9.5B If, upon receipt of the BR IFIC containing information published under

No. 9.2B, any administration considers its existing or planned satellite systems or networks or

terrestrial stations11 to be affected, it may send its comments to the publishing administration, so

that the latter may take those comments into consideration duringwhen initiating the coordination

procedure. A copy of these comments may also be sent to the Bureau. Thereafter, both

20

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administrations shall endeavor to cooperate in joint efforts to resolve any difficulties, with the

assistance of the Bureau, if so requested by either of the parties, and shall exchange any

additional relevant information that may be available. (WRC-201500)

Reasons: To address the unnecessary requirement for the Radiocommunications Bureau to wait six

months after receipt of the advanced publication information before receiving the coordination request

information for satellite networks requiring coordination under Section II of Article 9.

21

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WAC/080(27.08.14)

Ms. Mindel De La Torre

Chief of the International Bureau

Federal Communications Commission

445 12th Street SW

Washington, DC 20554

Dear Ms. De La Torre:

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) on behalf of the Executive

Branch agencies, approves the release of revisions for the draft Executive Branch proposals for WRC-15

agenda items 1.6.1, 1.6.2, and a draft Executive Branch proposal for WRC-15 agenda item 10. NTIA

proposes further no change proposals to the table of allocations for agenda items 1.6.1 and 1.6.2. NTIA

also proposes modifying Resolution 806 (WRC-15), to add an agenda item for 5 GHz RLAN in the 5350-

5470 MHz frequency range to WRC-19.

NTIA considered the federal agencies’ input toward the development of U.S. proposals for WRC-15.

NTIA forwards this package for your consideration and review by your WRC-15 Advisory Committee.

Mr. Charles Glass is the primary contact from my staff.

Sincerely,

(Original Signed July 31, 2014)

Karl B. Nebbia

Associate Administrator

Office of Spectrum Management

22

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

DRAFT PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE

Agenda Item 1.6.1: to consider possible additional primary allocations, to the fixed-satellite service

(Earth-to-space and space-to-Earth) of 250 MHz in the range between 10 GHz and 17 GHz in Region 1;

and review the regulatory provisions on the current allocations to the fixed-satellite service (FSS) within

each range, taking into account the results of ITU-R studies, in accordance with Resolutions 151

(WRC-12)

Background Information: The 13.25-13.4 GHz frequency band has allocations to the Earth exploration-

satellite service (EESS) (active), the aeronautical radionavigation service (ARNS) and the space research

service (active) on a primary basis in all three ITU regions subject to Radio Regulation Nos. 5.497,

5.498A, and 5.499.

ITU-R sharing studies demonstrate that the proposed fixed-satellite service (FSS) (space-to-Earth) links

will interfere with the ARNS in the bands 13.25-13.4 GHz. The studies show that the ARNS

transmissions would cause interference into the FSS earth station receivers.

The 13.4-13.75 GHz frequency band has allocations to the Earth exploration-satellite service (active), the

radiolocation service and the space research service (active) on a primary basis in all three ITU regions.

RR No. 5.501A indicates that the use of the band 13.4-13.75 GHz by the space research service on a

primary basis is limited to active spaceborne sensors. Other uses of the band by the space research

service are on a secondary basis. RR Nos. 5.499, 5.500, 5.501, and 5.501B apply.

ITU-R sharing studies demonstrate that the proposed fixed-satellite service (FSS) (Earth-to-space) links in

the 13.25-13.75 GHz bands will interfere with existing authorized services in the bands 13.25-13.4 GHz

and 13.4-13.75 GHz. The sharing studies’ results show that EESS (active) altimeter measurements of

lakes, reservoirs, and coastal areas will be lost over a large area of the Earth spanning over all three ITU

regions. Mitigation techniques sufficient to protect the EESS (active) altimeters operating in the current

allocations may impose severe if not impractical restrictions on new FSS systems that might operate in

this band.

The 14.5-15.35 GHz frequency range has allocations to the fixed and mobile radio services on a primary

basis in all three ITU regions. The frequency band 14.5-14.8 GHz also has an allocation to fixed-satellite

service on a primary basis in all three ITU regions subject to Radio Regulation No. 5.510. No. 5.510

limits FSS use to feeder links for the broadcasting satellite service outside Europe, which are subject to

the Appendix 30A Broadcast Satellite Plan and associated procedures. The space research service has an

allocation on a secondary basis in the frequency band 14.5-15.35 GHz in all three regions. Aeronautical

mobile data links currently operate in the 14.5-15.35 GHz band under the mobile service (MS) allocation,

the parent service to aeronautical mobile service (AMS).

The band 15.4-17.0 GHz has allocations to the radiolocation service (RLS) on a primary basis in all three

Regions and to the aeronautical radionavigation service on a primary basis in all three Regions. Some

Administrations will operate airborne synthetic aperture radars worldwide as part of the global RLS

23

image24-00.jpg612x792

allocation in the band 15.4-17 GHz. Some Administrations also operate an airport surface detection

system on a co-primary basis with the primary RLS in the band 15.7-16.2 GHz.

ITU-R sharing studies demonstrate that the proposed FSS (Earth-to-space) links in the 10.0-17.0 GHz

bands will interfere with existing authorized services in the bands 14.5-15.35 GHz and 15.4-17.0 GHz.

The sharing studies’ results show that in order to protect the AMS receivers operating in the band 14.5-

15.35 GHz band, there is a required separation distance of up to 577 km (not accounting for terrain

obstruction). The studies also show that in order to protect radiolocation stations operating in the band

15.4-17.0 GHz, a separation distance of up to 420 km (not accounting for terrain obstruction) is required.

Given the large, required separation distances around AMS and RLS receivers’ operational area and the

mobile nature of AMS/RLS airborne receiver, the ubiquitous deployment of FSS transmitters would make

mitigation and coordination approaches to permit sharing with the FSS very difficult or impractical. In

addition, FSS space station receivers in the geostationary satellite orbit may be subject to unacceptable

levels of interference from existing operations in these bands.

With respect to FSS downlinks from Region 1 operating in the band 15.4-17.0 GHz, ITU-R studies

indicate radiolocation stations in Region 2 operating in the band 15.4-17.0 GHz may receive unacceptable

levels of interference from FSS space stations in the geostationary satellite orbit and FSS downlink earth

stations may receive unacceptable levels of interference from airborne stations beyond the radio horizon.

Mitigation techniques sufficient to protect the systems operating in the current allocations may impose

severe if not impractical restrictions on new FSS systems that might operate in this band.

With respect to FSS downlinks from Region 1 operating in the band 13.4-13.75 GHz, ITU-R studies

indicate that EESS (active) systems operating across all three ITU regions in the band 13.4-13.75 GHz

will not be unduly constrained. Therefore, operations of U.S. EESS (active) assets operating in the 13.4-

13.75 GHz band on a global basis would not be adversely affected by an ITU Region 1 FSS (s-E)

allocation in the 13.4-13.75 GHz band.

Proposal:

ARTICLE 5

Frequency allocations

Section IV – Table of Frequency Allocations

(See No. 2.1)

NOC

USA/1.6.1/1

11.7-14 GHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

13.25-13.4

EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.497

SPACE RESEARCH (active)

5.498A 5.499

24

image25-00.jpg612x792

Reasons: ITU-R studies indicate a potential for interference into existing EESS (active) systems from

FSS (E-s). ITU-R studies indicate a potential for interference between the proposed FSS (s-E) and the

existing ARNS systems.

NOC

USA/1.6.1/2

11.7-14 GHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

13.4-13.75

EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)

RADIOLOCATION

SPACE RESEARCH 5.501A

Standard frequency and time signal-satellite (Earth-to-space)

5.499 5.500 5.501 5.501B

Reasons: ITU-R studies indicate a potential for interference into existing EESS (active) systems from

FSS (Earth-to-space). EESS (active) systems would not be adversely impacted if Region 1 were to

implement FSS (space-to-Earth) links in this band. This NOC proposal applies only with regard to the

FSS (Earth-to-space) direction.

NOC

USA/1.6.1/3

14-15.4 GHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

14.5-14.8

FIXED

FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.510

MOBILE

Space research

14.8-15.35

FIXED

MOBILE

Space research

5.339

Reasons: ITU-R studies indicate a potential for interference into existing MS and AMS systems.

NOC

USA/1.6.1/4

15.4-18.4 GHz

Allocation to services

25

image26-00.jpg612x792

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

15.4-15.43

RADIOLOCATION 5.511E 5.511F

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION

5.511D

15.43-15.63

FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.511A

RADIOLOCATION 5.511E 5.511F

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION

5.511C

15.63-15.7

RADIOLOCATION 5.511E 5.511F

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION

5.511D

15.7-16.6

RADIOLOCATION

5.512 5.513

16.6-17.1

RADIOLOCATION

Space research (deep space) (Earth-to-space)

5.512 5.513

Reasons: ITU-R studies indicate a potential for interference into existing RLS systems.

SUP

USA/1.6.1/5

RESOLUTION 151 (WRC-12)

Allocations, to the fixed-satellite service

(Earth-to-space and space-to-Earth)

of 250 MHz in the range between 10 GHz and 17 GHz in Region 1

Reasons: Consequential change to completion of the agenda item.

26

image27-00.jpg612x792

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

DRAFT PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE

Agenda Item 1.6.2: to consider possible additional primary allocations, to the fixed-satellite service

(Earth-to-space) of 250 MHz in Region 2 and 300 MHz in Region 3 within the range 13-17 GHz; and

review the regulatory provisions on the current allocations to the fixed-satellite service within each

range, taking into account the results of ITU-R studies, in accordance with Resolutions 152 (WRC-12)

Background Information: The 13.25-13.4 GHz frequency band has allocations to the Earth exploration-

satellite service (active), the aeronautical radionavigation service and the space research service (active)

on a primary basis in all three ITU regions subject to Radio Regulation Nos. 5.497, 5.498A, and 5.499.

The 13.4-13.75 GHz frequency band has allocations to the Earth exploration-satellite service (active), the

radiolocation service and the space research service (active) on a primary basis in all three ITU regions.

RR No. 5.501A indicates that the use of the band 13.4-13.75 GHz by the space research service on a

primary basis is limited to active spaceborne sensors. Other uses of the band by the space research service

are on a secondary basis. RR Nos. 5.499, 5.500, 5.501, and 5.501B apply.

ITU-R sharing studies demonstrate that the proposed fixed-satellite service (FSS) (Earth-to-space) links in

the 13.25-13.75 GHz bands will interfere with existing authorized services in the bands 13.25-13.4 GHz

and 13.4-13.75 GHz. The sharing studies’ results show that EESS (active) altimeter measurements of

lakes, reservoirs, and coastal areas will be lost over a large area of the Earth spanning over all three ITU

regions. Mitigation techniques sufficient to protect the EESS (active) altimeters operating in the current

allocations may impose severe if not impractical restrictions on new FSS systems that might operate in

this band.

The 14.5-15.35 GHz frequency range has allocations to the fixed and mobile radio services on a primary

basis in all three ITU Regions. The 14.5-14.8 GHz frequency band also has an allocation to the fixed-

satellite service on a primary basis in all three ITU Regions subject to Radio Regulation No. 5.510. No.

5.510 limits FSS use to feeder links for the broadcasting satellite service outside Europe, which are

subject to the Appendix 30A Broadcast Satellite Plan and associated procedures. The space research

service has an allocation on a secondary basis in the frequency band 14.5-15.35 GHz in all three regions.

Aeronautical mobile data links currently operate in the 14.5-15.35 GHz band under the mobile service

(MS) allocation, the parent service to aeronautical mobile service (AMS).

The 15.4-17.0 GHz band is allocated to the radiolocation service (RLS) on a primary basis in all three

Regions and the 15.4-15.7 GHz band is also allocated to the aeronautical radionavigation service on a

primary basis in all three Regions. Some Administrations will operate synthetic aperture radars

worldwide as part of the global RLS allocation in the band 15.4-17 GHz. Some Administrations also

operate an airport surface detection system on a co-primary basis with the primary RLS in the band 15.7-

16.2 GHz.

27

image28-00.jpg612x792

ITU-R sharing studies demonstrate that the proposed FSS (Earth-to-space) links in the 13.0-17.0 GHz

bands will interfere with existing services in the bands 14.5-15.35 GHz and 15.4-17.0 GHz. The sharing

studies’ results show that in order to protect the AMS receivers operating in the band 14.5-15.35 GHz, a

separation distance of up to 577 km (not accounting for terrain obstruction) is required. The studies also

show that in order to protect radiolocation stations operating in the band 15.4-17.0 GHz, a separation

distance of up to 420 km (not accounting for terrain obstruction) is required. Given the large, required

separation distances around AMS and RLS receivers’ operational areas, and the mobile nature of AMS

receiver/RLS airborne receiver, the ubiquitous deployment of FSS transmitters would make mitigation

and coordination approaches to permit sharing with the FSS very difficult or impractical. In addition,

ITU-R studies have yet to demonstrate how FSS space station receivers in the geostationary satellite orbit

could mitigate unacceptable levels of interference from existing operations in these bands.

Proposal:

ARTICLE 5

Frequency allocations

Section IV – Table of Frequency Allocations

(See No. 2.1)

NOC

USA/1.6.2/1

11.7-14 GHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

13.25-13.4

EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.497

SPACE RESEARCH (active)

5.498A 5.499

Reasons: ITU-R studies indicate a potential for interference into existing EESS (active) systems.

NOC

USA/1.6.2/2

11.7-14 GHz

Allocation to services

28

image29-00.jpg612x792

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

13.4-13.75

EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)

RADIOLOCATION

SPACE RESEARCH 5.501A

Standard frequency and time signal-satellite (Earth-to-space)

5.499 5.500 5.501 5.501B

Reasons: ITU-R studies indicate a potential for interference into existing EESS (active) systems.

NOC

USA/1.6.2/3

14-15.4 GHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

14.5-14.8

FIXED

FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.510

MOBILE

Space research

14.8-15.35

FIXED

MOBILE

Space research

5.339

Reasons: ITU-R studies indicate a potential for interference into existing MS and AMS systems.

NOC

USA/1.6.2/4

15.4-18.4 GHz

Allocation to services

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

15.4-15.43

RADIOLOCATION 5.511E 5.511F

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION

5.511D

15.43-15.63

FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.511A

RADIOLOCATION 5.511E 5.511F

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION

5.511C

15.63-15.7

RADIOLOCATION 5.511E 5.511F

AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION

5.511D

15.7-16.6

RADIOLOCATION

5.512 5.513

29

image30-00.jpg612x792

16.6-17.1

RADIOLOCATION

Space research (deep space) (Earth-to-space)

5.512 5.513

Reasons: ITU-R studies indicate a potential for interference into existing RLS systems.

SUP

USA/1.6.2/5

RESOLUTION 152 (WRC-12)

Allocations to the fixed-satellite service (Earth-to-space)

of 250 MHz in Region 2 and 300 MHz in Region 3

within the range 13-17 GHz.

Reasons: Consequential change to completing the agenda item.

30

image31-00.jpg612x792

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

DRAFT PROPOSALS FOR THE WORK OF THE CONFERENCE

Agenda Item 10: to recommend to the Council, items for inclusion in the agenda for the next

WRC, and to give its views on the preliminary agenda for the subsequent conference and on

possible agenda items for future conferences, in accordance with Article 7 of the Convention

Background Information: Increasing demand for broadband data capacity is leading the industry to

increasing rely on opportunities for off-loading from traditional cellular networks onto Radio Local Area

Network (RLAN) and small-celled wireless infrastructure. Additionally, there is strong demand for

inexpensive, widely available, high-speed internet access and networking capabilities.

To address this demand for greater network data capacity, WRC-15 Agenda Item 1.1 considered

additional primary mobile service allocations for terrestrial mobile broadband capabilities, including the

possible expansion of RLAN use into the 5350-5470 MHz band.

Initial studies conducted in Joint Task Group (JTG) 4-5-6-7 indicated that sharing was not possible

between RLANs and incumbent services in the 5350-5470 MHz band utilizing existing mitigation

measures. The existing mitigation techniques studied included a 200 mW power limit, indoor restriction,

and Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) designed for the 5150-5350 MHz and 5470-5725 MHz

frequency bands. Additionally, the same ITU working parties began exploring possible new mitigation

techniques to enable sharing between RLANs and incumbent services in the 5350-5470 MHz.

Unfortunately, the WRC-15 study cycle provided insufficient time to complete the development and

consideration of the proposed mitigation techniques and further study is required.

Given the increased demand for RLANs, along with the need to ensure protection of important incumbent

services, the United States of America proposes a future WRC agenda item to continue the studies and

consider additional mitigation measures that may enable sharing between RLANs and incumbent services

in the 5350-5470 MHz band.

Proposal:

MOD USA/10/1

RESOLUTION 806 (WRC-15)

Agenda for the 2019 World Radiocommunication Conference

The World Radiocommunication Conference (Geneva, 2015),

31

image32-00.jpg612x792

ADD

USA/10/2

1.[5 GHz]

to consider, in accordance with Resolution [5GHz] (WRC-2015), regulatory

provisions and additional allocations to the mobile service in the 5350-5470 MHz band, taking into

account the results of studies;

Reasons: To enable wide-band applications for RLAN at 5350-5470 MHz while ensuring

protection of incumbent services.

ADD USA/10/3

RESOLUTION [5GHZ] (WRC-15)

Consideration of a mobile service allocation and identification for the

implementation of wireless access systems (WAS) including radio local area

networks (RLAN) in the 5350-5470 MHz band

The World Radiocommunication Conference (Geneva, 2003),

considering

a) that since WRC-07 there has been tremendous growth in the demand for mobile broadband

applications with multimedia capabilities;

b) that in many developing markets the main delivery mechanism for broadband access is expected

to be through mobile devices;

c)

that adequate and timely availability of spectrum and supporting regulatory provisions is essential

to support future growth of mobile broadband systems;

d) that the band 5 350-5 460 MHz is allocated worldwide on a primary basis to the Earth

exploration-satellite service (active) (No. 5.448B);

e) that the band 5 350-5 460 MHz is also allocated worldwide on a primary basis to the space

research service (active) (No. 5.448C);

f) that the band 5 350-5 460 MHz is allocated worldwide on a primary basis to the aeronautical

radionavigation service (No. 5.449);

g) that the band 5 350-5 470 MHz is also allocated worldwide on a primary basis to the radiolocation

service (No. 5.448D);

h) that the band 5 460-5 470 MHz is allocated worldwide on a primary basis to the radionavigation

service (No. 5.449);

i) that the band 5 460-5 470 MHz is also allocated worldwide on a primary basis to the EESS

(active), SRS (active), and radiolocation service (No. 5.448D);

j) that there is a need to protect the existing primary services in the 5 150-5 350 MHz, 5350-5470

MHz, and 5 470-5 725 MHz bands;

k) that studies have shown that sharing between incumbent services and mobile service applications

in the frequency range 5 350-5 470 MHz is not possible with current mitigation techniques but may be

possible if new or advanced mitigation techniques are developed that prove to be feasible and able to be

fielded in commercially viable systems;

l) that there is a need to specify operational restrictions for WAS, including RLANs, in the mobile

service in the band 5 350-5 470 MHz in order to protect incumbent service systems;

m) that the deployment density of WAS, including RLANs, will depend on a number of factors

including intrasystem interference and the availability of other competing technologies and services,

32

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noting

a) that initial studies have begun in the ITU-R based on work for consideration of potential mobile

allocations and identification for terrestrial mobile allocations under WRC-15 agenda item 1.1;

b) that the regulatory provisions for RLANs to enable sharing in the frequency ranges 5150-5350

MHz and 5470-5725 MHz is insufficient to enable sharing in the 5350-5470 MHz frequency range;

recognizing

a) that WAS, including RLANs, provide effective broadband solutions;

b) that there is a need for administrations to ensure that WAS, including RLANs, meet the required

mitigation techniques, for example, through equipment or standards compliance in conjunction with

effective regulatory procedures,

resolves

that WRC-19 consider a mobile allocation and identification to WAS including RLAN in the 5350-5470

MHz frequency range while ensuring:

1

Protection of current and future deployments of incumbent services;

2

Consideration of effective operational requirements which can be implemented by WAS

including RLAN to enable sharing with incumbent services,

invites ITU-R

to conduct, and complete in time for WRC-19, the appropriate studies leading to technical and operational

recommendations to facilitate sharing between WAS including RLAN and the incumbent services.

33

image34-00.jpg612x792

ATTACHMENT

PROPOSAL FOR ADDITIONAL AGENDA ITEM FOR CONSIDERATION OF A MOBILE

SERVICE ALLOCATION AND IDENTIFICATION FOR RLAN FOR THE

IMPLEMENTATION OF WIRELESS ACCESS SYSTEMS INCLUDING RADIO LOCAL AREA

NETWORKS IN THE 5350-5470 MHZ BAND

Subject: Proposed Future WRC Agenda Item for WRC-2019 for consideration of a mobile

service allocation and identification for RLAN for the implementation of wireless access systems

including radio local area networks in the 5350-5470 MHz band

Origin: United States of America

Proposal: To consider a mobile service allocation and identification for RLAN for the

implementation of wireless access systems including radio local area networks in the 5350-5470

MHz band.

Background/reason:.

Initial studies conducted in Joint Task Group (JTG) 4-5-6-7 indicated that sharing was not possible

between RLANs and incumbent services in the 5350-5470 MHz band utilizing existing mitigation

measures. The existing mitigation techniques studied included a 200 mW power limit, indoor restriction,

and Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) designed for the 5150-5350 MHz and 5470-5725 MHz

frequency bands. Additionally, the same ITU working parties began exploring possible new mitigation

techniques to enable sharing between RLANs and incumbent services in the 5350-5470 MHz.

Unfortunately, the WRC-15 study cycle provided insufficient time to complete the development and

consideration of the proposed mitigation techniques and further study is required.

Radiocommunication services concerned: Earth Exploration-Satellite Service (active), Space Research

Service (active), Aeronautical Radionavigation, Radiolocation and Radionavigation

Indication of possible difficulties: None foreseen.

Previous/ongoing studies on the issue: Studies are underway in WP 5A, WP 5B and WP 7C to examine

mitigation techniques. JTG 4-5-6-7 conducted initial sharing studies during WRC-15 study cycle.

S

tudies to be carried out by: SG 5 with the participation of: SG 7

ITU-R Study Groups concerned: SG 5 and SG 7

ITU resource implications, including financial implications (refer to CV126): Minimal

Common regional proposal: Yes/No

Multicountry proposal: Yes/No

Number of countries:

Remarks

34

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