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Chairman Genachowski's Response to Members of Congress Regarding FM Radio Tuners in Mobile Telephone Handsets

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Released: April 2, 2010



March 18, 2010


The Honorable Robert Aderholt
U.S. House of Representatives
1433 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Aderholt:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Mike Arcuri
U.S. House of Representatives
127 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Arcuri:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Steve Austria
U.S. House of Representatives
1641 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Austria:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Spencer T. Bachus
U.S. House of Representatives
2246 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Bachus:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Jo Bonner
U.S. House of Representatives
2236 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Bonner:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Leonard Boswell
U.S. House of Representatives
1427 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Boswell:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Bobby N. Bright
U.S. House of Representatives
1205 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Bright:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Paul C. Broun
U.S. House of Representatives
325 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Broun:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Henry E. Brown, Jr.
U.S. House of Representatives
103 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Brown:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Vern Buchanan
U.S. House of Representatives
218 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Buchanan:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Dan Burton
U.S. House of Representatives
2308 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Burton:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable George K. Butterfield
U.S. House of Representatives
413 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Butterfield:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Ken Calvert
U.S. House of Representatives
2201 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Calvert:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Anh "Joseph" Cao
U.S. House of Representatives
2113 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Cao:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Howard Coble
U.S. House of Representatives
2468 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Coble:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Tom Cole
U.S. House of Representatives
2458 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Cole:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable K. Michael Conaway
U.S. House of Representatives
1527 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Conaway:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable John Culberson
U.S. House of Representatives
1514 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Culberson:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Artur Davis
U.S. House of Representatives
208 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Davis:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Geoff Davis
U.S. House of Representatives
1108 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Davis:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Charles W. Dent
U.S. House of Representatives
1009 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Dent:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Brad Ellsworth
U.S. House of Representatives
513 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Ellsworth:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Bart Gordon
U.S. House of Representatives
2306 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Gordon:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Sam Graves
U.S. House of Representatives
1415 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Graves:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Parker Griffith
U.S. House of Representatives
417 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Griffith:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Brett Guthrie
U.S. House of Representatives
510 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Guthrie:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Phil Hare
U.S. House of Representatives
428 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congresswoman Hare:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Alcee L. Hastings
U.S. House of Representatives
2353 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Hastings:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Baron P. Hill
U.S. House of Representatives
223 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Hill:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Lynn Jenkins
U.S. House of Representatives
130 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Jenkins:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Frank LoBiondo
U.S. House of Representatives
2427 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman LoBiondo:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Blaine Luetkemeyer
U.S. House of Representatives
1118 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Luetkemeyer:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Carolyn McCarthy
U.S. House of Representatives
2346 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congresswoman McCarthy:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Michael McCaul
U.S. House of Representatives
131 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman McCaul:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Mike McIntyre
U.S. House of Representatives
2437 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman McIntyre:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Cathy McMorris Rodgers
U.S. House of Representatives
1323 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congresswoman McMorris Rodgers:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable John L. Mica
U.S. House of Representatives
2313 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Mica:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Michael Michaud
U.S. House of Representatives
1724 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Michaud:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Candice S. Miller
U.S. House of Representatives
228 Cannon House Office Bldg.
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congresswoman Miller:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Randy Neugebauer
U.S. House of Representatives
1424 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Neugebauer:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Eleanor Holmes Norton
U.S. House of Representatives
2136 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congresswoman Norton:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Pete Olson
U.S. House of Representatives
514 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Olson:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Todd Platts
U.S. House of Representatives
2455 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Platts:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Ted Poe
U.S. House of Representatives
430 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Poe:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Tom Price
U.S. House of Representatives
424 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Price:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Mike Quigley
U.S. House of Representatives
1319 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Quigley:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Laura Richardson
U.S. House of Representatives
1725 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congresswoman Richardson:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable David P. Roe
U.S. House of Representatives
419 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Roe:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Mike Rogers
U.S. House of Representatives
324 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Rogers:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Loretta Sanchez
U.S. House of Representatives
1114 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congresswoman Sanchez:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Linda T. Snchez
U.S. House of Representatives
1222 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congresswoman Snchez:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Aaron Schock
U.S. House of Representatives
509 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Schock:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Heath Shuler
U.S. House of Representatives
422 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Shuler:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Mark Souder
U.S. House of Representatives
2231 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Souder:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Patrick Tiberi
U.S. House of Representatives
113 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Tiberi:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Michael Turner
U.S. House of Representatives
1740 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Turner:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Greg Walden
U.S. House of Representatives
2352 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Walden:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Peter Welch
U.S. House of Representatives
1404 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Welch:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Lynn A. Westmoreland
U.S. House of Representatives
1213 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Westmoreland:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure




March 18, 2010


The Honorable Joe Wilson
U.S. House of Representatives
212 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Congressman Wilson:


Thank you for your letter regarding the role of FM-based technologies in issuing
emergency alerts and warnings, particularly the inclusion of FM radio tuners in mobile telephone
handsets.


Pursuant to the Warning Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act, the Commission
established a Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) by which participating wireless carriers
may provide customers with emergency alerts and warnings via cell phones and other mobile
devices. I welcome your suggestion that the Commission look into FM-based technologies as
part of the CMAS. A number of broadcast industry organizations and other stakeholders
supporting FM-based technologies participated in the Commercial Mobile Service Alert
Advisory Committee process to develop technical aspects of the CMAS.

As you may be aware, on April 9, 2008, the Commission released its First Report and
Order adopting technologically neutral rules for the CMAS. In that Order, the Commission
considered the comments filed by supporters of FM-based emergency alert technologies, and
ultimately concluded that it would "not require or prohibit the use of ALERT-FM . . . or similar
systems as the basis of the CMAS." CMAS participants, then, are free to adopt FM-based
technologies as they desire.

On December 7, 2009, the Commission initiated the 28-month period during which
Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers must develop, test and deploy the CMAS. I am
enclosing a copy of the Public Notice and News Release for your information.


I appreciate your interest in this very important matter. We will include your letter in the
CMAS docket. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.






















Enclosure


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