Skip Navigation

Federal Communications Commission

English Display Options

Commission Document

EAAC TTY Transition

Download Options

Released: September 12, 2012
<this area for real time captions>
EAAC
TTY Transition 
Draft report from the 
EAAC  TTY transition group
14 September 2012
Gunnar Hellström, Omnitor

<this area for real time captions>
TTY Transition charter and 
background

The TTY Transition group works with TTY related goals of the main EAAC charter.

EAAC Provision:  Deadlines by which interconnected and non‐interconnected 


VoIP service providers and manufacturers shall achieve the actions . . . where 


achievable, and for the possible phase out of current‐generation TTY technology 
to the extent that this technology is replaced with more effective and efficient 
technologies and methods to enable access to 9‐1‐1 emergency services by 
individuals with disabilities.  

The EAAC submitted a set of recommendations in December 2011 used as starting 
point and framework for the TTY Transition group.

<this area for real time captions>
TTY transition EEAC background

Recommendation P6.1: No TTY Phase‐Out Deadline for PSAP:

The EAAC recommends 
against imposing any deadline for phasing out TTY at the PSAPs until the analog phone 
system (PSTN) no longer exists, either as the backbone or as peripheral analog legs, unless 
ALL legs trap and convert TTY to IP real‐time text and maintain VCO capability.

Recommendation T6.3: Baudot (TTY) Support:

The EAAC recommends that Baudot (TTY) 
be supported by all PSAPs with VCO and HCO capabilities until there are no more TTYs in 
use – or until there is a gateway between every TTY user and the PSAP, that converts TTY 
into the proper real‐time text format for VoIP systems supported by the PSAPs including 
support for VCO/HCO functionality. …

<this area for real time captions>
TTY transition EEAC background

Recommendation T2.2: Removal of TTY Requirement:  

The EAAC 
recommends that the FCC remove the requirement for TTY (analog 
real‐time text) support for new IP‐based consumer devices that 
implement IP‐based text communications that include, at a minimum, 
real time text [in the same call] or, in an LTE environment, IMS 
Multimedia Telephony that includes real‐time text [in the same call].  
The text must be possible to use in parallel with voice on the same call 
so that VCO equivalence is maintained. 

<this area for real time captions>
TTY Transition work plan
• The TTY transition group agreed to produce a report providing insight 
and advice on critial factors regarding TTY transition.
• The report was planned to be ready 14 September 2012.
• It is now available as draft – result of work in progress. 
• Draft is available in EAAC Wiki, in section for TTY Transition.
http://eaac‐recommendations.wikispaces.com/TTY+Transition
• Final report is now proposed for December 2012
• Next step: Internal review and handling any comments. 

<this area for real time captions>
TTY transition group

Chair: Gunnar Hellström, Omnitor and Paul Michaelis, Avaya Labs.

Toni Dunne, Intrado

Cheryl King, FCC

David Dzumba, Nokia

Matt Gerst, CTIA

Robert Mather, DoJ

Richard Ray, NENA / LA City

John Snapp, Intrado

Al Sonnenstrahl, CSD

Arnoud VanWijk, R3TF.org

Gregg Vanderheiden, Trace  Center

Norman Williams, RERC Telecommunications Access,Gallaudet University

Joel Ziev, Partners for Access

<this area for real time captions>
TTY Transition report structure

Goals and background

The current situation of TTY and other accessible communication.

Reasons to leave TTY,  keep TTY, create TTY replacement

Transmission problems and remedies for TTY in modern networks

Functional goals of a TTY replacement

Technologies ready for TTY replacement for user‐user and 9‐1‐1 calling. 

Interoperability between TTY and TTY replacement

Mainstream vs Accessible solutions. Can the gap be closed?

Policy overview. Change and synchronization needed.

Recommendations

Influenced entities

Timeline

<this area for real time captions>
The current situation
• The TTY enables a limited functionality for intermixed voice and
real‐time text, integrated in the telephone network. 
– Slower than rapid typing, limited character set, only alternating text 
and audio, no popular wireless solution
• Some important features are not yet provided by any other 
widespread solution in USA.
• Estimation 100 000 users in USA.
– 20 000 9‐1‐1 calls per year
– 18 M calls per year user – user and relay
• Communication problems in VoIP networks

<this area for real time captions>
Reasons to keep or abandon TTY

Reasons for users to keep the TTY
– It allows intermixed voice and text. Important for Hard‐of‐hearing, speech‐
disabled, 9‐1‐1 etc.
– The only direct link to 9‐1‐1
– Robust, always ready
– Have not bothered to look for other solutions
– ....

Reasons for users to abandon TTY
– Limited mobility
– Fewer people use it.
– Videophones replaced it. 
– Many alternatives are available even if not providing same functionality. 
– ...

<this area for real time captions>
Specific solutions for persons with 
deafblindness
• NDBEDP program for supporting deaf‐blind 
communication.
– Distributes among other things TTYs with assistive 
technology.
– Need to be synchronized with TTY replacement so 
that new communications technology for 
deafblind people is interoperable..

<this area for real time captions>
Transmission problems
• Problems if attaching TTY to VoIP network.
– Sensitive to packet loss. Already 0.12% loss creates 1% character loss.
• Coding and audio handling
– Makes TTY tones unclear and can cause corruption and loss
• Echo cancellers optimized for voice
– May malfunction in precence of TTY tones and cause corruption and loss
• Problem level not known.
– More research needed
• Makes good replacement desireable  

<this area for real time captions>
Requirements on a TTY replacement
• Smooth and rapid text communication
• Simultaneous voice
• Full character set.
• Wireless and fixed 
• Robust transmission
• Use existing standards for rapid deployment
• User‐user, relay, ng9‐1‐1 
• Multi‐party calls
• TTY interoperability
• Interoperable with videophones with text

<this area for real time captions>
Proposed technology
• Depending on call control environment
• Native SIP   ( often used for VoIP )
– Common audio codecs, e.g. G.711
– T.140 / RFC 4103 RTP based real‐time text
• Wireless and IMS , LTE and VOLTE
– IMS Multimedia Telephony
• (using the same real‐time text standard)
• Also specified for ng‐9‐1‐1 access in RFC 6443 and NENA i3 
technical specification

<this area for real time captions>
Implementation in other technologies 
than SIP and IMS
• Providers in other call control environments may use any real‐time 
text transport specification available for the environment. 
• They need to convert to SIP and RFC 4103  and audio in order to 
provide ng‐9‐1‐1 access and interoperability.
• One protocol even mentioned as a possible extension on the NG‐9‐
1‐1 support is XMPP
– Work in progress to create a standard for real‐time text based on 
XMPP.
– Huge work to have one more protocol than SIP all way in to the PSAP. 
More likely that it needs to be converted to SIP also in the future.

<this area for real time captions>
Interoperability 
TTY – TTY replacement
• Conversion between TTY and TTY replacement is no big 
technology challenge. Easily done in gateways and 
multifunction terminals
• But to get it in the call path where needed is a 
challenge. 
• The report provides proposals and recommendations, 
all with some drawbacks.
15

<this area for real time captions>
The mainstream – accessibility gap
• Mainstream text services are attractive because they reach 
many users.
• Accessible text services are attractive because they provide 
suitable functionality. 
• The goal is that mainstream services shall be accessible and 
fully functional. Or that the accessible services shall render 
mainstream acceptance.
• Without that, both mainstream and accessible services 
continue to provide limited functionality. 

<this area for real time captions>
Making TTY replacement a mainstream 
feature
• In the work with TTY replacement there should be 
efforts to make its main features mainstream.
– Base it on mainstream technology
– Make it attractive to mainstream users
– Trial it with mainstream users.
– Launch it within mainstream providers.
– But do not give up on accessibility features.
17

<this area for real time captions>
Regulation support
• If possible, synchronize with Section 255/508 
refresh by Access Board NOW. They define 
mandatory features of communication 
products and services. 
• What is required of communication products 
is also what should be supported by ng9‐1‐1.
18

<this area for real time captions>
Regulation support
• Relax PSTN TTY connection requirement for 
products implementing TTY Replacement.
• But maintain the interoperability requirement 
if feasible interoperability approach is agreed.
19

<this area for real time captions>
Entities influenced

TRS providers
TTY producers 
Standards organizations 
Telecom Equipment Distribution Program

National DeafBlind Equipment Distribution Program
NENA

PSAPs 
NG9‐1‐1 

Mobile manufacturers

Carriers

FCC

DOJ

Accessibility advocacy groups
20

<this area for real time captions>
Timeline
• Settle what TTY Replacement is and start 
deployment within 24 months.
• Do not set a fixed deadline for TTY phase‐out 
if not major communication problems appear 
during PSTN close down.
• Aim at having all new users on TTY 
replacement after 7 years.
21

<this area for real time captions>
Conclusions and 
Recommendations

The TTY transition report ends with a set of recommendations extracted 
from the chapters.

See http://eaac‐recommendations.wikispaces.com/TTY+Transition

One important conclusion is: 

Consistent implementation of a well‐defined "TTY replacement" with 
higher functionality real‐time text, simultaneous voice and better 
mobility can fill an important need in accessible communication for user‐
to‐user calls, relayed calls and 9‐1‐1 calls.

22

<this area for real time captions>
TTY Transition
EAAC TTY Transition group
Gunnar Hellström
gunnar.hellstrom@omnitor.se
23

Note: We are currently transitioning our documents into web compatible formats for easier reading. We have done our best to supply this content to you in a presentable form, but there may be some formatting issues while we improve the technology. The original version of the document is available as a PDF, Word Document, or as plain text.

close
FCC

You are leaving the FCC website

You are about to leave the FCC website and visit a third-party, non-governmental website that the FCC does not maintain or control. The FCC does not endorse any product or service, and is not responsible for, nor can it guarantee the validity or timeliness of the content on the page you are about to visit. Additionally, the privacy policies of this third-party page may differ from those of the FCC.