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June, 2012

FCC to Host a Supplier Diversity Conference for Small, Minority and Women-Owned Businesses

by Calvin Osborne, Attorney Advisor
June 29, 2012

The FCC’s Office of Communications Business Opportunities (“OCBO”) hosted a Supplier Diversity Conference and Workshop on Tuesday, July 10, 2012 from 9:00 am until 4:30 pm. The conference focused on government and private sector business opportunities for small, minority, and women-owned businesses.


The event included a panel discussion, followed by small workshops. The goal of the Supplier Diversity Conference is to provide networking opportunities and share business information with suppliers of telecommunications and technology companies. This will further establish a diverse supply base. The panelists discussed how to develop and utilize the many skills and talents that small businesses possess, and address the various contract needs of large companies and how small businesses can distinguish themselves in the race for lucrative opportunities.


The first panel featured procurement officers from the Department of Defense, the Department of Transportation, the Minority Business Development Agency, and the Federal Communications Commission. The second panel featured executives from Verizon, Sprint, AT&T, Comcast, and Microsoft.


The panels were moderated by Thomas Reed, Director of OCBO, and Ronald Johnson, President of Solutions4Change, and a member of the FCC’s Advisory Committee on Diversity in the Digital Age OCBO coordinated one-on-one sessions between the panelists and any small business owner who wished to participate. In these confidential meetings, small business owners received individualized advice on supplier strategies and information on current contracting opportunities.

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FCC Chairman Challenges Private Sector to Accelerate the Next Generation of Wireless Health

by Josh Gottheimer and Maya Uppaluru
June 15, 2012

Imagine a wireless sensor embedded in your gym clothes, so small and lightweight that it is barely noticeable, that tracks your heart rate and calories burned as you exercise and sends the data to your mobile phone.  Or a wireless heart monitor that warns a physician that her patient with congestive heart failure is experiencing severe symptoms, in time to intervene before an arrhythmia occurs. 

These and other wireless health care innovations hold tremendous promise to transform health care delivery, not only by revolutionizing the way patients manage their own care, but also by cutting costs and increasing efficiencies across our health care system. 

The U.S. spends about $2 trillion annually on health care expenses—17% of GDP and more than any other industrialized country.  Chronic disease management accounts for 75% of our total health system costs, and because of that, many wireless health devices are targeting this very aspect of health care.  Studies have found that remote patient monitoring reduced the risk of hospitalization by 47%, reduced hospital stay length, and reduced office visits by 65%.

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A Call for Nominations: FCC Chairman's Awards for Advancement in Accessibility

by Kris Monteith, Acting Bureau Chief, Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau
June 14, 2012

The Commission recently announced that it would be accepting nominations for the second annual Chairman's Awards for Advancement in Accessibility (Chairman's AAA). This project, coordinated by the Commission's Accessibility and Innovation Initiative (A&I Initiative), seeks to recognize innovations in the field of Accessibility and Technology. The Chairman's AAA and the A&I initiative are based on recommendations in the National Broadband Plan, an FCC report to Congress in 2010.

In a rapidly changing world, we must ensure that newly developed technologies continue to meet the needs of people with disabilities. Technological advances, moreover, provide opportunities to bridge current accessibility gaps in a cost-effective and efficient manner. To this end, the A&I Initiative works to foster collaborative problem-solving among industry, consumer, and government stakeholders so that people with disabilities can reap the full benefit of broadband communication technologies. The Chairman's AAA encourages innovation in this field through high-profile recognition.

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WCB Cost Model Virtual Workshop 2012 - Community Anchor Institutions

by Wireline Competition Bureau
June 1, 2012

Please provide comments to the issue below as part of the 2012 WCB cost model virtual workshop for inclusion in the record. Comments are moderated for conformity to the workshop's guidelines.

Background

The Commission has a statutory obligation to ensure that schools, libraries, and health care providers have access to advanced telecommunications and information services. In the USF/ICC Transformation Order, the Commission established a performance goal of ensuring "universal availability of modern networks capable of delivering broadband and voice services . . . to community anchor institutions." Community anchor institutions are defined by the Order to include such entities as schools, libraries, hospitals and other medical providers, public safety entities, institutions of higher education, and community support organizations that facilitate greater use of broadband by vulnerable populations, including low-income, the unemployed, and the aged.

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WCB Cost Model Virtual Workshop 2012 - Business Locations

by Wireline Competition Bureau
June 1, 2012

Please provide comments to the issue below as part of the 2012 WCB cost model virtual workshop for inclusion in the record. Comments are moderated for conformity to the workshop's guidelines.

Background

Hybrid Cost Proxy Model: The Hybrid Cost Proxy Model (HCPM) used carrier-submitted line count data to determine the number of switched business lines and special access lines in a wire center and assumed a certain percentage were provided using a DS1. A DS1 provides 24 voice equivalent channels (DS0s) using two copper pairs. These percentages were then used to reduce the number of DS0 lines deployed by the model in each wire center to account for the DS1s that were deployed to serve business locations and special access locations. Although the costs of special access services were included in the total cost of each wire center, and costs were unitized by both switched access and non-switched access lines, support was only provided to locations served by switched access lines (including business locations).

Connect America Cost Model: In the USF/ICC Transformation Order, the Commission established a performance goal of ensuring "the universal availability of modern networks capable of delivering broadband and voice service to homes, businesses, and community anchor institutions."

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