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FCC FY 2014 Budget

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Released: April 10, 2013

Federal

Communications

Commission

Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Estimates

Submitted to Congress

April 2013


Table of Contents




Page












Introduction:

................................................................................................................................ 1


FY 2014 Request:


• Summary of Request .......................................................................................................... 3


• Proposed Appropriation Language .................................................................................... 4


• Legislative Proposals ......................................................................................................... 5


• Summary of FY 2012-FY 2014 FTEs and Funding Comparison...................................... 6


• FYs 2012-2014 Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Distribution by Goal ................................... 7


• Historical & Estimated FTEs ............................................................................................ 9


• Summary of Changes ....................................................................................................... 10


• Narrative Explanation of Changes ................................................................................... 11


• Economy Act Agreements/Reimbursable ........................................................................ 14


Performance Plan:

• FCC Strategic Goals – 2012 through 2016 ...................................................................... 16


• What the FCC Commits to Accomplish in FY 2014 ....................................................... 17


Fee Collections and Auctions:

................................................................................................... 38

i

Bureaus and Offices FY 2014 Requirements:


• Table of Contents of FY 2014 Requirements .................................................................. 43


• Office of Chairman and Commissioners ......................................................................... 44


• Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau ................................................................. 45


• Enforcement Bureau ........................................................................................................ 47


• International Bureau ........................................................................................................ 49


• Media Bureau ................................................................................................................... 51


• Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau ................................................................. 52



• Wireless Telecommunications Bureau ............................................................................ 55


• Wireline Competition Bureau .......................................................................................... 56


Agency Offices:


• Office of Administrative Law Judges ............................................................................ 57


• Office of Communications Business Opportunities ...................................................... 59


• Office of Engineering and Technology ......................................................................... 61


• Office of General Counsel ............................................................................................. 63


• Office of Inspector General ........................................................................................... 65


• Office of Legislative Affairs .......................................................................................... 67

ii



• Office of the Managing Director ....................................................................................... 68


• Office of Media Relations ................................................................................................. 69


• Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis ............................................................. 70


• Office of Workplace Diversity .......................................................................................... 71


Appendices:


• Summary of Requested Resources ...................................................................................... 73


• Summary Tables – Distribution of Resources ..................................................................... 77


• Distribution of Resources by Goal ...................................................................................... 91


• Summary of Increases by Budget Object Class Code ......................................................... 92


• Allocation of Obligations by Object Class Code ................................................................. 93


• Pro Rata Allocation of Obligations by Object Class Code .................................................. 94


Exhibits and Reports:



• Universal Service Exhibit .................................................................................................... 95


• Auction Program and Loan Financing Exhibit .................................................................... 96


• Responses to Congressional Inquiries Concerning GAO .................................................... 99





iii


















INTRODUCTION








Introduction


The Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission) is pleased to present its fiscal year
(FY) 2014 budget request. The FCC is requesting a budget of $359,299,000 to carry out the FCC’s
functions and meet the expectations of Congress.

The FCC’s FY 2014 budget submission includes requests for funding to: (1) support Commission-
wide information technology needs through extending the enterprise storage; (2) support for reform of
the Universal Service Fund Support Program; (3) space consolidation and facilities improvement that
will reduce lease arrangements that are not cost effective and improve efficiencies; (4) create a Do-
Not-Call registry for telephone numbers used by Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs); (5) provide
resources for mission-critical systems to ensure that they are operational during a Continuity of
Operations (COOP) event; and (6) provide contract funding to support mandatory audits for the Office
of the Inspector General.

In furtherance of these objectives and the FCC’s mission, the FY 2014 budget request will be used to
support the following Strategic Goals:

Strategic Goal 1: Connect America


Maximize Americans’ access to – and the adoption of—affordable fixed and mobile broadband where
they live, work, and travel.

Strategic Goal 2: Maximize Benefits of Spectrum

Maximize the overall benefits of spectrum for the United States.

Strategic Goal 3: Protect and Empower Consumers


Empower consumers by ensuring that they have the tools and information they need to make informed
choices; protect consumers from harm in the communications market.

Strategic Goal 4: Promote Innovation, Investment, and America’s Global
Competitiveness

Promote innovation in a manner that improves the nation’s ability to compete in the global
economy, creating a virtuous circle that results in more investment and in turn enables
additional innovation.

Strategic Goal 5: Promote Competition


Ensure a competitive market for communications and media services to foster innovation,
investment, and job creation and to ensure consumers have meaningful choice in affordable
services.

Strategic Goal 6: Public Safety and Homeland Security

Promote the availability of reliable, interoperable, redundant, rapidly restorable critical
communications infrastructures that are supportive of all required services.

Strategic Goal 7: Advance Key National Purposes

Through international and national interagency efforts, advance the use of broadband for key national
purposes.

- 1 -


Strategic Goal 8: Operational Excellence


Make the FCC a model for excellence in government by effectively managing the Commission’s
human, information, and financial resources; by making decisions based on sound data and analyses;
and by maintaining a commitment to transparent and responsive processes that encourage public
involvement and best serve the public interest.


The FCC’s FY 2014 budget submission also includes a request to decrease the spending of Auctions
funding from $98.7 million to $89.4 million to support the timely implementation of the Auctions
Incentive program.

As in prior years, the FCC is submitting its FY 2014 budget request information at the organizational
level to show the proposed use of resources. In addition, the FCC’s budget request also shows the
proposed use of funds by key accounts within each bureau or office. This format provides a detailed
view of the FCC’s proposed use of budgetary resources. We welcome the budgetary process and stand
ready to provide Congress with the information to ensure effective oversight of the FCC.








- 2 -














FY 2014 REQUEST








SUMMARY OF REQUEST

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is requesting a FY 2014 appropriation of $359,299,000. We project the FCC will
employ 1821 full-time equivalents (FTEs) in FY 2014 from requested resources.

The FCC will use the FY 2014 funds to carry out its fundamental mission to ensure that the American people have available, at reasonable costs and
without discrimination, rapid, efficient, Nation - and world-wide communications services whether by radio, television, wire, satellite, or cable.
($ in thousands)

FY 2013

FY 2014

Congressional

Congressional

Requested

FTE

Request

FTE

Request

FTE

Changes

Total Direct Appropriation

$0
$0
$0

Budget Authority to use Offsetting Collections:

Regulatory Fees - Commission
1,730
$338,032
1,775
$348,210
45
$10,178
Regulatory Fees - OIG
46
$8,750
46
$11,089
0
$2,339

Total Offsetting Collections

1,776
$346,782
1,821
$359,299
45
$12,517

Authority to spend Other Offsetting Collections:

Economy Act/Misc. Other Reimbursables
$6,000
$6,000
$0
Auction Cost Recovery Reimbursements - Commission
$97,447 1/
$88,694
($8,753)
Auction Cost Recovery Reimbursements - OIG
$1,292 1/
$706
($586)

Subtotal: Budget Authority Offsetting Collections

$104,739
$95,400
($9,339)

Subtotal: Offsetting Collections

1,776
$451,521
1,821
$454,699
45
$3,178

Other Budget Authority:
Credit Program Account

$3,926
$1,933
($1,993)
Universal Service Fund (USF)
0
$5,011 3/
0
$4,259 3/
0
($752)

Subtotal: Other Budget Authority

0
$8,937
0
$6,192
0
($2,745)

Total Gross Proposed Budget Authority

1,776 2/
$460,458
1,821
$460,891
0
$433
1/ The FCC received a Continuing Resolution Anomaly for FY 2013 in the amount of $13.7M for Auctions.
2/ The FTE number for FY 2013 has changed from the FY 2013 Congressional budget as it no longer reflects the higher FTE ceiling; instead it reflects
the actual FTE number that is expected to be employed.
3/ The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008 (P.L. 110-161) authorizes use of $21.5M to be used by the Office of the Inspector General for USF Audit
Support. In FY 2008 - FY 2012, $12.2M was obligated. The remaining $9.3M has been carried forward, as follows: $5.0M is estimated to be used in
FY 2013, and $4.3M will be used for future fiscal years.

- 3 -



FY 2014 PROPOSED APPROPRIATION LANGUAGE



For necessary expenses of the Federal Communications Commission, as authorized by law, including
uniforms and allowances therefore, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. §§ 5901-5902; not to exceed $4,000 for
official reception and representation expenses; purchase and hire of motor vehicles; special counsel
fees; and services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. § 3109, $359,299,000, to remain available until expended:
Provided, That $359,299,000 of offsetting collections shall be assessed and collected pursuant to
section 9 of title I of the Communications Act of 1934, shall be retained and used for necessary
expenses and shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That the sum herein
appropriated shall be reduced as such offsetting collections are received during fiscal year 2014 so as
to result in a final fiscal year 2014 appropriation estimated at $0: Provided further, That any offsetting
collections received in excess of $359,299,000 in fiscal year 2014 shall not be available for obligation:
Provided further, That remaining offsetting collections from prior years collected in excess of the
amount specified for collection in each year and otherwise becoming available on October 1, 2013,
shall not be available for obligation: Provided further, That, notwithstanding 47 U.S.C. § 309(j)(8)(B),
proceeds from the use of a competitive bidding system that may be retained and made available for
obligation shall not exceed $89,400,000 for fiscal year 2014, including not to exceed $705,897 for
obligation by the Office of the Inspector General: Provided further, That, of the amount appropriated
under this heading, not less than $11,089,340 shall be for the salaries and expenses of the Office of
Inspector General.








- 4 -



Legislative Proposals


The Administration is proposing legislative changes in the President’s FY 2014 Budget that pertain to
the FCC and that are designed to improve spectrum management and represent sound economic policy.
The proposed legislative changes are included below.


Spectrum License User Fee

To promote efficient use of the electromagnetic spectrum, the Administration proposes to provide the
FCC with express authority to use other economic mechanisms, such as fees, as a spectrum
management tool. The FCC would be authorized to set user fees on unauctioned spectrum licenses,
which could be useful in certain instances. Fees would be phased in over time to determine the
appropriate application and level for fees. Fee collections are estimated to begin in 2013, and total
$4.8 billion through 2023.

Repurpose 1675 -1680 Megahertz using Auction or Fee Authority


The Administration proposes to direct that the FCC use either auction or fee authority to repurpose
spectrum frequencies between 1675-1680 megahertz for wireless broadband use by 2017, subject to
sharing arrangements with Federal weather satellites. Currently, the spectrum is being used for
radiosondes (weather balloons). A new weather satellite that is scheduled for launch in 2015 will
operate in adjacent frequencies. If this proposal is enacted, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration would move the radiosondes to another frequency, allowing the spectrum to be
repurposed for commercial use with limited protection zones for the remaining weather satellite
downlinks. Without this proposal, these frequencies are unlikely to be repurposed to commercial use.
The proposal is expected to raise $230 million over the next 10 years.

Auction Domestic Satellite Service Spectrum Licenses

The FCC would be allowed to assign licenses for certain satellite services that are predominantly
domestic through competitive bidding, as had been done before a 2005 court decision called the
practice into question on technical grounds. The proposal is expected to raise $50 million from 2013-
2023.


- 5 -




SUMMARY OF FY 2012 - FY 2014 FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs) AND FUNDING

FY 12

FY 13

FY 14

(Dollars in Thousands ($000))

FTEs

Appropriation

FTEs

C ongre ssional

FTEs

C ongre ssional

Actuals

(Note 1)

Re que st

Re que st

C hairman and C ommissione rs………….………..

25
$4,278
31
$5,509
31
$5,564

C onsume r & Gove rnme ntal Affairs Bure au …...

172
25,827
167
25,109
167
26,858

Enforce me nt Bure au …………………………………

267
44,546
265
48,338
265
46,314

Inte rnational Bure au……………………….…………

121
21,549
120
21,268
120
21,471

Me dia Bure au …………………………………...…..

183
27,947
180
28,294
180
28,057

Public Safe ty & Home land Se curity Bure au ……

111
17,997
112
19,109
112
18,281

W ire le ss Te le communications Bure au ……………

218
16,326
220
16,654
220
16,804

W ire line C ompe tition Bure au …………...…..……

160
27,858
176
30,656
217
40,069

O ffice of Administrative Law Judge s ….………….

3
386
4
545
4
550

O ffice of C ommun. Busine ss O pportunitie s ……..

12
2,375
12
2,003
12
2,022

O ffice of Engine e ring & Te chnology……………….

80
13,777
85
14,268
85
13,898

O ffice of the Ge ne ral C ounse l ……………………..

70
12,746
73
13,611
73
13,737

O ffice of Le gislative Affairs ………………………

13
2,106
12
2,097
12
2,117

O ffice of the Managing Dire ctor …………………..

203
104,061
219
102,202
223
104,023

O ffice of Me dia Re lations …………………………

16
2,717
16
2,501
16
2,526

O ffice of Strate gic Planning & Policy Analysis….

26
3,932
33
5,037
33
5,083

O ffice of W orkplace Dive rsity …………………….

5
803
5
829
5
837

FC C SUBTO TAL

1,685
$329,232
1,730
$338,032
1,775
$348,210

O ffice of Inspe ctor Ge ne ral …..………………………..

40
9,455
46
8,750
46
11,089

FC C TO TAL

1,725
$338,687
1,776
$346,782
1,821
$359,299

Note 1:

T he FT E number for FY 2013 has changed from the FY 2013 Congressional budget as it no longer reflects the higher FT E ceiling; instead it
reflects the actual FT E number that is expected to be employed.

- 6 -



FY 2012 Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Distribution by Goal

C ompe tition

C ontinual

Public Safe ty &

Broadband

C onsume rs

& Innovation

Improve me nt

Home land Se c

Inte rnational

Total

12
12
12
12
12
12
12

C ommissione rs

O ffice s

2
6
11
2
3
1
25

Bure aus

Consumer &
Governmental Affairs
21
95
29
15
12
0
172
Enforcement
1
116
65
8
75
2
267
International
10
1
67
3
5
35
121
Media
4
2
164
10
3
0
183
Public Safety &
Homeland Security
7
0
16
2
86
0
111
Wireless T elecomm.
50
3
134
23
7
1
218
Wireline Competition
47
35
74
3
1
0
160
Subtotal Bure aus
140
252
549
64
189
38
1,232

O ffice s

Admin. Law Judges
0
3
0
0
0
0
3
Comm. Business Ops.
1
2
9
0
0
0
12
Engineering and T ech.
6
0
69
3
2
0
80
General Counsel
11
9
41
2
7
0
70
Legislative Affairs
7
1
5
0
0
0
13
Managing Director
5
13
31
149
4
1
203
Media Relations
0
0
0
16
0
0
16
Strategic Planning/
Policy Analysis
8
0
14
2
2
0
26
Workplace Diversity
0
0
0
5
0
0
5
Subtotal O ffice s
38
28
169
178
14
1
428
Subtotal
180
286
729
244
206
40
1,685
Inspector General
7
13
0
20
0
0
40

Totals

187
299
729
264
206
40
1,725

- 7 -



FY 2013 - FY 2014 Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Distribution by Goal

Maximize

Prote ct &

Ame rica's

Public Safety

Adance Key

Connect

Benefits of

Empowe r

Global

Promote

& Homeland

National

Operational

Ame rica

Spe ctrum

C onsume rs

C ompe titive ne ss C ompe tition

Se curity

Purpose s

Exce lle nce

Total

13
14
13
14
13
14
13
14
13
14
13
14
13
14
13
14
13
14

C ommissione rs

O ffice s

2
2
2
2
7
7
2
2
8
8
4
4
3
3
3
3
31
31

Bure aus

Consumer &
Governmental Affairs
15
15
9
9
93
93
3
3
19
19
10
10
8
8
10
10
167
167
Enforcement
1
1
10
10
116
116
9
9
46
46
67
67
12
12
6
6
265
265
International
7
7
3
3
1
1
42
42
47
47
5
5
13
13
2
2
120
120
Media
3
3
4
4
2
2
16
16
113
113
3
3
32
32
8
8
180
180
Public Safety &
Homeland Security
5
5
11
11
0
0
2
2
11
11
78
78
4
4
2
2
112
112
Wireless T elecomm.
35
35
18
18
3
3
14
14
94
94
6
6
32
32
17
17
220
220
Wireline Competition
40
81
10
10
38
38
7
7
55
55
2
2
22
22
2
2
176
217
Subtotal Bure aus
105
146
65
65
253
253
93
93
384
384
170
170
123
123
47
47
1,240
1,281

O ffice s

Admin. Law Judges
0
0
0
0
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
4
Comm. Business Ops.
1
1
0
0
2
2
1
1
6
6
0
0
2
2
0
0
12
12
Engineering and T ech.
6
6
3
3
1
1
7
7
48
48
2
2
15
15
2
2
85
85
General Counsel
8
8
4
4
9
9
4
4
31
31
6
6
9
9
2
2
73
73
Legislative Affairs
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
0
0
2
2
0
0
12
12
Managing Director
5
8
39
39
13
13
5
5
22
22
6
6
7
7
124
124
219
223
Media Relations
0
0
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
12
12
16
16
Strategic Planning/
Policy Analysis
8
8
2
2
1
1
2
2
11
11
2
2
6
6
2
2
33
33
Workplace Diversity
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
3
3
5
5
Subtotal O ffice s
31
34
55
55
31
31
20
20
121
121
16
16
42
42
144
144
459
463
Subtotal
138
183
122
122
291
291
115
115
513
513
189
189
168
168
193
193
1,730
1,775
Inspector General
6
6
7
7
14
14
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
15
15
46
46

Totals (Note 1)

144
189
130
130
305
305
116
116
514
514
190
190
169
169
208
208
1,776
1,821

Note 1:

The FTE number for FY 2013 has changed from the FY 2013 Congressional budget as it no longer reflects the higher FTE ceiling; instead it reflects the
actual FTE number that is expected to be employed.

- 8 -



- 9 -



- 10 -



Narrative Explanation of Increases and Decreases


Inflationary Increases to Base







$3,939,920

1. Personnel Compensation and Benefits. The requested $2.1M provides funding for an estimated 1%
pay raise in FY 2014 as well as health benefit increases, effective January 2014, and has been
developed in accordance with OMB economic assumptions.

2. Non-salary increases. The requested $1.8M provides expected inflationary increases for space
rentals (GSA and non-GSA facilities), phones, utilities, printing and reproduction services,
contractual services, and supplies. These increases are developed in accordance with OMB
guidelines for projected inflationary costs (2.0%).



Other Increases to Base








$13,367,080

1. Additional Contract Services: $1,470,080


The Office of Inspector General (OIG) is requesting an additional $1,470,080. This baseline
increase provides the Inspector General funding for mandated requirements and recurring costs for
maintaining OIG information technology (IT) systems, software license, FCC CIO IT technical
support, other recurring costs, and for performing recurring oversight audits of FCC programs and
required investigational legal support.

2. Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP): $520,000


The Commission must provide for its mission-critical systems to be redundant and fully
operational in a Continuity of Operations (COOP) event. The Commission has many (over 20)
mission-critical IT systems and is taking an on-going review, starting with the highest priority
ones, to determine what actions are needed to be fully operational in such an event. In the past two
years the FCC has assessed two of its most important mission-critical systems, the Universal
Licensing System (ULS) and the Office of Engineering and Technology’s Frequency Assignment
System (OFACS).


The ULS is an interactive licensing database system used to track wireless licenses and to process
and approve new applications, including emergency applications during disasters. This system is
used for both commercial and public safety licenses. The ULS enables the FCC, public safety
frequency coordinators, and the public to efficiently search for application and license information.
The OFACS is also essential for the conduct of the FCC’s spectrum management and coordination
responsibilities. OFACS enables FCC spectrum personnel to access all major FCC spectrum
license databases and to provide frequency assignment records to the National
Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), our primary partner in the conduct
of the Nation’s spectrum management activities.


In order for the Commission to conduct its regular business in emergencies, ULS and OFACS must
be capable of operating at both Commission headquarters and at the Commission's COOP site.
ULS and OFACS are especially important during major disasters when the FCC receives numerous
special requests for emergency use of radio systems and spectrum that must be processed rapidly to
address safety of life and communications recovery issues.
- 11 -





Maintaining ULS and OFACS in emergency situations is particularly important because licensees
frequently require issuance of Special Temporary Authority (STA) during emergencies to address
recovery issues. ULS and OFACS also provide contact information that assists recovery agencies
in reaching out to licensees.

3. Public Safety Answering Points (PSAP) Do Not Call Registry: $500,000


Section 6507 of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 requires the FCC to
create a Do-Not-Call registry for telephone numbers used by Public Safety Answering Points
(PSAPs), and to prohibit the use of automatic dialing equipment to contact those numbers. PSAPs
are facilities that have been designated to receive emergency calls and route them to emergency
service personnel. On May 22, 2012, the FCC released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking initiating
a proceeding to create such a registry. Under the statute, verified PSAP administrators or managers
must be able to place onto the PSAP registry telephone numbers that are used for the provision of
emergency services or for communications between public safety agencies. The FCC requests
$500,000 for FY 2014 in order to provide operation and maintenance on an annual basis. The FCC
has also requested $1,000,000 as a one-time initiative for PSAP in FY 2014.

4. Support for Reforms of the Universal Service Fund Support Programs $10,877,000

This request will support the Commission’s work to modernize and reform the Universal Service
Fund (USF) Support programs. Since 2009, the Commission has taken major steps to modernize
the four USF support programs with a particular emphasis on improving broadband connectivity
nationwide. In 2010, the Commission undertook fundamental reform of the rural portion of the
USF program to repurpose approximately $4.5 billion annually to provide broadband to all
Americans, including the more than 19 million unserved homes. In 2011, the Commission
reformed the Lifeline program, which provides basic phone service to low-income families,
realizing cost savings of more than $200 million in the past year and repurposing a portion of those
savings to initiate a pilot program to provide broadband to low-income families. Also in 2011, the
Commission undertook reform of the under-utilized program that provides broadband connectivity
to non-profit rural health care providers, allowing them to realize cost savings through increased
use of telemedicine under-utilized program. More resources are required to continue the
Commission’s work to modernize USF, implement reforms, and increase its oversight of the
newly-reformed programs. This request will support funding for additional staff including,
attorneys, economists, IT specialists, program managers, and technologists.

Decreases to Base

1. Decreases to Base $2,000,000: The FCC has taken steps to find efficiencies and savings when
possible. The $2M reflects where we have identified efficiencies and savings in travel,
telecommunications, contracts, and other expenses.

New Programmatic Performance Initiatives

1. Commission-wide Information Technology: $1,290,000

Storage Expansion ($1.290M): The FCC needs to expand the tiered enterprise storage solution
to include off-site external storage providers, lower cost storage servers, distributed file
- 12 -



systems, and off-site backup and replication technologies. The solution will be able to
seamlessly move and access data stored in multiple locations through multiple providers
without impacting the users or business applications in the Commission. The system will be
scalable at all levels and storage locations and provide for improved disaster recovery and
COOP capabilities.


2. Bureaus and Office: $6,520,000


Space Consolidation & Facilities Improvement ($4.8M)
: Consistent with a 2010 Executive
Order, the FCC is working to reduce lease arrangements that are not cost effective. The FCC’s
goal is to consolidate our two headquarters offices into one building and by doing so cut
significantly our lease expenditures. We recently completed a minor office consolidation that
resulted in an overall savings of approximately $1 million a year. Consolidating FCC
Headquarters personnel into one building is a much more expansive undertaking that will
involve architecture, design, furniture, facilities upgrades, and many other components. This
effort will eliminate the more than $2.7 million in annual rent paid for our Portals I facility, will
cut the FCC’s per employee expenditures on space, and will reduce dramatically unused and
inefficiently used space in our Portals II Headquarters facility.

Part of our Enforcement Bureau Field Operations, equipment, and staff are located at the FCC’s
Columbia, MD, campus in an historic farmhouse. If the FCC continues to house employees
and equipment in this facility, it must undergo a complete renovation. This extensive work
would require replacement of walls, ceilings, floors, mechanical and electrical systems,
furniture and other equipment. The farmhouse is a historical building, and as a result has
presented challenges to any efforts to upgrade the facility. Because of this special designation,
the age of the building, and the needs of the staff, renovating the farmhouse would be a
significant undertaking both in terms of staff time required and the finances needed to complete
the effort.

The HVAC system at the technology lab in Columbia, MD (the “Lab”), is operated by three
roof top HVAC units that were installed in 1989. The equipment has far surpassed its service
life expectancy of 15 years. There is no service agreement on these units. Over the past
several years, the system has experienced numerous breakdowns which have resulted in costly
repairs. In 2004, the FCC contracted with an engineering firm to conduct an assessment of
HVAC needs of the Lab. The assessment report recommended that the entire system be
replaced.

The Commission has a number of long outstanding high value capital improvement projects
that must be addressed. These include facilities upgrades to the Columbia, MD, location and
other field locations. Columbia, MD, upgrades needed include the following: security
upgrades for the electronic gate; energy efficiency upgrades for the OET technology lab;
construction of an aluminum carport for tractor; fence repair and tree removal; replacement of
carpeting; and replacement of office furniture. In certain field locations, the Commission also
needs to do the following: replace/repair falling gates and fences for security purposes; test and
upgrade fire alarm systems; repair roads to enable safe passage of vehicles; replace old
generator and diesel maintenance; install new locks on all doors; replace dilapidated front
- 13 -



doors; remove dangerous trees and re-landscape grounds; re-grade and repave facilities to
alleviate flooding; and replace carpet in multiple facilities.

Public Safety Answering Points (PSAP) Do Not Call Registry ($1.0M): Section 6507 of the
Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 requires the FCC to create a Do-Not-
Call registry for telephone numbers used by Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) and
prohibit the use of automatic dialing equipment to contact those numbers. PSAPs are facilities
that have been designated to receive emergency calls and route them to emergency service
personnel. On May 22, 2012, the FCC released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking initiating a
proceeding to create such a registry. Under the statute, verified PSAP administrators or
managers must be able to place onto the PSAP registry telephone numbers that are used for the
provision of emergency services or for communications between public safety agencies. The
FCC requests $2,000,000 for FY 2014 in order to execute contractual arrangements to build
and launch the registry. The FCC has also requested $500,000 as a base budget increase in the
FY 2014 budget.

Audit Related & Investigation ($770K): INSPECTOR GENERAL REFORM ACT of 2008;
122 STAT. 4302 PUBLIC LAW 110-409 - OCT. 14, 2008; Public Law 110-409; 110th
Congress (f)(1). For each fiscal year, an Inspector General shall transmit a budget estimate and
request to the head of the establishment or designated Federal entity to which the Inspector
General reports. The budget request shall specify the aggregate amount of funds requested for
such fiscal year for the operations of the Inspector General, and shall specify the amount
requested for all training needs, including a certification from the Inspector General that the
amount requested satisfies all training requirements for the Inspector General's office for that
fiscal year, and any resources necessary to support the Council of the Inspectors General on
Integrity and Efficiency shall be specifically identified and justified in the budget request.

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) FY 2014 budget request includes funds necessary to
perform regulatory and mandated audits, as well as several audit initiatives of FCC programs
that are a priority to OIG. These audits will strengthen OIG program and FCC operations
oversight.

In addition, the budget request contains funds for supporting ongoing and future litigation and
legal support. In recent years, working with the Department of Justice (DOJ), the OIG
investigative teams have produced a high volume of legal documents, data, and other litigation
support for cases referred to the DOJ. This increased case involvement improves the validity of
cases referred and assists DOJ in moving the case to prosecution. OIG needs contracted
support to meet the high volume and demand for litigation and legal support.


- 14 -



Economy Act Reimbursable Agreements


In FY 2012, the Commission earned approximately $5.4M in Economy Act Reimbursable
Agreements with other Federal agencies, of which the National Telecommunications
Information Administration (NTIA) holds the largest agreement in the amount of $2.8M. The
Commission has agreements ranging from $45K to $1.3M with other agencies such as
Broadcasting Board of Governors, Department of State, and Department of Justice, General
Services Administration, and many others. The Commission estimates that in FY 2013 and FY
2014, reimbursable agreements will total close to $6M per year.

- 15 -




















PERFORMANCE PLAN










FCC PERFORMANCE PLAN


OVERVIEW: FCC STRATEGIC GOALS - 2012 THROUGH 2016


As specified in section one of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, the FCC’s mission is to “make
available, so far as possible, to all the people of the United States, without discrimination on the basis of race,
color, religion, national origin, or sex, rapid, efficient, Nation-wide, and world-wide wire and radio
communication service with adequate facilities at reasonable charges.” 1 In addition, section one provides that
0F
the Commission was created “for the purpose of the national defense” and “for the purpose of promoting safety
of life and property through the use of wire and radio communications.”2 The FCC issued a new Strategic Plan
1F
for FY 2012 - 2016. The strategic goals and performance goals shown below reflect the new Plan.

Strategic Goal 1: Connect America


Maximize Americans’ access to – and the adoption of—affordable fixed and mobile broadband where
they live, work, and travel.

Strategic Goal 2: Maximize Benefits of Spectrum

Maximize the overall benefits of spectrum for the United States.

Strategic Goal 3: Protect and Empower Consumers


Empower consumers by ensuring that they have the tools and information they need to make informed
choices; protect consumers from harm in the communications market.

Strategic Goal 4: Promote Innovation, Investment, and America’s Global
Competitiveness

Promote innovation in a manner that improves the nation’s ability to compete in the global
economy, creating a virtuous circle that results in more investment and in turn enables
additional innovation.

Strategic Goal 5: Promote Competition


Ensure a competitive market for communications and media services to foster innovation,
investment, and job creation and to ensure consumers have meaningful choice in affordable
services.

Strategic Goal 6: Public Safety and Homeland Security


Promote the availability of reliable, interoperable, redundant, rapidly restorable critical
communications infrastructures that are supportive of all required services.

Strategic Goal 7: Advance Key National Purposes

Through international and national interagency efforts, advance the use of broadband for key national
purposes.

Strategic Goal 8: Operational Excellence


Make the FCC a model for excellence in government by effectively managing the Commission’s
human, information, and financial resources; by making decisions based on sound data and analyses;
and by maintaining a commitment to transparent and responsive processes that encourage public
involvement and best serve the public interest.


1 47 U.S.C. § 151.
2 Id.
- 16 -




WHAT THE FCC COMMITS TO ACCOMPLISH IN FY 2014


In carrying out its strategic goals, the FCC has identified the following outcomes it will strive to accomplish in
FY 2014. Each outcome is stated as a performance goal and each of the 27 outcome-focused performance goals
has associated performance targets.

When reviewing the information on the following pages, the reader should note that the FCC, through its
regulatory activities, influences numerous economic and social outcomes. However, since consumer choice,
technological innovation, economic conditions, and international negotiations can all have an effect on
outcomes, the FCC’s approach to connecting its strategic goals to its performance measures includes only those
factors within the FCC’s control.

CONNECT AMERICA



Performance Commitments and Metrics

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 1.1:

Maximize broadband adoption by promoting affordability and
removing other barriers to adoption by all Americans, including those with low incomes and disabilities.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Support and facilitate the development, deployment, and adoption of broadband services across
multiple platforms.
• Carry out rulemakings, spectrum reallocation, and license modifications as needed to ensure
that the growing demand for wireless broadband services, including satellite-delivered
broadband, is met.
• Expeditiously review and issue spectrum licenses to qualified auction winners, promoting the
expanded deployment of broadband services.
• Take concrete steps to increase broadband availability and innovative uses of broadband in
addressing critical national priorities.
• Complete the Broadband Adoption Lifeline Pilot Program and analyze project reports and data
gathered during pilot program.
• Initiate rulemakings and other actions as necessary to implement the statutory mandates of the
Public Safety Spectrum Act.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 1.2:

Maximize availability of fixed and mobile broadband to all
Americans and community anchor institutions, including in rural and insular areas and Tribal lands, while
ensuring that universal service programs are efficient, effective, and impose no greater burden on consumers and
businesses than necessary.

Target with a Subordinate Measure:


(1) Work in partnership with state, local, and tribal governments, consumer groups and industry to
promote broadband availability to all Americans, including consumers in rural and high cost areas
and individuals with disabilities.
• In coordination with state, local, and tribal governments, consumer and industry groups,
conduct outreach activities to educate the public concerning the Commission’s broadband
initiatives, including those promoting universal service.
• Work collaboratively across FCC Offices and Bureaus to identify and address Tribal and Native
Community communications issues, including barriers to entry that operate against Tribal
broadband deployment and adoption.
• Coordinate with other Federal Government agencies on rules and policies designed to achieve
access by people with disabilities to communications and information technologies.
• Convene the FCC Native Nations Broadband Task Force on at least a quarterly basis.
- 17 -



(2) Continue reform of the universal service program to reflect technological developments and
changes in the market.
(2) Oversee implementation of reforms resulting in disbursements from the Connect America Fund.
• Enhance access to broadband connectivity for health care providers through reform of Rural
Health Care universal service support mechanism.
(3) Promote and advance universal service through enforcement of the Commission’s rules governing
the Universal Service Fund.
• Promote and advance universal service by reviewing 100% of referrals from the Commission’s
Office of Inspector General and taking enforcement action where appropriate in cases of non-
compliance.
• Pursue complaints or other reports of fraud, waste, or abuse in the universal service programs.
• Report at least annually on USF enforcement actions.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 1.3:

Enable the private sector to accelerate the deployment and
expansion of broadband networks by minimizing regulatory and other barriers to broadband build out.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Employ strategies to encourage investment in networks and services by existing providers, while
encouraging participation in broadband markets by new and non-traditional participants.
• Initiate or complete rulemaking actions that provide opportunities for innovations in broadband
services.
• Coordinate with industry and academia to identify research opportunities and impediments
towards broadband deployment.
• Review and revise, as necessary, the Commission’s rules and policies to promote broadband
investment and innovation.
(2) Maintain efficient licensing and facilities siting processes to encourage and facilitate rapid
deployment of broadband infrastructure.
• Process 90% of routine license applications for wireless broadband services within 90 days of
receipt.
• Resolve in a timely fashion all communications tower and antenna siting issues that impede the
deployment of broadband infrastructure and services.
• Work with stakeholders to expand the reach and reduce the cost of broadband deployment by
improving government policies for access to rights of way and wireless facilities siting.
(3) Vigorously enforce policies and regulations that promote the deployment and adoption of all
broadband technologies, and defend those policies and regulations against legal challenges.
• Promote the availability of broadband to all Americans by taking action, in all appropriate
cases, consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, on consumer
inquiries and complaints received regarding broadband availability.
• Take enforcement action in appropriate cases to deter anti-competitive practices that could
affect the deployment of broadband technologies

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 1.4:

Measure and monitor the country’s progress on broadband.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Measure and report on progress towards the goals of ensuring that broadband is being deployed to
and adopted by all Americans in a reasonable and timely fashion.
• Monitor and, as appropriate, revise metrics for determining the extent to which broadband is
being deployed in a reasonable and timely fashion.
• Educate consumers about delivered speeds and performance of broadband networks and make
data publicly available to facilitate informed competitive service choices.


- 18 -



Means and Strategies for Accomplishing Performance


CONNECT AMERICA

Processes

Skills

Technology

 Rulemaking
 Understanding of relevant law
 Electronic Commission Lifecycle
 Enforcing the
 Ability to analyze competition
Agenda Tracking System
Communications Act and the
in broadband markets
(eCLAS)
Commission’s rules.
 Assessing likely scenarios for
 Universal Licensing System
 Industry analysis
convergence of varied
(ULS)
 Data collection
technologies
 Consumer Complaints
 Technology analysis
 Assessing technical feasibility
Management System (CCMS)
 Licensing
of emerging technologies
 Enforcement Bureau Automated
 Auctions
 Understanding of current
Tracking System (EBATS)
 Stakeholder outreach
technologies and their
 Electronic Document
respective markets
Management System (EDOCS)
 Auditing, investigating and
 Electronic Comment Filing
enforcing (including on-scene
System (ECFS)
investigative capability)
 Electronic Tariff Filing System

 International Bureau Filing
System (IBFS/MyIBFS)
 Fee Filer
 Desktop/Network Document
Development and Data Access
Tools
 Form 477 Data Collection System
 Tower Construction Notification
System
 OFACS (coordination database)
 FCC Auction System
 Electronic 106 Filing System (E-
106)
- 19 -



MAXIMIZE BENEFITS OF SPECTRUM



Performance Commitments and Metrics


Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 2.1:

Develop and implement flexible, market-oriented spectrum
allocation and assignment policies that promote innovation, investment, jobs and consumer benefits, including
ensuring meaningful availability of unlicensed spectrum.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Pursue spectrum allocation and license assignment policies to achieve the effective and efficient use
of spectrum.
• Conduct auctions of licenses for electromagnetic spectrum as directed through statutory
mandate or Commission decision.
• Complete transfer of all eligible auctions revenues to the U.S. Treasury within 30 days of
license grant.
• Provide opportunities for innovative and experimental use of spectrum.
• Coordinate frequency assignments and rulemakings with Federal agencies such as NTIA.
(2) Conduct effective and timely spectrum licensing and equipment authorization activities.
• Process 95% of routine spectrum license applications within 90 days of receipt.
• Process 95% of public safety spectrum license applications within 90 days of receipt
• Process 90% of applications for equipment approvals and experimental authorizations within 90
days of receipt.
• Take enforcement action in appropriate cases against violations of spectrum-related rules, such
as interference and unauthorized use of frequencies.
(3) Provide guidance and training to the recognized Telecommunications Certification Bodies (TCBs)
to review equipment authorization applications on a consistent basis.
a. Conduct at least two workshops and other training sessions.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 2.2:

Develop and implement policies that support highly efficient use
of spectrum.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Facilitate the deployment of new or existing services and devices that use spectrum efficiently and
effectively now and for the future.
• Review and revise, as necessary, the Commission’s spectrum allocation, auctions, licensing and
technical rules and establish policies that promote the development of new technologies and the
provision of new or improved terrestrial and satellite communication services.
• Develop Commission policies and adopt items that promulgate policies designed to increase
consumers’ competitive choices for broadband, domestic and international wireline and
wireless services, and multichannel video programming equipment and services.
• Review, process and resolve in a timely manner applications for transfer of control and
assignment of licenses, as well as applications to discontinue service.
• Analyze space station licensees’ compliance with system implementation milestones and take
action, where necessary, to make unused spectrum available to new applications.
(2) Enforce the Commission’s licensing and technical regulations, including limitations on power
outputs, antenna and tower height, and build-out requirements, to ensure that licensees and
operators of unlicensed devices are using spectrum efficiently and effectively.
• Continue an aggressive program of inspections and investigations by agents in the field to help
maximize compliance with the Commission’s licensing and technical requirements.
(3) Take enforcement action in appropriate cases against violations of spectrum-related rules, including
harmful interference and unauthorized operation.
• Conduct timely on-scene investigations to resolve instances of harmful interference and help
ensure the reliability of the communications infrastructure.
- 20 -



• Investigate and take appropriate enforcement action against “pirate” broadcasters and other
unlicensed operators, unauthorized operation and non-conform radio frequency equipment.
• Take concrete steps to investigate and limit disruptions to authorized spectrum users caused by
signal jamming devices.
• Conduct routine inspections and audits of radio facilities, cable systems, and antenna structures.
• Provide a reliable, close-in direction finding capability (i.e., the ability to locate sources of
harmful interference) for the civil sector.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 2.3:

Serve as a resource domestically and internationally on issues
involving use and management of our spectrum resources.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Actively participate in bilateral and multilateral global discussions and debate on issues in
coordination with other U.S. governmental agencies related to competition and universal access,
including access for people with disabilities.
• Participate in meetings and conferences with foreign regulators to foster competition in foreign
markets and promote universal service policies.
• Meet with NTIA and the Department of State as necessary to coordinate U.S. positions related
to competition and universal access, including access for people with disabilities.
• Negotiate harmful, cross-border interference issues relating to licensed radio systems operating
on the borders with Canada and Mexico.
(2) Maintain an efficient licensing process for international Section 214 authorizations and cable landing
licenses.
• Process 90% of streamlined Section 214 applications within 90 days; process 90% of non-
streamlined Section 214 applications within 292 days, except those applications pending over
292 days as a result of Executive Branch national security review.
• Process 90% of streamlined Submarine Cable Landing License applications within 180 days;
process 90% of non-streamlined Submarine Cable Landing License applications within 292
days, except those pending over 292 days as a result of Executive Branch national security
review.
(3) Encourage technological innovation in satellite-based technologies and the efficient use of spectrum.
• Continue to streamline and reform Part 25 rules and requirements to facilitate the rapid
deployment of satellite-based services and encourage technological innovation.
• Process earth station application within an average of 112 days.
• Process space station applications within an average of 270 days.
(4) Reform Commission policies and processes for reviewing foreign ownership in U.S. licensees:
• Carry out rulemaking proposing reforms.
(5) Coordinate with appropriate executive branch agencies international applications and petitions from
applicants having foreign ownership.
• Coordinate applications and petitions on a bi-weekly basis.


- 21 -



Means and Strategies for Accomplishing Performance


MAXIMIZE BENEFITS OF SPECTRUM

Processes

Skills

Technology

 Spectrum auctions
 Ability to plan and conduct
 FCC Auction System
 Rulemaking
auctions for limited spectrum
 International Bureau Filing
 Enforcing the
resources
System (IBFS/MyIBFS)
Communications Act and the
 Understanding economic and
 Experimental Licensing Filing
Commission’s rules.
technology aspects of the
System
 Industry analysis
telecommunications industry
 Universal Licensing System
 Data collections
 Perspective and innovative
(ULS)
 Licensing
thinking in order to encourage
 Enforcement Bureau Automated
 Engineering analysis
the best use of spectrum while
Tracking System (EBATS)
 Inter-governmental and
maintaining appropriate
 Electronic Commission Lifecycle
international negotiations
protections for public safety
Agenda Tracking System

and national security
(eCLAS)
 Auditing, investigating and
 Electronic Document
enforcing (including on-scene
Management System (EDOCS)
investigative capability)
 Electronic Comment Filing
 Forecasting changing needs of
System (ECFS)
and expectations toward
 Fee Filer
underserved groups
 Desktop/Network Document
 Understanding of relevant law
Development and Data Access

Tools
 KDB (OET Knowledge Data
Base)

- 22 -



PROTECT AND EMPOWER CONSUMERS



Performance Commitments and Metrics

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 3.1:

Promote transparency and disclosure.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Ensure that FCC policy, rulemaking, and enforcement documents clearly explain the basis for
decisions to Congress, key constituencies, and the public.
• Decision documents will cite relevant facts and data, and sources for that information, to convey
the basis for decisions.
(2) Support and encourage policies and regulations to ensure that consumers receive consistent
treatment and protections across technologies and platforms, and across FCC bureaus and offices.
• Review and recommend revisions, as necessary, to the Commission’s enforcement and
consumer protection rules and policies.
• Utilize advisory committees, task forces, and intergovernmental groups to foster
communications and coordination with industry representatives, consumer groups, and
representatives of other governmental entities.
• Review and revise, as necessary, FCC consumer publications.
• Foster collaborative efforts across all FCC bureaus and offices to promote consistent treatment
and protections across technologies and platforms in Commission proceedings.
• Review carrier tariff filings for compliance with Commission rules and statutory requirements.
(3) Inform the public about enforcement issues.
• Use Enforcement Advisories and the agency’s website to educate consumers and FCC
regulatees about FCC requirements and the associated penalties for violation of those
requirements.
(4) Evaluate and report on consumer complaints regarding communications services.
• Make information publicly available about the top subject areas for consumer inquiries and
complaints filed with the Commission, including the number and type of consumer complaints.
• Report to Congress on the level of compliance with the communications provisions of the
Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act and the extent to which
accessibility barriers continue to exist for persons with disabilities.
(5) Promote an environment in which consumers have a positive, efficient and effective experience
with the Commission's call centers and website.
• Review call center and website trends and make enhancements and improvements, as necessary,
to increase consumer awareness of the rights of consumers in the competitive communications
marketplace.
• Continue implementation of system and process enhancements for the Commission’s complaint
and inquiries system and database to increase their efficiency and effectiveness.
• Continue implementation of system and process enhancements to the Commission’s website,
including launch of the first FCC mobile site.
(6) Ensure that individuals and organizations have maximum opportunities for civic engagement to
provide information, data and opinions concerning FCC matters across a wide array of information
gathering platforms.
• Further enhance the FCC’s web presence and social media environment to provide information
and involve more entities in the decision making process.
• Use workshops, focus groups and other means to solicit input to improve public participation.
• Test and, where appropriate, implement new applications to enhance the public’s involvement
and experience with engaging the FCC.
• Convene the Consumer Advisory Committee at least twice by 9/30/14.
• Convene the Intergovernmental Advisory Committee at least twice by 9/30/14.
- 23 -



Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 3.2:

Act swiftly and consistently in the use of enforcement authority
to protect consumers.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Enforce the Commission's policies that promote the competitive provisions of the Communications
Act of 1934, as amended, and the Commission’s rules, and defend against legal challenges.
• Ensure that consumers realize the benefits of competition by compiling a complete record and
working toward resolution of all formal complaints within one year.
• Promote competition in the communications industry by taking action, where appropriate,
consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines on all complaints filed with
the FCC alleging violations of the competition provisions of the Act and the Commission’s
rules.
• Promote the integrity of the communications infrastructure by taking action, where appropriate,
consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, on complaints alleging
violations of the Commission’s equipment marketing rules.
• Process 100% of slamming complaints filed with the Commission within 30 days of receipt.
(2) Ensure, through enforcement action and litigation where necessary, that consumers are protected
from anticompetitive practices and other practices that are harmful to consumers.
• Maximize compliance with the Commission’s Customer Proprietary Network Information
(CPNI) rules by reviewing annual CPNI Compliance Filings and taking enforcement action
where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, against
(1) those carriers’ filings identified as non-compliant with the Communications Act or the
Commission’s rules, and (2) those carriers that did not file annual CPNI Compliance Filings.
• Deter business practices that are in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act
(TCPA) Act by taking action, where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of
limitation and other deadlines, on complaints alleging violation of the Commission’s rules
addressing Do-Not-Call telephone solicitation requirements and restrictions on the use of pre-
recorded advertising messages, as well as provisions governing telemarketing and the use of
calling equipment.
• Ensure continued viability of Telecommunications Relay Services for persons with disabilities
by taking action, where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitations and other
deadlines, on all allegations and complaints referred to the Enforcement Bureau.
• Maximize compliance with the Commission’s rules governing the North American Numbering
Plan Administration and Local Number Portability Administration by taking action, where
appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, on all
allegations and complaints referred to the Enforcement Bureau.
• Deter and penalize unjust and unreasonable practices that harm consumers, such as
“cramming,” by taking action, where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of
limitation and other deadlines, on all allegations and complaints referred to the Enforcement
Bureau.
• Enforce Commission policy in response to anti-competitive conduct in international markets,
including disruption of traffic by foreign carriers by taking action, where appropriate, consistent
with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, on all allegations and complaints
referred to the Enforcement Bureau.
• Maximize compliance with the Commission’s Hearing Aid Compatibility rules by reviewing
manufacturers’ and service providers’ compliance filings and taking enforcement action where
appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitations and other deadlines, against (1)
companies whose filings identify them as being out of compliance with the Commission’s rules,
and (2) companies that fail to make the required filings.
(3) Engage consumers through outreach and education initiatives to facilitate informed choice in the
telecommunications and media marketplace.
• Develop Commission rules and policies to ensure that new technologies and services are
accessible to persons with disabilities.
- 24 -



• Continue to promote broad awareness of FCC’s accessibility rules and forfeitures associated
with violations of these rules to increase business and consumer awareness of the rights of
consumers and need to ensure that persons with disabilities have access to a variety of video
programming, and communications products and services.
• Monitor and maintain clearinghouse database of accessible products and services.
• Continue to promote consumer and business community awareness of legal requirements,
penalties, and agency enforcement action associated with violations of the TCPA and the
Commission’s consumer protection rules to increase business and consumer awareness of the
consequences of such violations.
• Respond to 100% of consumer complaints concerning TCPA violations within 20 days of
receipt.
• Monitor and maintain a web portal disclosing wireless carrier alert procedures to prevent bill
shock.
• Respond to 100% of non-TCPA consumer complaints and inquiries within 30 days.
(4) Ensure that the provisions of Section 716 of the Communications Act covering advance
communication services are effectively applied to the broad range of evolving communication
services.
• Ensure that persons with disabilities and other covered populations have access to these critical
communication services.
(5) Promote access to advanced telecommunications services and the public safety and convenience
benefits of modern communications technology by consumers with hearing loss.
• Take enforcement action in appropriate cases, consistent with statutes of limitation and other
deadlines, against violations of the Commission’s hearing aid-compatible digital wireless
handset deployment requirements.
• Take enforcement action in appropriate cases, consistent with statutes of limitation and other
deadlines, against violations of the Commission’s television captioning requirements.
(6) Coordinate information about the Commission’s consumer protection and enforcement policies and
practices with state and federal regulatory agencies and law enforcement agencies and encourage
cooperation, when appropriate.
• Provide information concerning policies and practices to multiple state and federal regulatory
agencies.
• Work collaboratively with local and state government entities concerning policies and practices
in response to consumer concerns regarding provision of telecommunications services.
• Work collaboratively with federal government agencies (such as the Federal Trade
Commission) regarding strategies for identifying and addressing consumer issues involving
telecommunications services.
• Coordinate with other federal government agencies on rules and policies designed to achieve
access by persons with disabilities to communications and information technologies.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 3.3:

Develop and maintain policies that encourage variety in media
programming sources and services for consumers.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Support the development of, enforce, and defend against legal challenge, media rules and policies
that comply with judicial directives and statutory requirements.
• Develop appropriate rules, policies, and licensing procedures for the effective provision of
broadcast television and radio as well as for cable and satellite television service.
• Promote competition, diversity and localism in Commission rulemaking items concerning
media ownership and the distribution of video programming.
• Ensure that video programming continues to be accessible to all Americans, including persons
with disabilities.
• Work collaboratively across FCC Offices and Bureaus to examine and assess video description
issues and requirements, particularly with respect to impact on persons with disabilities.
- 25 -



(1) Timely resolve adjudicatory proceedings involving cable television, broadcast television and radio,
and satellite services, and defend those decisions against legal challenge.
• Deter violations of sponsorship requirements and payola violations by taking action, where
appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitations and other deadlines, on all new
complaints alleging violations of the sponsorship identification or payola provisions.
• Deter violations of the Commission’s rules governing assignments and transfers of control by
taking action, where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other
deadlines, on all allegations and complaints referred to the Enforcement Bureau.
• Deter violations of the Commission’s other media-related rules, including those governing
broadcast of telephone conversations, contests, and public inspection files, by taking action,
where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, on all
allegations and complaints referred to the Enforcement Bureau.
• Ensure competition and diversity in the market for video programming through timely
resolution of adjudications regarding the agreements and related practices between
Multichannel Video Programming Distributors (MVPDs) and video programming providers.
• Work to ensure compliance with the Commission’s captioning rules.
(2) Ensure that broadcasters and cable operators comply with requirements of the Children’s Television
Act and the Commission’s rules regarding children’s educational television.
• Ensure compliance with core programming guidelines and commercial time limitations by
taking action, where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitations and other
deadlines, on all new complaints alleging violations.

Means and Strategies for Accomplishing Performance


PROTECT AND EMPOWER CONSUMERS

Processes

Skills

Technology

 Rulemaking
 Understanding of various
 Electronic Commission Lifecycle
 Enforcing the
communications marketplaces
Agenda Tracking System
Communications Act and the
 Consumer and public education
(eCLAS)
Commission’s rules.
 Understanding of economic and  Universal Licensing System
 Industry monitoring and
legal impacts of converging
(ULS)
analysis
media technologies
 Consumer Complaints
 Consumer protection
 Ability to analyze economic
Management System (CCMS)
 Interactions with state and
impact of industry performance
 Enforcement Bureau Automated
international regulators.
 Auditing, investigating and
Tracking System (EBATS)
 Formal complaints and
enforcing (including on-scene
 Electronic Tariff Filing System
mediation
investigative capability)
(ETFS)
 Stakeholder outreach
 Understanding of relevant law
 Electronic Document
Management System (EDOCS)
 Electronic Comment Filing
System (ECFS)
 International Bureau Filing
System (IBFS/MyIBFS)
 Fee Filer
 Desktop/Network Document
Development and Data Access
Tools
 Form 655 Hearing Aid
Compatibility Reporting System
- 26 -



PROMOTE INNOVATION, INVESTMENT, AND AMERICA’S


GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS



Performance Commitments and Metrics

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 4.1:

Foster international engagement and cooperation on
communications policy issues, including the broadband innovation initiative and free flow of data across
borders.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Help promote global broadband infrastructure deployment and adoption.
• Work domestically and internationally to identify possible additional spectrum bands for
globally harmonized allocations for mobile broadband.
• Collaborate with U.S. government agencies and international organizations on global initiatives
to highlight innovative broadband deployment and adoption policies, such as ensuring
broadband networks are able to be incorporated into new infrastructure projects.
(2) Support the U.S. government’s efforts to facilitate the free flow of data across borders.
• Work with the Department of State, the Department of Commerce, and the Office of the U.S.
Trade Representative to facilitate the interoperability of national/regional networks.
• Collaborate with other nations on developing ways to facilitate the free flow of data across
borders.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 4.2:

Advocate U.S. spectrum interests in the international arena.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Secure international spectrum allocations that allow for new services and protect incumbent
services from interference.
• As appropriate, coordinate and implement action items as adopted at the World Radio
Conference (WRC) 2012.
• Prepare materials and participate in international meetings to secure spectrum and satellite
positions as well as minimize interference issues between services through advocacy of U.S.
positions.
(2) Secure and enforce bi-lateral spectrum treaties and agreements working with appropriate U.S. and
international government agencies.
• Prepare detailed technical analyses and effectively represent the U.S. in bi-lateral negotiations
and coordination activities.
• Perform all technical analysis as necessary to ensure compliance with applicable provisions of
bilateral and International Telecommunication Union (ITU) agreements and treaties.
(3) Secure treaty on international telecommunications regulation that provides flexibility for the
Internet and other new services.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 4.3:
Preserve the free and open Internet as a platform for economic
growth, innovation, job-creation, and global competitiveness.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Adopt, enforce and defend against legal challenge to policies and rules that protect Internet freedom
and openness and promote robust innovation and investment throughout the broadband ecosystem.
• Ensure that consumers and innovators have clear and complete information to enable them to
make informed choices in choosing networks, devices and services.
• Ensure that consumers and innovators can send and receive lawful traffic and use the devices of
their choice.
• Ensure that consumers and innovators are protected from unreasonable discrimination.
• Compile a complete record and work toward resolution of all formal complaints involving open
Internet-related allegations within one year.
- 27 -



• Monitor informal complaints involving open Internet-related allegations, and open an
investigation in appropriate cases when there is evidence of a pattern of violations.


Means and Strategies for Accomplishing Performance

PROMOTE INNOVATION, INVESTMENT, AND AMERICA’S GLOBAL

COMPETITIVENESS

Processes

Skills

Technology

 Rulemaking
 Understanding of various
 Electronic Commission Lifecycle
 Enforcing the
communications marketplaces
Agenda Tracking System
Communications Act and the
 Understanding of economic and
(eCLAS)
Commission’s rules.
legal impacts of converging
 Universal Licensing System
 Industry monitoring and
media technologies
(ULS)
analysis
 Ability to analyze economic
 International Bureau Filing
 Data collection and analysis
impact of industry behavior
System (IBFS/MyIBFS)
 Licensing
 Understanding technological
 Consumer Complaints
 Technology analysis
advancement and establishing
Management System (CCMS)
 Formal complaints and
an environment that promotes it
 Consumer Information
mediation
 Auditing, investigating and
Management System (CIMS)
 Stakeholder outreach
enforcing(including on-scene
 Enforcement Bureau Automated
investigative capability)
Tracking System (EBATS)
 Understanding of relevant law
 Electronic Tariff Filing System

(ETFS)
 Electronic Document
Management System (EDOCS)
 Electronic Comment Filing
System (ECFS)
 Fee Filer
 Desktop/Network Document
Development and Data Access
Tools
 Equipment Authorization System
 Experimental Licensing System
 OFACS (coordination database)
 KDB (OET Knowledge Data
Base)
- 28 -



PROMOTE COMPETITION



Performance Commitments and Metrics

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 5.1:

Ensure effective policies are in place to promote and protect
competition for the benefit of consumers, including appropriate interconnection policies for communications
networks.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Promote competitive choices for wireless, satellite, and wireline voice and data service providers,
for domestic and international services and for multichannel video programming.
• Adopt policies that increase competition for communications services, resulting in greater value
and lower costs for consumers.
• Develop Commission policies and adopt items designed to increase consumers’ competitive
choices for broadband voice and data, and multichannel video programming equipment and
services.
• Review carrier tariff filings for compliance with Commission rules and statutory requirements.
• Promote compliance with rules by taking enforcement action in appropriate cases.
(2) Evaluate and report on the competitive environment for communications services.
• Develop and publish reports on competition in the telecommunications, broadcast, cable,
commercial wireless, and satellite industries by deadlines established in legislation or
Commission policy.
(3) Adopt, enforce and defend policies and rules that enhance access to communications services for
persons with disabilities.
• Ensure continued viability of Telecommunications Relay Services (TRS) for persons with
disabilities by taking action, where appropriate, on all new allegations referred to the
Enforcement Bureau, consistent with applicable statutes of limitations and other deadlines.
• Monitor and assess the program for distribution of specialized customer premises equipment
designed to make telecommunications and related services accessible by individuals who are
deaf-blind.
• Address 100% of the allegations or complaints of violations of the Commission’s rules on relay
services, closed captioning, Section 255 and hearing aid compatibility.
• Work closely with the TRS Fund Administrator to ensure that minutes of use submitted for
reimbursement are legitimate and entitled to reimbursement.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 5.2:

Promote pro-competitive and universal access policies
worldwide.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Actively participate in bilateral and multilateral global discussions and debate on issues in
coordination with other U.S. governmental agencies related to communications policy.
• Participate in meetings and conferences with foreign regulators to foster sound communications
policies.
• Meet with NTIA and the Department of State as necessary to coordinate U.S. positions related
to those policies.
• Work with U.S. government agencies and foreign regulators to promote international trade
policies for telecommunications services and equipment, e.g., Mutual Recognition Agreements
for telecommunications product approval.
(2) Work with other U.S. government agencies to participate in international studies that track the
status of global communications.
• Provide input, edits and comments in a timely manner for policy papers, best practices
guidelines, studies and statistical reports.
(3) Support and facilitate the deployment of satellite systems.
- 29 -



• Initiate rulemakings that adopt technical and service rules for licensing new satellite space and
earth station facilities that will provide innovative satellite-based services and permit the more
efficient use of spectrum resources.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 5.3:
Ensure expeditious and thorough review of proposed
transactions to ensure they serve the public interest.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Adhere to policies and processes for transaction review that are transparent and uniform across the
FCC’s Bureaus and Offices.
• Review, process and resolve applications for transfer of control and assignment of licenses in a
timely manner.
• Cite relevant facts and sources and convey the basis for decisions in all merger and transaction
decision documents.
(2) Maximize compliance with conditions imposed in approving transactions.
• Take action in appropriate cases to enforce merger conditions, consistent with statutes of
limitation and other deadlines.

Means and Strategies for Accomplishing Performance



PROMOTE COMPETITION

Processes

Skills

Technology

 Rulemaking
 Understanding of various
 Electronic Commission Lifecycle
 Enforcing the
communications marketplaces
Agenda Tracking System
Communications Act and the
 Understanding of economic and
(eCLAS)
Commission’s rules.
legal impacts of converging
 Universal Licensing System
 Industry monitoring and
media technologies
(ULS)
analysis
 Ability to analyze economic
 International Bureau Filing
 Data collection and analysis
impact of industry behavior
System (IBFS/MyIBFS)
 Licensing
 Understanding technological
 Consumer Complaints
 Technology analysis
advancement and establishing
Management System (CCMS)
an environment that promotes it
 Consumer Information
 Auditing, investigating and
Management System (CIMS)
enforcing (including on-scene
 Enforcement Bureau Automated
investigative capability)
Tracking System (EBATS)
 Understanding of relevant law
 Electronic Tariff Filing System
(ETFS)
 Electronic Document
Management System (EDOCS)
 Electronic Comment Filing
System (ECFS)
 Fee Filer
 Desktop/Network Document
Development and Data Access
Tools
 Equipment Authorization System
 Experimental Licensing System
 OFACS (coordination database)
 KDB (OET Knowledge Data
Base)
- 30 -



PUBLIC SAFETY AND HOMELAND SECURITY



Performance Commitments and Metrics

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 6.1:

Promote access to effective communications services, including
next generation services, in emergency situations across a range of platforms by public safety, health, defense,
and other emergency personnel, as well as all consumers in need.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Enhance communications and media network reliability, including emergency preparedness and
disaster management practices.
• Ensure that communications are available during emergencies and crises by pursuing network
outage reporting enforcement actions.
• Participate in international meetings, conferences, and activities to promote the continued
reliability of the global communications infrastructure.
• Promote Next Generation 911 and Text to 911 in order to enhance the ability of consumers to
request assistance in times of emergencies.
• Coordinate and work collaboratively across FCC Offices and Bureaus on rulemaking items
regarding accessibility of emergency information to persons with disabilities.
• Monitor and assess specialized Do-Not-Call Registry for Public Safety Answering Points.
(2) Facilitate participation in the Wireless Priority Service (WPS) Program.
• Work closely with the Department of Homeland Security to increase participation in the WPS
program by federal, state, local, and tribal governments as well as first responder organizations.
(3) Facilitate participation in the Telecommunications Service Priority (TSP) Program.
• Work closely with the Department of Homeland Security to increase participation in the TSP
program by federal, state, local, and tribal governments as well as 911 call centers and first
responder organizations.
(4) Increase awareness of the Commission’s public safety activities.
• Convene periodic public summits on topics of critical importance, providing outreach to first
responders and the public safety community in general.
(5) Gather and disseminate public safety communications information.
o Coordinate with NTIA, DHS and other Federal entities as appropriate to facilitate and support
the deployment of a nationwide wireless public safety broadband network as contemplated
under the Public Safety Spectrum Act.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 6.2:

Evaluate and strengthen measures for protecting the nation’s
critical communications infrastructure and facilitate rapid restoration of the U.S. communications infrastructure
and facilities after disruption by any cause, including cyberattacks.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Promote construction of nationwide, interoperable broadband public safety capabilities.
• Adopt and implement Commission rules that would effectuate the deployment and operation of
a common, interoperable broadband infrastructure for America’s first responders.
(2) Take appropriate enforcement action for non-compliance with 911 and E911 requirements and
defend the Commission’s VoIP and 911 and E911 rules in litigation.
• Maximize compliance with the Commission's rules governing the nationwide availability of
E911 solutions to ensure that consumers have access to advanced public safety services in an
emergency by reviewing carrier compliance reports and taking enforcement action where
appropriate, consistent with statutes of limitation and other deadlines.
• Promote compliance with the Commission’s rules by taking action, where appropriate,
consistent with applicable statutes of limitations and other deadlines, on all new complaints and
referrals concerning the Commission’s 911 and E911 rules.
(3) Improve the effectiveness of an Emergency Alert System (EAS) and the Commercial Mobile
Alerting System (CMAS).
- 31 -



• Promote actions to expand EAS to users of additional communications technologies and media.
• Meet at least quarterly with FEMA and other relevant agencies regarding EAS and CMAS
operational issues and potential improvements.
• Promote compliance with the Commission’s EAS rules by taking enforcement action, where
appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, on all new
complaints and referrals.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 6.3:
Implement, maintain and conduct exercises for the FCC’s
Continuity of Operations Plans (COOP) and Emergency Preparedness Plans and act swiftly in matters affecting
public safety, homeland security, and disaster management.
Targets with Subordinate Measures:
(1) Establish COOP and emergency preparedness procedures to ensure accuracy, improve
effectiveness, and create a better state of readiness.
• Annually update the COOP Plan for the agency
• Annually update the Devolution Plan for the agency.
• Annually update the Pandemic Plan for the agency.
• Provide for the acquisition of resources necessary for continuity of operations on an emergency
basis for up to 30 days or until normal operations can be resumed.
• Annually exercise the agency’s COOP, Devolution, and Pandemic Plans.
• Draft After Action Reports after exercises in order to improve the agency’s preparedness for
future events.
(2) Identify and provide continuity funding and specific budgetary guidance for all FCC bureaus and
offices.
• Use a risk assessment methodology to identify, prioritize, and justify the allocation of continuity
budgetary resources.
• Integrate continuity budgeting in multi-year strategic planning with performance linked to
established objectives and metrics.
• Budget for continuity requirements in accordance with NSPD-51/HSPD-20 and the National
Communications System Directive 3-10 (Continuity Communications) as applicable.
(3) Preserve the integrity of the communications infrastructure relating to public safety by taking action
on 100% of complaints of interference to public safety communications within one day.
• Complaints of interference to public safety communications will receive top priority in 100% of
cases.
(4) Ensure that communications are available during emergencies and crises by conducting cable signal
leakage inspections to minimize harmful interference to aviation and public safety frequencies and
investigating unlicensed and unauthorized radio operations.
• Report annually on the number of cable signal leakage inspections.
• Maximize compliance and enhance public safety by taking enforcement action where
appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, against parties
alleged to have violated the Commission’s cable signal leakage rules.
• Take enforcement action, where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitation
and other deadlines, against parties alleged to have violated the Commission’s statutory
licensing requirements.
(5) During crises, work closely with our federal partners such as FEMA and the Department of
Homeland Security to provide situational awareness data from the Disaster Information Reporting
System (DIRS) or data derived from the operation of Project Roll Call equipment.
• Provide all staff resources necessary during crises to gather and provide data from DIRS and
Project Roll Call.
(6) Protect the safety of aviation and the general public by enforcing the Commission’s licensing and
technical regulations governing radio facilities, operations, and antenna structures, including
specifications on power outputs, antenna location, painting, lighting and tower height, and build-out
requirements.
- 32 -



• Continue an aggressive program of inspections and investigations by agents in the field to help
maximize compliance with the Commission’s licensing and technical requirements
• Take action, where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other
deadlines, against parties alleged to have violated the Commission’s rules governing technical
rules and technical authorizations.

Means and Strategies for Accomplishing Performance

PUBLIC SAFETY AND HOMELAND SECURITY

Processes

Skills

Technology

 Rulemaking
 Knowledge of federal and state
 Network Outage Reporting
 Enforce the Communications
public safety and emergency
System (NORS)
Act and the Commission’s
procedures.
 Disaster Information Reporting
rules.
 Understanding of national
System (DIRS)
 Data collection and analysis
defense operations.
 DIRS Lite
 Intergovernmental and
 Facilitation and communication  E-911/Wireless E-911
international negotiations
skills necessary to increase
 Emergency Alert System (EAS)
 Communications and Crisis
awareness of numerous
 Wireless Priority Access System
Management Center
emergency services and plans.
(WPAS)
 National Communications
 Risk assessment.
 Electronic Commission Lifecycle
System (NCS)
 Auditing, investigating and
Agenda Tracking System
 Government Emergency
enforcing (including on-scene
(eCLAS)
Telecommunications Service
investigative capability)
 Universal Licensing System
(GETS)
 Understanding of relevant law
(ULS)
 Telecommunications Service
 International Bureau Filing
Priority System (TSP)
System (IBFS/MyIBFS)
 Continuity of Operations
 Enforcement Bureau Automated
Plan (COOP)
Tracking System (EBATS)

 Electronic Document
Management System (EDOCS)
 Electronic Comment Filing
System (ECFS)
 Fee Filer
 Desktop/Network Document
Development and Data Access
Tools
 Electronic Tariff Filing System
(ETFS)
 Project Roll Call equipment and
vehicles
- 33 -



ADVANCE KEY NATIONAL PURPOSES



Performance Commitments and Metrics

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 7.1:

Promote and facilitate the use of broadband to address key
national challenges, including health care, education, energy, and e-government.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Support and facilitate the increased use of broadband across key national purposes.
• Support the use of broadband to advance national purposes in rulemakings by promoting
innovative and flexible uses of both wired and wireless broadband technology.
• Support the use of broadband to advance national purposes through other means, such as by
facilitating public and private partnerships across industry, government, and nonprofit
organizations.
• Enhance access to broadband connectivity for health care providers through reform of the Rural
Health Care universal service support mechanism.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 7.2:

Ensure that small businesses have the access to broadband and
other communications tools needed to drive innovation and economic growth.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Support and facilitate wired and wireless deployment and competition to ensure that small
businesses have robust broadband connectivity and meaningful choice of broadband services.
• Promote deployment of broadband services, both wired and wireless, to all small businesses
across the country through continued regulatory reforms.
• Promote competition across broadband service providers, including wired and wireless
technologies, by facilitating competition and market entry.

Means and Strategies for Accomplishing Performance

ADVANCE KEY NATIONAL PRIORITIES

Processes

Skills

Technology

 Rulemaking
 Understanding of relevant law
 Electronic Commission Lifecycle
 Enforce the Communications  Understanding of both
Agenda Tracking System
Act and the Commission’s
economic and technical aspects
(eCLAS)
rules.
of the telecommunications
 Universal Licensing System
 Industry analysis
industry, both domestically and
(ULS)
 Data collection
internationally.
 International Bureau Filing
 Licensing
 Forecasting changing needs of
System (IBFS/MyIBFS)
 Engineering
and expectations toward
 Consumer Complaints
 Inter-governmental and
underserved groups
Management System (CCMS)
international negotiations
 Ability to analyze economic
 Enforcement Bureau Automated
impact of industry performance
Tracking System (EBATS)

 Electronic Document
Management System (EDOCS)
 Electronic Comment Filing
System (ECFS)
 Form 477 Data Collection System
 Tower Construction Notification
System
 Electronic 106 Filing System (E-
106)
 OFACS (coordination database)

- 34 -




OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE



Performance Commitments and Metrics

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 8.1:

Effectively manage the FCC’s information technology resources
by maintaining secure systems that meet the needs of both the FCC and the system users.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Improve Commission systems to make information readily available to agency management for
decision making.
• Ensure that internal information systems provide timely and easily accessible data to FCC
managers.
(2) Upgrade and enhance technology and tools used by Commission staff to carry out the agency’s
mission.
• Provide FCC staff with information technology hardware, systems and training to create an
efficient and effective workforce.
• Continue developing custom-adapted investigative tools that enable the FCC to timely resolve
interference and take appropriate enforcement action across a wide range of services.
• Provide FCC staff with a secure digital infrastructure and maintain a high level of cyber
security readiness and presence.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 8.2:

Effectively manage the human resources of the FCC in order to
ensure sufficient resources and knowledge to handle the FCC’s workload.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Develop targeted skills and competencies for FCC employees through appropriate career
development aligned with the Commission’s strategic goals.
• Provide a robust selection of training opportunities for Commission employees and encourage
employee participation.
• Continue reevaluation and implementation of the FCC’s Strategic Human Capital plan.
(2) Improve Commission Senior Executive Service Plans.
• Continue to improve development of performance plans aligned with the Commission’s
Strategic Plan and the latest Office of Personnel Management and other government-wide
agency directives.
(3) Upgrade and enhance personnel management processes and tools to speed delivery of services.
• Provide streamlined and modernized processes to speed up and simplify the lifecycle work
career for employees (recruitment to departures).
(6) Reduce or eliminate under-representation in the workforce by recruiting and employing a highly-
skilled, competent, and diverse workforce, free of discrimination, reprisal, and sexual harassment.
• Ensure that statutory and legal requirements are met for discrimination complaints processing,
affirmative employment, reasonable accommodation, and accessibility
• Monitor agency compliance with various Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
and Office of Personnel Management policy directives, such as EEOC Management Directive
715, which provides guidance for Federal managers to ensure that all employment decisions are
free of discrimination
• Continue to plan and coordinate annual “Special Emphasis Programs” designed to educate FCC
employees on diverse cultures.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 8.3:

Effectively manage the FCC’s financial resources to best achieve
the FCC’s mission and to maintain internal controls that ensure sound budgeting, financial, and fund
management and accounting principles and practices.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


- 35 -



(1) Continue development and reevaluation of the budget cycle process to improve funding of current
and new Commission critical projects and programs.
• Maintain a robust process for reviewing funding of ongoing and future projects to meet
Commission strategic goals.
(2) Conduct a program of continuous review and evaluation to assure that all financial operations and
programs are helping control or contain costs, providing high quality customer service, and
improving the effectiveness and efficiency of Commission operations.
• Maintain an effective internal controls program that complies with all applicable laws and
regulations to ensure proper stewardship of Federal resources. Promptly respond to and
remediate identified risks, operational weaknesses, and internal control deficiencies that warrant
correction.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 8.4:

Effectively manage the FCC’s administrative and management
program resources to provide for the appropriate support for all of the FCC’s activities and to maintain internal
controls that allow for sound facility, equipment, and security expenditures.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Promote greater accountability by strengthening performance management and administrative
controls.
• Collect and assess administrative cost data to use in making decisions on effectiveness and
allocation of resources.
• Collect performance data for FCC managers to use in making decisions concerning program
effectiveness and allocation of resources.
• Conduct internal risk assessments of all administrative and management programs and develop
remediation plans through a lifecycle approach.
• Review audits and evaluations from the Office of Inspector General and address recommended
improvements in FCC operations and functions.
(2) Ensure compliance with all general administrative laws and regulations, including fiscal,
procurement, ethics, employment, environmental, and appropriations.
(3) Continue improvement in contracts, procurement, and purchasing programs and activities.
• Meet or exceed the Small Business Administration (SBA) contracting set-aside goal.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 8.5:

Effectively manage the FCC’s processes for monitoring and
disposing of applications, petitions, and complaints before the FCC in order to achieve timely action on pending
items.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Continue efforts to ensure timely decision making and response to petitioners and applicants.
• Routinely collect and analyze data on items pending before the FCC to ensure effective
operations and resource allocation.

Outcome-oriented Performance Goal 8.6:
Continuously review and examine our regulatory processes and
significant regulations to achieve statutory objectives while reducing burdens on industry and promoting
innovation and job growth.

Targets with Subordinate Measures:


(1) Eliminate outdated regulations to ensure that FCC rules and policies promote a healthy climate for
private investment and job creation.
• Continue to conduct a review of rules and data collections within each FCC bureau and office
with the goal of eliminating or revising requirements that are outdated, inconsistent with current
technologies, or place needless burdens on businesses or FCC resources.
- 36 -




Means and Strategies for Accomplishing Performance

OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

Processes

Skills

Technology

 Management and document
 Planning, scheduling, and
 Commission Registration System
tracking and change control
budgeting
(CORES)
 Workforce analysis and
 Change management
 Core Financial Management
planning
 Productivity and efficiency
System
 Capital asset planning and
improvement
 Electronic Commission Lifecycle
deployment
 Training and workforce
Agenda Tracking System
 Strategic and performance
development
(eCLAS)
planning
 Workforce analysis
 Electronic Document
 Information technology
 Financial Accounting and
Management System (EDOCS)
planning and deployment
Auditing Analysis
 Electronic Comment Filing
 Performance budgeting
 Cyber security expertise
System (ECFS)
 Acquisition and procurement  Understanding of relevant law
 Consumer Complaints
strategy

Management System (CCMS)
 Enhanced secure
 Enforcement Bureau Automated
infrastructure and network
Tracking System (EBATS)
 Fee Filer
 Desktop/Network Document
Development and Data Access
Tools
 Enterprise Architecture &
Program Management
 Earned Value Management
(EVM) & Clarity









- 37 -















FEE COLLECTIONS AND AUCTIONS










FEE COLLECTIONS AND AUCTIONS


Regulatory Fees


P.L. 103-66, “The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993,” requires that the FCC annually
collect fees and retain them for FCC use in order to offset certain costs incurred by the
Commission.

The fees collected are intended to recover the costs attributable to the Commission’s enforcement,
policy and rulemaking, user information services, and international regulatory activities.

The fees, often referred to as Section 9 fees, apply to the current holder of the license as of a
specific date and to other entities (e.g., cable television systems) which benefit from Commission
regulatory activities not directly associated with its licensing or applications processing functions.

The regulatory fees do not apply to governmental entities, amateur radio operator licensees,
nonprofit entities holding tax exempt status under section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue code, 26
U.S.C. § 501, and certain other non-commercial entities.

The provisions of this law, codified at 47 U.S.C. § 159, give the Commission authority to review
the regulatory fees and to adjust the fees to reflect changes in its appropriation from year to year. It
may also add, delete or reclassify services under certain circumstances. Additionally, the
legislation requires the Commission to charge a 25% late payment penalty and to dismiss
applications or revoke licenses for non-payment of the fees, although it may waive, reduce, or
defer payment of a fee for good cause.

The Commission implemented the Regulatory Fee Collection Program by rulemaking on July 18,
1994. The most recent fee schedule became effective on September 4, 2012, pursuant to an order
adopted by the Commission on July 13, 2012, released July 19, 2012, and published in the Federal
Register August 3, 2012 (77 FR 46307).

Authorization to Retain Fees


Fees collected up to the level established by Congress are applied against the Commission’s
annual appropriation at the close of each fiscal year. The regulatory fee levels of $335.8 million
for FY 2011 and $339.8 million for FY 2012 were achieved. The Commission collected $6.3
million above the required regulatory level in FY 2011, which are reported as temporarily not
available pursuant to Public Law. The total cumulative amount collected above the required
regulatory level was $4.9 million at September 30, 2012.

Appropriations language for FY 2012 prohibits the Commission from using any excess offsetting
collections received in FY 2012 or any prior years. The FCC proposed the same treatment of
excess collections in its FY 2013 and FY 2014 budget request.


- 38 -







FY 2014 Regulatory Fee Assumptions


The FY 2012 appropriation for the FCC authorized $339.8 million in collection of regulatory fees.
The FY 2013 Congressional budget request increased regulatory fees to a level of $346.8
million. The FY 2014 budget proposes an increase of regulatory fees to a level of $359.3
million. These funds will support Commission-wide goals that will allow the FCC to serve the
American public in an efficient, effective, and responsive manner. The distribution of Budget
Authority between direct and offsetting collections from Regulatory Fees is illustrated in the
above graph.
- 39 -



Application Processing Fees


Since FY 1987, the FCC has collected and deposited into the General Fund of the U.S. Treasury
application processing fees, often referred to as Section 8 fees. The fees are intended to recover a
substantial portion of the costs of the Commission’s applications processing functions. The
program encompasses over 300 different fees, with the vast majority collected at the time an
original license application, renewal, or request for modification is filed with the Commission.
Most fees are assessed as a one-time charge on a per-application basis, although there are certain
exceptions. Government, nonprofit, non-commercial broadcast, and amateur license applicants are
exempt from the fees. A lockbox bank is used to collect the fees, with all fees deposited into the
General Fund of the U.S. Treasury. Once deposited, these fees are generally not refundable
regardless of the outcome of the application process. The Commission must review and revise the
fees every two years based upon changes to the Consumer Price Index (CPI). On February 28,
2011, the Commission adopted an Order which increased application fees to reflect these CPI
changes; this change became effective June 21, 2011. Application Processing Fee Collections
(Section 8) and Regulatory Fee collections are summarized in the following graph.








- 40 -



Spectrum Auctions


The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, P.L. 103-66, required the FCC to auction
portions of the spectrum for certain services, replacing the former lottery process. The
Commission is required to ensure that small businesses, women, minorities, and rural telephone
companies have an opportunity to participate in the competitive bidding process. The Commission
initiated regulations implementing the spectrum auction authority granted by the legislation and
conducted its first round of auctions in July 1994. To date the Commission has completed 81
auctions. As of December 31, 2012, total net winning bids collected and deposited into Treasury
from this program have exceeded $51.9 billion. The original spectrum auction authority was
scheduled to expire in FY 1998. However, it was extended through FY 2007 in the Balanced
Budget Act of 1997, P.L. 105-33; FY 2011 by the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, P.L. 109-171;
2012 by the DTV Delay Act, P.L. 111-4; and most recently, the authority was extended through
September 30, 2022, by the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012, P.L. 112-96.

The Commission is authorized to retain from auction revenues those funds necessary to develop,
implement, and maintain the auction program. These funds cover the personnel and
administrative costs required to plan and execute spectrum auctions; operational costs to manage
installment payments and collections activities; development, implementation, and maintenance
of all information technology systems necessary for Auctions operations, including development
of a combinatorial bidding system; and a proportional share of the general administrative costs of
the Commission based on the split of direct FTE hours charged to auctions in the previous year.
This budget submission assumes the auctions program will continue to recover the costs of
conducting all auctions activities from spectrum license auction receipts as the FCC continues to
use auctions as a licensing mechanism for spectrum based communications services. The FCC’s
FY 2012 Appropriations language capped the auctions program at $85 million. The FCC‘s
request during the Continuing Resolution (CR) for an anomaly in FY 2013 to fund the Auctions
program was approved at $98.7 million. We have requested $89.4 million for the auctions
program in FY 2014.

The Balanced Budget Act of 1997, P.L. 105-33, required that the Commission provide to
authorizing committees a detailed report of obligations in support of the auctions program for each
fiscal year of operation, as a prerequisite to the continued use of auctions receipts for the costs of
all auctions activities. The FY 2012 Auctions Report will be provided to the appropriate
Congressional committees by September, 2013. The FY 2013 Auctions Report will be submitted
by September, 2014.



- 41 -



FY 1994 - FY 2013 Auctions and Collections

Number of

Number of

FY

Auctions

Licences Won

Amount Collected

1994
2
604
$652,954,213
1995
2
129
$8,234,321,195
1996
6
2,026
$2,019,328,594
1997
4
1,614
$2,205,922,232
1998
2
1,388
$860,878,576
1999
6
1,693
$499,598,445
2000
8
4,403
$1,335,043,186
2001
4
3,447
$583,599,901
2002
7
7,036
$135,450,240
2003
7
3,144
$77,121,620
2004
5
267
$126,790,232
2005
6
2,803
$2,208,332,556
2006
5
1,284
$13,834,972,696
2007
5
293
$163,429,971
2008
3
1,144
$18,985,204,841
2009
2
115
$5,578,176
2010
3
4,788
$25,923,987
2011
3
126
$30,966,316
2012
1
93
$3,829,068
81
36,397
$51,989,246,043



- 42 -


















BUREAUS AND OFFICES

FY 2014 REQUIREMENTS









BUREAU/OFFICE FY 2014 REQUIREMENTS



BUREAUS


Office of Chairman and Commissioners ..................................................................................... 43
Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau ............................................................................. 44
Enforcement Bureau .................................................................................................................... 46
International Bureau .................................................................................................................... 48
Media Bureau ............................................................................................................................... 50
Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau ............................................................................. 51
Wireless Telecommunications Bureau ........................................................................................ 54
Wireline Competition Bureau ...................................................................................................... 55

AGENCY OFFICES:

Office of Administrative Law Judges ......................................................................................... 56
Office of Communications Business Opportunities ................................................................... 58
Office of Engineering and Technology ...................................................................................... 60
Office of General Counsel .......................................................................................................... 62
Office of Inspector General ........................................................................................................ 64
Office of Legislative Affairs ....................................................................................................... 66
Office of the Managing Director ................................................................................................ 67
Office of Media Relations .......................................................................................................... 68
Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis ...................................................................... 69
Office of Workplace Diversity ................................................................................................... 70
- 43 -



OFFICE OF THE CHAIRMAN AND COMMISSIONERS


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

25
31
31
11-Compensation
$3,023,807
$3,960,555
$3,995,247
12-Benefits
$755,463
$950,991
$959,321
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$3,779,270
$4,911,546
$4,954,568
21-Travel
$215,326
$279,950
$229,560
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$282,897
$313,203
$319,467
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$469
$4,000
$4,000
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$498,692
$597,153
$553,027

TOTAL

$4,277,962
$5,508,699
$5,507,595


The FCC is directed by five Commissioners appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate
for 5-year terms, except when filling an unexpired term. The President designates one of the
Commissioners to serve as Chairperson. Only three Commissioners may be members of the same
political party. None of them can have a financial interest in any Commission-related business.

The Chairman serves as the chief executive officer of the Commission, supervising all FCC activities,
delegating responsibilities to staff units and Bureaus, and formally representing the Commission before
the Congress and the Administration.
- 44 -



CONSUMER AND GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS BUREAU



2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

172
167
167
11-Compensation
$18,087,343
$18,011,555
$18,169,325
12-Benefits
$4,691,097
$4,525,673
$4,565,315
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$22,778,440
$22,537,228
$22,734,640
21-Travel
$222,251
$211,222
$173,202
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$1,116,675
$1,148,087
$1,171,049
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$1,662,661
$1,209,369
$2,733,556
26-Supplies and Materials
$19,544
$671
$684
31-Equipment
$27,718
$2,175
$2,219
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$3,048,849
$2,571,524
$4,080,710

TOTAL

$25,827,289
$25,108,752
$26,815,350


The Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau develops and administers the Commission’s
consumer and inter-governmental affairs policies and initiatives to enhance the public’s understanding
of the Commission’s work and to facilitate the Agency’s relationships with other governmental
agencies and organizations. The Bureau is responsible for rulemaking proceedings regarding general
consumer and disability policy. The Bureau serves as the primary entity responsible for
communicating with the general public regarding Commission policies, programs, and activities in
order to facilitate public education and participation in the Commission’s decision-making processes.

The Bureau’s overall objectives include: advising the Commissioners and the other Bureaus and
Offices on consumer, disability, and inter-governmental related areas of concern or interest; initiating,
reviewing, and coordinating orders, programs, and actions, in conjunction with other Bureaus and
Offices, in matters regarding consumer and disability policy and procedures, and any other related
issues affecting consumer policy; representing the Commission on consumer and inter-governmental
related committees, working groups, task forces, and conferences within and outside the Agency; and
providing expert advice and assistance to Bureaus and Offices and consumers regarding compliance
with applicable disability and accessibility requirements, rules, and regulations.

The Bureau serves as the public face of the Commission through outreach and education, as well as
through our Consumer Center, which is responsible for responding to consumer inquiries and
complaints. The Bureau also maintains collaborative partnerships with state, local, and tribal
governments in such critical areas as emergency preparedness and implementation of new
technologies.

The Bureau’s activities include: consumer and disability policy development and coordination;
interaction with the public, federal, state, local, tribal, and other government agencies and industry
groups; oversight of the Consumer Advisory Committee, and the Intergovernmental Advisory
Committee; informal complaint mediation and resolution; consumer outreach and education;
- 45 -



maintaining official FCC records; coordination with the Office of Managing Director for Agency-wide
strategic planning efforts; and any other functions as may be assigned, delegated, or referred to the
Bureau by the Commission.
- 46 -




ENFORCEMENT BUREAU


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

267
265
265
11-Compensation
$30,869,156
$30,931,153
$31,202,091
12-Benefits
$8,149,975
$8,225,137
$8,297,184
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$39,019,131
$39,156,290
$39,499,275
21-Travel
$279,824
$325,619
$269,037
22-Transportation of Things
$5,690
$13,344
$13,611
23-Rent and Communications
$3,340,055
$3,448,687
$3,517,661
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$659,453
$605,676
$617,790
26-Supplies and Materials
$310,179
$262,945
$268,204
31-Equipment
$931,517
$4,525,021
$2,065,521
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$5,526,718
$9,181,292
$6,751,824

TOTAL

$44,545,849
$48,337,582
$46,251,098


The Enforcement Bureau serves as the primary Commission entity responsible for enforcement of the
Communications Act and other communications statutes, the Commission’s rules, orders, and
authorizations, other than matters that are addressed in the context of a pending application for a
license or other authorization or in the context of administration, including post-grant administration,
of a licensing or other authorization or registration program. The Enforcement Bureau’s
responsibilities include, among other things:

 Resolving complaints regarding:
o compliance with statutory and regulatory provisions, including complaints filed
under section 208 of the Communications Act;
o acts or omissions of non-common carriers subject to the Commission’s jurisdiction
under Title II of the Communications Act and related provisions;
o accessibility to communications services and equipment for persons with
disabilities;
o radiofrequency interference and radiofrequency equipment and devices;
o compliance with the Commission’s Emergency Alert System rules;
o the lighting and marking of radio transmitting towers;
o indecent communications subject to the Commission’s jurisdiction;
o the broadcast and cable television children’s television programming commercial
limits contained in section 102 of the Children’s Television Act;
o unauthorized construction and operation of communications facilities;
o false distress signals;
- 47 -



o Title III licensees and permittees;
o pole attachments filed under section 224 of the Communications Act;
o multichannel video and cable television service under part 76 of the Commission’s
rules; and
o other matters assigned to it by the Commission.
 Resolving universal service suspension and debarment proceedings.
 Conducting investigations and collecting information in connection with complaints, on its own
initiative, or upon request of another Bureau or Office.
 Mediating and settling disputes between service providers.
 Serving as trial staff in formal hearings conducted pursuant to 5 U.S.C. § 556 regarding
applications, revocation, forfeitures, and other matters designated for hearing.
 Providing field support for, and field representation of, the Bureau, other Bureaus and Offices,
and the Commission.
 Handling congressional and other correspondence relating to or requesting specific
enforcement actions, specific complaints, or other specific matters within the responsibility of
the Bureau, to the extent not otherwise handled by the Consumer and Governmental Affairs
Bureau, the Office of General Counsel (impermissible ex parte presentations), or another
Bureau or Office.
 Issuing non-hearing related subpoenas for the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the
production of books, papers, correspondence, memoranda, schedules of charges, contracts,
agreements, and any other records deemed relevant to the investigation of matters within the
responsibility of the Bureau.

- 48 -




INTERNATIONAL BUREAU


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

121
120
120
11-Compensation
$15,855,843
$15,815,608
$15,954,143
12-Benefits
$3,996,682
$3,979,870
$4,014,731
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$19,852,525
$19,795,478
$19,968,874
21-Travel
$645,827
$373,412
$336,197
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$1,000,844
$1,023,732
$1,044,207
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$37,138
$57,424
$58,572
26-Supplies and Materials
$12,860
$18,363
$18,730
31-Equipment
$300
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$1,696,969
$1,472,931
$1,457,707

TOTAL

$21,549,494
$21,268,409
$21,426,581


The International Bureau develops, recommends, and administers policies, standards, procedures, and
programs for the regulation of international telecommunications facilities and services, and the
licensing of satellite and submarine cable facilities under its jurisdiction. The Bureau advises and
recommends to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in the
development of and administration of international telecommunications policies and programs. The
International Bureau assumes the principal representational role for Commission activities in
international organizations. The International Bureau has the following duties and responsibilities:

 Initiating and directing the development and articulation of international telecommunications
policies, consistent with the priorities of the Commission.
 Advising the Chairman and Commissioners on matters of international telecommunications
policy, and on the status of the Commission's actions to promote the vital interests of the
American public in international commerce, national defense, and foreign policy areas.
 Developing, recommending, and administering policies, rules, and procedures for the
authorization, licensing, and regulation of international telecommunications facilities and
services, and domestic and international satellite systems.
 Representing the Commission on international telecommunications matters at both domestic
and international conferences and meetings, and directing and coordinating the Commission’s
preparation for such conferences and meetings.
 Serving as the single focal point within the Commission for cooperation and consultation on
international telecommunications matters with other federal agencies, international or foreign
organizations, and appropriate regulatory bodies and officials of foreign government.
 Directing and coordinating, in consultation with appropriate bureaus and offices, negotiation of
international agreements to provide for arrangements and procedures for bilateral coordination
- 49 -



of radio frequency assignments to prevent or resolve international radio interference involving
U.S. licensees.
 Developing, coordinating with other federal agencies, and administering regulatory assistance
and training programs for foreign administrations to promote telecommunications development.
 Providing advice and technical assistance to U.S. trade officials in the negotiation and
implementation of telecommunications trade agreements.
 Conducting economic, legal, technical, statistical, and other appropriate studies, surveys, and
analyses in support of development of international telecommunications policies and programs.
 Collecting and disseminating within the Commission information and data on international
telecommunications, and regulatory and market developments in other countries and
international organizations.
 Promoting the international coordination of spectrum allocation, and frequency and orbital
assignments, so as to minimize cases of international radio interference involving U.S.
licensees.
 Ensuring fulfillment of the Commission’s responsibilities under international agreements and
treaty obligations, and, consistent with Commission policy, ensuring that the Commission’s
regulations, procedures, and frequency allocations comply with mandatory requirements of all
applicable international and bilateral agreements.
 Overseeing and, as appropriate, administering activities pertaining to the international
consultation, coordination, and notification of U.S. frequency and orbital assignments,
including activities required by bilateral agreements, the International Radio Regulations, and
other international agreements.
 Monitoring compliance with the terms and conditions of authorizations and licenses granted by
the Bureau, and pursuing enforcement actions in conjunction with appropriate bureaus and
offices.
- 50 -



MEDIA BUREAU


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

183
180
180
11-Compensation
$21,047,283
$20,830,226
$21,012,686
12-Benefits
$5,281,040
$5,208,772
$5,254,398
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$26,328,323
$26,038,998
$26,267,083
21-Travel
$37,605
$28,684
$23,521
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$1,525,660
$1,560,551
$1,591,762
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$55,590
$652,153
$155,196
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$249
$13,454
$13,723
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$1,619,104
$2,254,842
$1,784,202

TOTAL

$27,947,427
$28,293,840
$28,051,285


The Media Bureau develops, recommends, and administers the policy and licensing programs for the
regulation of media, including cable television, broadcast television and radio, and satellite services in
the United States and its territories. The Bureau advises and recommends to the Commission, or acts
for the Commission under delegated authority, in matters pertaining to multichannel video
programming distribution, broadcast radio and television, direct broadcast satellite service policy, and
associated matters. The Bureau will, among other things:
 Conduct rulemaking proceedings concerning the legal, engineering, and economic aspects of
electronic media services.
 Conduct comprehensive studies and analyses concerning the legal, engineering, and economic
aspects of electronic media services.
 Resolve waiver petitions, declaratory rulings, and adjudications related to electronic media
services.
 Process applications for authorization, assignment, transfer, and renewal of media services,
including AM, FM, TV, the cable TV relay service, and related matters.

- 51 -



PUBLIC SAFETY AND HOMELAND SECURITY BUREAU


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

111
112
112
11-Compensation
$13,157,624
$13,392,969
$13,510,283
12-Benefits
$3,552,444
$3,593,291
$3,624,766
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$16,710,068
$16,986,260
$17,135,049
21-Travel
$138,827
$93,764
$76,886
22-Transportation of Things
$35,460
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$843,343
$862,248
$879,493
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$188,195
$1,125,043
$127,544
26-Supplies and Materials
$12,620
$10,810
$11,026
31-Equipment
$68,466
$31,358
$31,985
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$1,286,911
$2,123,223
$1,126,934

TOTAL

$17,996,979
$19,109,483
$18,261,982


The Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (PSHS) advises and makes recommendations to the
Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in all matters pertaining to public
safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster
management, and ancillary operations. The Bureau has responsibility for coordinating public safety,
homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management,
and related activities within the Commission. The Bureau also performs the following functions:

 Develops, recommends, and administers policy goals, objectives, rules, regulations, programs,
and plans for the Commission to promote effective and reliable communications for public
safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster
management and related activities, including public safety communications (including 911,
enhanced 911, and other emergency number issues), priority emergency communications, alert
and warning systems (including the Emergency Alert System), continuity of government
operations, implementation of Homeland Security Presidential Directives and Orders, disaster
management coordination and outreach, communications infrastructure protection, reliability,
operability and interoperability of networks and communications systems, the Communications
Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), and network security. Recommends policies
and procedures for public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management
and preparedness, and recommends national emergency plans and preparedness programs
covering Commission functions during national emergency conditions. Conducts outreach and
coordination activities with, among others, state and local governmental agencies, hospitals and
other emergency health care providers, and public safety organizations. Recommends national
emergency plans, policies, and preparedness programs covering the provision of service by
communications service providers, including telecommunications service providers,
information service providers, common carriers, non-common carriers, broadcasting and cable
facilities, satellite and wireless radio services, radio frequency assignment, electro-magnetic
radiation, investigation, and enforcement.
- 52 -




 Under the general direction of the Defense Commissioner, coordinates the public safety,
homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster
management, and related activities of the Commission, including national security and
emergency preparedness and defense mobilization, Continuity of Government (COG) planning,
alert and warning systems (including the Emergency Alert System), and other functions as may
be delegated during a national emergency or activation of the President’s war emergency
powers as specified in section 706 of the Communications Act. Provides support to the
Defense Commissioner, including with respect to his/her participation in public safety and
homeland security organizations and committees. Represents the Defense Commissioner with
other Government agencies and organizations, the communications industry, and Commission
licensees on public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and
preparedness, disaster management, and related issues.

 Develops and administers rules, regulations, and policies for priority emergency
communications, including the Telecommunications Service Priority System. Supports the
Chief of the Wireline Competition, International, and Wireless Telecommunications Bureaus
on matters involving assignment of Telecommunications Service Priority System priorities and
in administration of that system.

 The Chief of PSHS Bureau or designee acts as the FCC Alternate Homeland Security and
Defense Coordinator and principal to the successor to the National Communications System,
and serves as the Commission’s representative on the successor’s committees.

 Advises and makes recommendations to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under
delegated authority, in all matters pertaining to the licensing and regulation of public safety,
homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, and disaster
management wireless telecommunications, including ancillary operations related to the
provision or use of such services.

 Conducts studies of public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency
management and preparedness, disaster management, and related issues. Develops and
administers recordkeeping and reporting requirements for communications companies
pertaining to these issues. Administers any Commission information collection requirements
pertaining to public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and
preparedness, disaster management, and related issues.

 Interacts with the public, local, state and other governmental agencies, and industry groups
(including advisory committees and public safety organizations and associations) on public
safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management, disaster management,
and related issues. Serves as the point of contact for the U.S. Government in matters of
international monitoring, fixed and mobile direction-finding, and interference resolution, and
oversees coordination of non-routine communications and materials between the Commission
and international or regional public organizations or foreign administrations.

 Maintains and operates the Commission’s public safety, homeland security, national security,
emergency management and preparedness, and disaster management facilities and operations,
including the Communications Center, the establishment of any Emergency Operations Center
(EOC), and any liaison activities with other federal, state, or local government organizations.
- 53 -




 Reviews and coordinates orders, programs, and actions initiated by other Bureaus and Offices
in matters affecting public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency
management and preparedness, disaster management, and related issues to ensure consistency
with overall Commission policy.

 Develops and recommends responses to legislative, regulatory, or judicial inquiries and
proposals concerning or affecting public safety, homeland security, national security,
emergency management, disaster management, and related issues. Responses to judicial
inquiries should be developed with and recommended to the Office of General Counsel.

 Develops and maintains the Commission’s plans and procedures, including the oversight,
preparation, and training of Commission personnel, for Continuity of Operations (COOP),
Continuity of Government functions, and Commission activities and responses to national
emergencies and other similar situations.

 Acts on emergency requests for Special Temporary Authority during non-business hours when
the other Offices and Bureaus of the Commission are closed. Such actions shall be coordinated
with, if possible, and promptly reported to the responsible Bureau or Office.

 Maintains liaison with other Bureaus and Offices concerning matters affecting public safety,
homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster
management, and related issues.

 Is authorized to declare that a temporary state of communications emergency exists pursuant to
§ 97.401(b) of this chapter and to act on behalf of the Commission with respect to the operation
of amateur stations during such temporary state of communications emergency.

 Performs such other functions and duties as may be assigned or referred to it by the
Commission or the Defense Commissioner.



- 54 -




WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS BUREAU


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

218
220
220
11-Compensation
$12,446,359
$12,825,265
$12,937,606
12-Benefits
$3,242,439
$3,479,755
$3,510,235
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$15,688,798
$16,305,020
$16,447,842
21-Travel
$13,443
$17,592
$14,426
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$270,340
$276,523
$282,053
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$353,515
$55,010
$56,110
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$637,298
$349,125
$352,590

TOTAL

$16,326,096
$16,654,145
$16,800,431


The Wireless Telecommunications Bureau (WTB) advises and makes recommendations to the
Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in matters pertaining to the
regulation and licensing of wireless communications services, devices, facilities, and electromagnetic
spectrum resources. The Bureau develops and recommends policy goals, objectives, programs, and
plans for the Commission on matters concerning wireless communications and electromagnetic
spectrum resources, drawing upon relevant economic, technological, legislative, regulatory, and
judicial information and developments. Such matters include addressing the present and future
wireless communications and spectrum needs of U.S. consumers, businesses, state, local, and tribal
governments, and other entities; promoting access, efficiency, and innovation in the allocation,
licensing and use of the electromagnetic spectrum; ensuring choice, opportunity, and fairness in the
development of wireless communication services and markets; developing policies regarding the
conduct of auctions of Commission licenses; promoting investment in wireless communications
infrastructure, including wireless broadband, and the integration and interconnection of wireless
communications networks with other communications networks and facilities; and promoting the
development and widespread availability of wireless broadband, mobile, public safety, and other
wireless communications services, devices, and facilities, including through open networks, where
appropriate.

The Bureau’s activities include developing and coordinating policy; conducting rulemaking and
licensing work; conducting spectrum auctions of wireless licenses; conducting auctions for other
services and programs as needed; and acting on applications for service and facility authorizations.
The Bureau also determines the resource impact of existing, planned, or recommended Commission
activities concerning wireless communications, and develops and recommends resources deployment
priorities. The Bureau reviews and coordinates orders, programs, and actions initiated by other
Bureaus and Offices in matters affecting wireless communications to ensure consistency of overall
Commission policy.
- 55 -





WIRELINE COMPETITION BUREAU


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

160
176
217
11-Compensation
$20,816,652
$23,065,864
$28,767,907
12-Benefits
$5,506,354
$6,078,584
$7,631,829
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$26,323,006
$29,144,448
$36,399,735
21-Travel
$42,846
$58,463
$52,034
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$1,332,235
$1,362,702
$1,389,956
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$151,588
$90,747
$92,562
26-Supplies and Materials
$2,023
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$6,148
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$1,534,840
$1,511,912
$1,534,552

TOTAL

$27,857,846
$30,656,360
$37,934,287


The Wireline Competition Bureau advises and makes recommendations to the Commission, or acts for
the Commission under delegated authority, on matters concerning wireline communications and
ancillary operations, drawing on relevant economic, technological, legislative, regulatory, and judicial
information and developments. The Bureau’s objectives include: ensuring that all Americans are
included in 21st century communications by reaching all of America with affordable broadband and
voice services; ensuring access to affordable broadband connectivity for schools, libraries, and health
care institutions; fostering competition, especially for small businesses; ensuring a sustainable
framework for competitors who rely on the facilities of others; and ensuring that the public has access
to accurate and comprehensive data about communications services, including data about broadband.

The Bureau’s activities include: policy development and coordination; adjudicatory and rulemaking
proceedings affecting wireline telecommunications service providers; administering the provisions of
the Communications Act relating to charges, practices, and classifications for wireline
telecommunications service providers to ensure that they are just and reasonable; action on requests for
interpretation or waivers of rules; determinations regarding lawfulness of carrier tariffs; action on
applications for authorization to transfer service and facility authorizations or to discontinue services
or the operation of facilities; review of carrier performance; administration of accounting requirements
for incumbent local exchange carriers; administration of FCC reporting requirements affecting
telecommunications and broadband providers; economic research and analysis; interaction with the
public, local, state, and other government agencies, industry groups, and other stakeholders on wireline
communications regulation and related matters; reviewing and coordinating orders, programs, and
actions initiated by other Bureaus and Offices in matters affecting wireline communications to ensure
consistency with overall Commission policy; and any other functions as may be assigned, delegated, or
referred to the Bureau by the Commission.

- 56 -



AGENCY OFFICES


Office of Administrative Law Judges


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

3
4
4
11-Compensation
$306,738
$429,748
$433,512
12-Benefits
$52,392
$71,733
$72,361
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$359,130
$501,481
$505,874
21-Travel
$497
$522
$428
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$22,123
$22,627
$23,080
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$4,000
$20,375
$20,783
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$26,620
$43,524
$44,290

TOTAL

$385,750
$545,005
$550,164


The Office of Administrative Law Judges hears and conducts all adjudicatory cases designated for
formal evidentiary hearing, other than those designated to be heard by the Commission en banc or by
one or more members of the Commission, and other hearings as the Commission may assign. The
Office has the following responsibilities:

• Presiding over and conducting formal hearings involving investigations rule-making and
adjudication.

• Acting on motions, petitions, and other pleadings filed in proceedings, and conducting pre-
hearing conferences.

• Administering the oath, examining witnesses, ruling upon evidentiary questions, issuing
subpoenas, disposing of procedural motions, preparing and issuing Initial Decisions.
Performing substantially the same functions of U.S. District Court judges in non-jury cases,
with the exception that Initial Decisions rendered are subject to review by the Commission if
requested by a party or on the Commission’s own motion.

• Upon instruction of the Chairman, serving as liaison for the Commission and this Office in
making appropriate arrangements for securing advice or information from representatives of
other agencies, bar associations, and interested persons in connection with hearing procedures.

• Preparing and maintaining hearing calendars, showing time and place of hearings.

- 57 -



• Preparing reports, statistical data, and other information requested or required by the Office of
Personnel Management, and other offices or agencies of the U.S. Government concerned with
proper operation of the Office of Administrative Law Judges.

• Exercising such authority as may be assigned by the Commission pursuant to section 5(c) of
the Communications Act of 1934, as amended.




- 58 -



Office of Communications Business Opportunities


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

12
12
12
11-Compensation
$1,413,436
$1,500,906
$1,514,053
12-Benefits
$365,485
$394,596
$398,052
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$1,778,921
$1,895,502
$1,912,105
21-Travel
$29,259
$34,380
$28,192
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$71,886
$73,510
$74,980
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$494,902
$0
$0
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$596,047
$107,890
$103,172

TOTAL

$2,374,968
$2,003,392
$2,015,277


The Office of Communications Business Opportunities (OCBO), as a staff office to the Commission,
develops, coordinates, evaluates, and recommends to the Commission policies, programs, and practices
that promote participation by small entities, women, and minorities in the communications industry. A
principal function of the Office is to lead, advise, and assist the Commission, including all of its
component Bureau/Office managers, supervisors, and staff, at all levels, on ways to ensure that the
competitive concerns of small entities, women, and minorities are fully considered by the agency in
notice and comment rulemakings. In accordance with this function, the Office:

 Conducts independent analyses of the Commission’s policies and practices to ensure that
those policies and practices fully consider the interests of small entities, women, and
minorities;
 Advises the Commission, Bureaus, and Offices of their responsibilities under the
Congressional Review Act provisions regarding small businesses; the Report to Congress
regarding Market Entry Barriers for Small Telecommunications Businesses (47 U.S.C. §
257); and the Telecommunications Development Fund (47 U.S.C. § 614).
The Office has the following duties and responsibilities:
 Serving, through its director, as the principal small business policy advisor to the
Commission;
 Developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies that promote participation
by small entities, women, and minorities in the communications industry;
 Managing the Regulatory Flexibility Analysis process pursuant to the Regulatory
Flexibility Act and the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act to ensure that
small business interests are fully considered in agency actions;
- 59 -



 Developing and recommending Commission-wide goals and objectives for addressing the
concerns of small entities, women, and minorities and reports of achievement;
 Acting as the principal channel for disseminating information regarding the Commission’s
activities and programs affecting small entities, women, and minorities;
 Developing, recommending, coordinating, and administering objectives, plans and
programs to encourage participation by small entities, women, and minorities in the
decision-making process;
 Promoting increased awareness within the Commission of the impact of policies on small
entities, women, and minorities;
 Acting as the Commission’s liaison to other federal agencies on matters relating to small
business.

- 60 -



Office of Engineering and Technology


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

80
85
85
11-Compensation
$9,628,406
$10,251,615
$10,341,413
12-Benefits
$2,540,859
$2,709,445
$2,733,178
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$12,169,265
$12,961,060
$13,074,591
21-Travel
$29,071
$25,208
$20,670
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$441,930
$452,036
$461,077
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$659,417
$195,527
$199,438
26-Supplies and Materials
$36,766
$41,404
$42,232
31-Equipment
$440,828
$592,900
$94,758
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$1,608,012
$1,307,075
$818,175

TOTAL

$13,777,277
$14,268,135
$13,892,765


The Office of Engineering and Technology allocates spectrum for commercial, private, and non-
Federal governmental use and provides expert advice on technical issues before the Commission,
including recommendations on technical standards for spectrum users. The Office also performs the
following duties and responsibilities:
 Developing overall policies, objectives, and priorities for the Office of Engineering and
Technology programs and activities; performing management functions; and supervising the
execution of these policies.
 Advising and representing the Commission on frequency allocation and spectrum usage
matters, including those covered by international agreements.
 Planning and directing broad programs for development of information relative to
communication techniques and equipment, radio wave propagation, and new uses for
communications, and advising the Commission and staff offices in such matters.
 Representing the Commission at various national and international conferences and meetings
devoted to the progress of communications and the development of information and standards.
 Conducting engineering and technical studies in advanced phases of terrestrial and space
communications, and special projects to obtain theoretical and experimental data on new or
improved techniques, including cooperative studies with other staff units and consultant and
contract efforts as appropriate.
 Advising the Commission and other Bureaus and Offices concerning spectrum management,
emerging technologies, technical standards, international considerations, and national security
matters involved in making or implementing policy or in resolving specific situations involving
these matters.
 Developing and implementing procedures to acquire, store, and retrieve scientific and technical
information required in the engineering work of the Commission.
- 61 -



 Providing advice to the Commission, participating in and coordinating staff work with respect
to general frequency allocation proceedings and other proceedings not within the jurisdiction of
any single Bureau, and providing assistance and advice with respect to rulemaking matters and
proceedings affecting more than one Bureau.
 Administering Parts 2, 5, 15, and 18, of the Commission’s Rules and Regulations.
 Performing technical, engineering, and management functions of the Commission with respect
to formulating rules and regulations, technical standards, and general policies for Parts 2, 5, 15
and 18, and for equipment authorization of radio equipment for compliance with all appropriate
rules.
 Maintaining liaison with other agencies of government, technical experts representing foreign
governments, and members of the public and industry concerned with communications and
frequency allocation and usage.
 Coordinating frequency assignments for Commission licensees with Federal Government
agencies, and representing the Commission on issues regarding use of spectrum when
jurisdiction is shared with the Federal Government.
 Preparing recommendations for legislation, and reviewing recommendations for rule changes
and rulemaking proposals initiated by other offices affecting Bureau programs and operations.

- 62 -



Office of General Counsel


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

70
73
73
11-Compensation
$9,659,720
$10,355,313
$10,446,019
12-Benefits
$2,508,545
$2,666,907
$2,690,267
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$12,168,265
$13,022,220
$13,136,287
21-Travel
$11,663
$13,008
$10,666
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$559,705
$572,505
$583,955
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$6,165
$3,353
$3,420
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$577,533
$588,866
$598,041

TOTAL

$12,745,798
$13,611,086
$13,734,328


As chief legal advisor to the Commission and its various components, the Office of General Counsel
performs the following duties and responsibilities:
 Prepares and makes recommendations and interpretations concerning procedural rules of
general applicability.
 Reviews all proposed Commission orders and rules for consistency with the Constitution, laws
of the United States, and other rules and precedents.
 Represents the Commission in litigation matters.
 Ensures consistent and timely public interest analysis of transactions considered by the
Commission and providing technical expertise on various corporate, bankruptcy, fraud, and
other transactional issues.
 Assists and makes recommendations to the Commission with respect to cases of adjudication
(including the review of initial decisions by Administrative Law Judges) and such other cases
as, by Commission policy, are handled in a similar manner and that have been designated for
hearing.
 Advises and makes recommendations to the Commission with respect to proposed legislation.
 Interprets statutes, regulations, and international agreements affecting the Commission.
 Provides advice to the Commission and its components on general law issues (e.g., leases,
contracts, debt collection, tort claims, fiscal law, and labor law) common to most federal
agencies.

- 63 -



 Serves as principal advisor to the Commission in the administration of laws and regulations
regarding government ethics, as well as the Freedom of Information, Privacy, Government in
the Sunshine, and Alternative Dispute Resolution Acts.
 Exercises such authority as may be assigned or referred to it by the Commission pursuant to
section 5(c) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, as well as the Commission’s
rules.


- 64 -



Office of Inspector General


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

40
46
46
11-Compensation
$3,419,851
$5,452,687
$5,500,160
12-Benefits
$889,669
$1,290,328
$1,301,630
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$4,309,520
$6,743,015
$6,801,791
21-Travel
$39,259
$95,197
$97,101
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$347,968
$350,709
$357,723
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$4,641,516
$1,552,562
$3,823,693
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$471
$480
31-Equipment
$116,542
$8,384
$8,552
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$5,145,285
$2,007,323
$4,287,549

TOTAL

$9,454,805
$8,750,338
$11,089,339


The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Office of Inspector General (OIG) was established
in compliance with the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law 94-454), as amended. The OIG
conducts and supervises audits, inspections, and investigations relating to FCC programs and
operations. The OIG provides management feedback and leadership, and recommends policies for
activities designed to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness in the administration of, and to
prevent and detect fraud and abuse in, such programs and operations. The OIG communicates with the
Commission and Congress to keep them informed about issues and deficiencies relating to the
administration of such programs and operations and the necessity for and progress of corrective action.
The Inspector General reports directly to the Commission. The primary duties and responsibilities of
the OIG include:

 Conducting, supervising, and coordinating audits and investigations relating to the programs
and operations of the FCC.

 Reviewing existing and proposed legislation and regulations relating to programs and
operations of the FCC, and making recommendations in semiannual reports required by section
5(a) of the Inspector General Act concerning the impact of such legislation or regulations on
the economy and efficiency in the administration of programs and operations administered or
financed by the FCC, and the prevention and detection of fraud and abuse in such programs and
operations.

 Recommending policies for, and conducting or coordinating other activities carried out by or
financed by the FCC for, the purpose of promoting economy and efficiency in the
administration of, or preventing and detecting fraud and abuse in, its programs and operations.

- 65 -



 Recommending policies for matters relating to the promotion of economy and efficiency in the
administration of, or the prevention and detection of fraud and abuse in, programs and
operations administered or financed by the FCC.

 Reporting expeditiously to the Attorney General whenever the Inspector General has
reasonable grounds to believe there has been a violation of Federal criminal law.















- 66 -



Office of Legislative Affairs


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

13
12
12
11-Compensation
$1,594,503
$1,583,862
$1,597,736
12-Benefits
$436,869
$427,654
$431,400
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$2,031,372
$2,011,516
$2,029,136
21-Travel
$5,234
$14,551
$4,932
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$69,816
$71,413
$72,841
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$0
$0
$0
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$75,050
$85,964
$77,773

TOTAL

$2,106,422
$2,097,480
$2,106,909


The Office of Legislative Affairs informs the Congress of the Commission’s decisions, facilitates
responses to Congressional inquiries, and provides technical assistance to Congressional staff
regarding proposed legislation. Specifically, the Office has the following functions:
 Advising and making recommendations to the Commission with respect to legislation proposed
by Members of Congress or other government agencies, and coordinating the preparation of
Commission views for submission to Congress or other government agencies.
 Tracking and monitoring legislation impacting the Commission, providing technical assistance
to Congressional staff, as necessary.
 Coordinating Commission and Bureau responses to formal inquiries by individual Members of
Congress and committees, including tracking inquiries and setting response times.
 Assisting the staffs of Members of Congress in responding to constituent concerns.
 Assisting in the preparation for, and the coordination of, the Chairman’s and Commissioners’
appearances before Committees of Congress.
 Assisting the Office of Managing Director in the preparation of the Managing Director’s annual
report to Congress, as well as with the annual submission of the Commission budget.
 Coordinating the Commission’s legislative program, obtaining Bureau and Office comments,
and drafting final legislative proposals.





- 67 -



Office of the Managing Director


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

203
219
223
11-Compensation
$19,605,863
$21,148,901
$21,314,396
12-Benefits
$4,550,684
$4,870,644
$4,915,073
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$15,050
$28,843
$29,420

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$24,171,597
$26,048,388
$26,258,888
21-Travel
$163,063
$239,763
$145,489
22-Transportation of Things
$67,690
$112,211
$114,455
23-Rent and Communications
$32,594,339
$32,379,660
$32,427,253
24-Printing and Reproduction
$1,155,079
$1,012,178
$1,032,422
25-Other Contractual Services
$41,050,618
$38,111,283
$41,067,621
26-Supplies and Materials
$1,355,995
$1,446,568
$1,475,499
31-Equipment
$3,295,952
$2,852,033
$3,899,074
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$206,357
$200
$200

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$79,889,093
$76,153,896
$80,162,013

TOTAL

$104,060,690
$102,202,284
$106,420,901


The Managing Director is appointed by the Chairman with the approval of the Commission. Under the
supervision and direction of the Chairman, the Managing Director serves as the Commission’s chief
operating official with the following duties and responsibilities:
 Providing managerial leadership to, and exercising supervision and direction over, the
Commission’s Bureaus and Offices with respect to management and administrative matters but
no substantive regulatory matters such as regulatory policy and rulemaking, authorization of
service, administration of sanctions, and adjudication.
 Formulating and administering all management and administrative policies, programs, and
directives for the Commission consistent with authority delegated by the Commission and the
Chairman, and recommending to the Chairman and the Commission major changes in such
policies and programs.
 As the administrative head of the agency, assisting the Chairman in carrying out the
administrative and executive responsibilities delegated to the Chairman.
 Advising the Chairman and the Commission on management, administrative, and related
matters; reviewing and evaluating the programs and procedures of the Commission; initiating
action or making recommendations as may be necessary to administer the Communications Act
most effectively in the public interest. Assessing the management, administrative, and resource
implications of any proposed action or decision to be taken by the Commission or by a Bureau
or Office under delegated authority; recommending to the Chairman and the Commission
program priorities, resource and position allocations, management, and administrative policies.
 Directing agency efforts to improve management effectiveness, operational efficiency,
employee productivity, and service to the public. Administering Commission-wide
management improvement programs.

- 68 -



Office of Media Relations


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

16
16
16
11-Compensation
$1,724,587
$1,779,077
$1,794,661
12-Benefits
$469,989
$488,325
$492,602
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$2,194,576
$2,267,402
$2,287,263
21-Travel
$13,509
$1,395
$1,144
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$92,886
$94,959
$96,858
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$325,386
$104,951
$107,050
26-Supplies and Materials
$9,851
$15,596
$15,908
31-Equipment
$81,235
$16,749
$17,084
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$522,867
$233,650
$238,044

TOTAL

$2,717,443
$2,501,052
$2,525,307


The Office of Media Relations informs the news media of Commission decisions and serves as the
Commission’s main point of contact with the media. The Office of Media Relations has the following
duties and responsibilities:
 Enhancing public understanding of and compliance with the Commission’s regulatory
requirements.
 Acting as the principal channel for communicating information to the news media on
Commission policies, programs, and activities.
 Advising the Commission on information dissemination as it affects liaison with the media.
 Managing the FCC’s Internet site and oversee the agency’s Web standards and guidelines,
including accessibility.
 Managing the audio and visual support services for the Commission.
 Also, manages the FCC's social media sites including Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr and
others.

- 69 -




Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

26
33
33
11-Compensation
$2,976,380
$3,808,434
$3,841,794
12-Benefits
$785,736
$1,052,720
$1,061,941
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$3,762,116
$4,861,154
$4,903,735
21-Travel
$21,387
$23,440
$19,221
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$148,988
$152,396
$155,444
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$0
$0
$0
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$309
$315
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$170,375
$176,145
$174,980

TOTAL

$3,932,491
$5,037,299
$5,078,715


The Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis (OSP) works with Bureaus and other Offices,
including those of the Chairman and other Commissioners, to develop and implement communications
policies in all areas of Commission authority and responsibility. Specifically, the Office performs
functions including:

 Acting as home for the FCC’s Chief Economist and Chief Technologist.
 Hosting Visiting Scholars from academia and elsewhere that joins the FCC on a temporary
basis to contribute to the Commission’s mission.
 Coordinating the publication of the FCC White Paper series, a forum for staff to publish
research aside from formal Commission actions.
 Working on high-priority issues at the request of the Chairman, Commissioners, or
Bureau/Office Chiefs.
 Leading outreach efforts to relevant stakeholders, e.g., within academia, think tanks, the
business community, and the capital markets.
 Providing research and expertise on request to any member of the Commission as resources
allow.





- 70 -




Office of Workplace Diversity


2012
2013
2014

Actuals

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FTE

5
5
5
11-Compensation
$562,042
$586,750
$591,890
12-Benefits
$159,235
$170,984
$172,482
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$721,277
$757,734
$764,371
21-Travel
$0
$32
$0
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$40,567
$41,495
$42,325
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$40,761
$28,889
$29,467
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$509
$519
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$81,328
$70,925
$72,311

TOTAL

$802,605
$828,659
$836,682


The Office of Workplace Diversity, as a staff office to the Commission, develops, coordinates,
evaluates, and recommends to the Commission policies, programs, and practices that foster a diverse
workforce and promotes and ensures equal opportunity for all employees and candidates for
employment. A principal function of the Office is to lead, advise, and assist the Commission,
including all of its component Bureau/Office managers, supervisors, and staff at all levels, on ways to
promote inclusion and full participation of all employees in pursuit of the Commission’s mission. In
accordance with this principal function, the Office shall: (1) conduct independent analyses of the
Commission’s policies and practices to ensure that those policies and practices foster diversity in the
workforce and ensure equal opportunity for employees and applicants; and (2) advise the Commission,
Bureaus, and Offices of their responsibilities under: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as
Amended; Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended; Age Discrimination in
Employment Act of 1967, as amended; Executive Order 11478; and all other statutes, Executive
Orders, and regulatory provisions relating to workforce diversity, equal employment opportunity,
nondiscrimination, and civil rights. The Office has the following duties and responsibilities:
 Serving, through its Director, as the principal advisor to the Chairman and Commission
officials on all aspects of workforce diversity, organization, equal employment opportunity,
nondiscrimination, and civil rights.
 Providing leadership and guidance to create a work environment that values and encourages
diversity in the workforce.
 Developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies to foster a workforce whose
diversity reflects the diverse makeup of the Nation, enhances the mission of the Commission,
and demonstrates the value and effectiveness of a diverse workforce.
 Developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies that promote understanding
among members of the Commission's workforce of their differences and the value of those
- 71 -



differences, and provides a channel for communication among diverse members of the
workforce at all levels.
 Developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies to ensure that all members of
the Commission’s workforce and candidates for employment have equal access to opportunities
for employment, career growth, training, and development, and are protected from
discrimination and harassment.
 Developing and recommending Commission-wide workforce diversity goals and reporting on
achievements.
 Developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies to enable all Bureaus and
Offices to manage a diverse workforce effectively and in compliance with all equal
employment opportunity and civil rights requirements.
 Working closely with the Associate Managing Director - Human Resources Management to
ensure compliance with Federal and Commission recruitment and staffing requirements.
 Managing the Commission’s equal employment opportunity compliance program.
Responsibilities in this area include processing complaints alleging discrimination,
recommending to the Chairman final decisions on EEO complaints within the Commission, and
providing consulting services to employees and applicants on EEO matters.
 Developing and administering the Commission’s program of accessibility and accommodation
for disabled persons in accordance with applicable regulations.
 Representing the Commission at meetings with other public and private groups and
organizations on matters concerning workforce diversity and equal employment opportunity.
 Maintaining liaison with and soliciting views of organizations within and outside the
Commission on matters relating to equal opportunity and workforce diversity.
- 72 -














APPENDICES










FY 2014 Budget Estimates to Congress

Summary of Requested Resources

($ in Thousands)

DISTRIBUTION OF BUDGET AUTHORITY:

Change to

FY 2012

FY 2013

FY 2014

Appropriated

Actual

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

Budget Authority

FCC - Commission without Office of the Inspector
General:

Direct Appropriation

$0
$0
$0
$0

Authority to Spend Offsetting Collections:
Regulatory Fees

329,232
338,032
348,210
10,178
Appropriation Total
$329,232
$338,032
$348,210
$10,178

Authority to Spend
Other Off-setting Collections:
1) Economy Act/Misc. Other

$4,564
$6,000
$6,000
$0
2) Auctions Cost Recovery Reimbursements
83,900
97,447
88,694
(8,753)

Other Offsetting Collections

$88,464
$103,447
$94,694
($8,753)

Total Budget Authority - Available to incur obligations

$417,696
$441,479
$442,904
$1,425

Other Budget Authority

Credit Program Account 1/
$477
$3,621
$1,510
($2,111)

FCC - Office of the Inspector General:
Direct Appropriation

$0
$0
$0
$0

Authority to Spend Offsetting Collections:
Regulatory Fees

9,455
8,750
11,089
2,339
OIG Appropriation Total
$9,455
$8,750
$11,089
$2,339

Authority to Spend
Other Off-setting Collections:
1) Economy Act/Misc. Other

$0
0
0
$0
2) Auctions Cost Recovery Reimbursements
1,009
1,292
706
(586)

OIG Other Offsetting Collections

$1,009
$1,292
$706
($586)

OIG Total Budget Authority - Available to incur obligations

$10,464
$10,042
$11,795
$1,753

Other Budget Authority

Credit Program Account 1/
$301
$305
$423
$118
Universal Service Fund (USF) 2/
$11,391
$5,011
$4,259
($752)

Total FCC with OIG

Appropriation Total
$338,687
$346,782
$359,299
$12,517

Other Offsetting Collections

$89,473
$104,739
$95,400
($9,339)

Total Budget Authority - Available to incur obligations

$428,160
$451,521
$454,699
$3,178
1/ Credit Program Account carryover amount.
2/ The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008 (P.L. 110-161) authorizes use of $21.5M to be used by the Office of the Inspector General for USF Audit
Support. In FY 2008 - FY 2012, $12.2M was obligated. The remaining $9.3M has been carried forward, as follows: $5.0M is estimated to be used in FY 2013,
and $4.3M will be used for future fiscal years.

- 73 -



FY 2014 Budget Estimates to Congress

Summary of Requested Resources

($ in Thousands)

DISTRIBUTION OF OBLIGATIONS:

FY 2012

FY 2013

FY 2014

Actual

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

Difference

FCC - Commission without Office of the Inspector
General:

Direct Appropriation

$0
$0
$0
$0

Offsetting Collections - Obligations:
Regulatory Fees

$329,232
$338,032
$348,210
$10,178

Subtotal - Obligations from Appropriated Funds

$329,232
$338,032
$348,210
$10,178

Obligations - Other Offsetting Collections
1) Economy Act/Misc. Other

$4,564
$6,000
$6,000
$0
2) Auctions Cost Recovery Reimbursements
83,900
97,447
88,694
(8,753)

Subtotal Obligations Other Offsetting Collections

$88,464
$103,447
$94,694
($8,753)

TOTAL OBLIGATIONS & OUTLAYS

$417,696
$441,479
$442,904
$1,425

Other Budget Authority:

Credit Program Account

$477
$3,621
$1,510
($2,112)

FCC - Office of the Inspector General:

Direct Appropriation

$0
$0
$0
$0

Offsetting Collections - Obligations:
Regulatory Fees

$9,455
$8,750
$11,089
$2,339

OIG Subtotal - Obligations from Appropriated Funds

$9,455
$8,750
$11,089
$2,339

Obligations - Other Offsetting Collections
1) Economy Act/Misc. Other

$0
$0
$0
$0
2) Auctions Cost Recovery Reimbursements
1,009
1,292
706
(586)

OIG Subtotal Obligations Other Offsetting Collections

$1,009
$1,292
$706
($586)

OIG TOTAL OBLIGATIONS & OUTLAYS

$10,464
$10,042
$11,795
$1,753

Other Budget Authority:

Credit Program Account

$301
$305
$423
$118

Universal Service Fund (USF) 1/

$2,119
$5,011
$4,259
($752)

Total FCC with OIG

Subtotal - Obligations from Appropriated Funds

$338,687
$346,782
$359,299
$12,517

Subtotal Obligations Other Offsetting Collections

$89,473
$104,739
$95,400
($9,339)

TOTAL OBLIGATIONS & OUTLAY

$428,160
$451,521
$454,699
$3,178
1/ The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008 (P.L. 110-161) authorizes use of $21.5M to be used by the Office of the Inspector General for USF Audit
Support. In FY 2008 - FY 2012, $12.2M was obligated. The remaining $9.3M has been carried forward, as follows: $5.0M is estimated to be used in FY 2013,
and $4.3M will be used for future fiscal years.
- 74 -




FY 2014 Budget Estimates to Congress

Summary of Requested Resources

($ in Millions)

OUTLAYS:

FY 2012

FY 2013

FY 2014

Actual

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FCC - Commission without Office of the Inspector
General:

New Offsetting Collections:

Regulatory Fees

$327
$336
$346

Auctions Receipts

84
98
88

Interagency/Other

5
6
6

Homeland Security

2
2
2

Subtotal, Outlays from new discretionary authority

$418
$442
$442

Outlays from prior year discretionary balances

0
0
0

SUBTOTAL OUTLAYS

$418
$442
$442

FCC - Office of the Inspector General:
New Offsetting Collections:

Regulatory Fees

$10
$9
$11

Auctions Receipts

1
1
1

Interagency/Other

0
0
0

Homeland Security

0
0
0

Subtotal, Outlays from new discretionary authority

$11
$10
$12

Outlays from prior year discretionary balances

0
0
0

OIG SUBTOTAL OUTLAYS

$11
$10
$12

TOTAL FCC with OIG OUTLAYS

$429
$452
$454
- 75 -




FY 2014 Budget Estimates to Congress

Summary of Requested Resources

($ in Millions)

FY 2012

FY 2013

FY 2014

Actual

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

FCC - Commission without Office of the Inspector
General:

Total Compensable Workyears:
Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTEs)

1,685
1,730
1,775

Proposed Distribution:
Direct

0
0
0
Offsetting Collections 1/
1,682
1,725
1,770
Auctions Credit Program Account
3
5
5

TOTAL FTE - Commission

1,685
1,730
1,775

FCC - Office of the Inspector General:
Total Compensable Workyears:
Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTEs)

40
46
46

Proposed Distribution:
Direct

0
0
0
Offsetting Collections 1/
29
29
29
Auctions Credit Program Account
0
0
0
Universal Service Fund (USF) (Term)
11
17
17

TOTAL FTE - OIG

40
46
46

TOTAL FCC with OIG FTE

1,725
1,776
1,821

- 76 -




FY 2014 Budget Estimates to Congress

SUMMARY TABLES

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

REGULATORY FEES - CURRENT:

FY 2012

FY 2013

FY 2014

Object Class Description

Actual

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$186,196
$195,730
$202,925
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
47,935
50,186
52,127
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$234,131
$245,916
$255,052

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$15
$29
$29
Travel (21.0)
1,909
1,836
1,504
Transportation of Things (22.0)
109
126
128
GSA Rent (23.1)
36,873
36,769
37,504
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
7,229
7,438
6,987
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
1,155
1,012
1,033
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
23,805
19,046
23,856
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
3,360
3,319
3,885
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
23,166
21,451
21,355
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
1,760
1,797
1,833
Equipment (31.0)
4,969
8,043
6,133
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
206
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$104,556
$100,866
$104,247

Total Obligations from Regulatory Fees

$338,687
$346,782
$359,299

Total Resources from Regulatory Fees

$338,687
$346,782
$359,299
- 77 -




FY 2014 Budget Estimates to Congress

SUMMARY TABLES

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

AUCTIONS COST RECOVERY REIMBURSABLE AUTHORITY:

-- The following table depicts the distribution of the enacted resources for FY 2012, Congressional Request
for FY 2013, and estimated for FY 2014 obligations utilizing auctions cost recovery reimbursable authority.

FY 2012

FY 2013

FY 2014

Object Class Description

Actual

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$23,892
$27,366
$25,893
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
6,443
7,131
6,882
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$30,335
$34,497
$32,775

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$2
$4
$2
Travel (21.0)
324
482
330
Transportation of Things (22.0)
10
10
10
GSA Rent (23.1)
6,322
6,844
6,448
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
3,416
3,352
3,485
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
164
242
167
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
10,556
19,213
10,857
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
443
389
451
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
30,825
26,449
32,311
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
242
253
246
Equipment (31.0)
2,270
6,994
2,317
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
0
10
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$54,573
$64,242
$56,625

Total Auctions Cost Recovery

Reimbursable Obligations:

$84,908
$98,739 1/
$89,400
1/ The FCC received a Continuing Resolution Anomaly for FY 2013 in the amount of $13.7M for Auctions.
- 78 -




- 79 -




- 80 -




- 81 -




FY 2014 Budget Estimates to Congress

FCC SUMMARY TABLES (EXCLUDING OIG)

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

REGULATORY FEES - CURRENT (EXCLUDING OIG):

FY 2012

FY 2013

FY 2014

Object Class Description

Actual

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$182,776
$190,278
$197,425
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
47,045
48,895
50,825
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$229,821
$239,173
$248,250

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$15
$29
$29
Travel (21.0)
1,870
1,741
1,407
Transportation of Things (22.0)
109
126
128
GSA Rent (23.1)
36,530
36,418
37,147
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
7,224
7,438
6,987
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
1,155
1,012
1,032
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
19,164
17,494
20,032
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
3,360
3,319
3,885
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
23,166
21,451
21,355
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
1,760
1,797
1,833
Equipment (31.0)
4,852
8,034
6,125
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
206
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$99,411
$98,859
$99,960

Total Obligations from Regulatory Fees

$329,232
$338,032
$348,210

Total Resources from Regulatory Fees

$329,232
$338,032
$348,210
- 82 -




- 83 -




- 84 -




- 85 -




- 86 -




- 87 -




- 88 -



FY 2014 Budget Estimates to Congress

FCC OIG SUMMARY TABLES

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

CREDIT PROGRAM ACCOUNT (OIG):

-- The following table depicts the distribution of actual obligations from the Credit Program account for FY
2012 and estimated for FY 2013 and FY 2014. These obligations are presented in separate schedules
apart from the Salaries & Expenses account and funded from Permanent Indefinite Authority.

FY 2012

FY 2013

FY 2014

Object Class Description

Enacted

Cong. Request

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$53
$56
$153
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
15
16
37
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$68
$72
$190

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$0
$0
$0
Travel (21.0)
0
0
0
Transportation of Things (22.0)
0
0
0
GSA Rent (23.1)
0
0
0
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
0
0
0
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
0
0
0
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
233
233
233
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
0
0
0
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
0
0
0
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
0
0
0
Equipment (31.0)
0
0
0
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
0
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$233
$233
$233

Total Credit Program

$301
$305
$423

- 89 -




- 90 -



- 91 -



- 92 -




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- 94 -















EXHIBITS AND REPORTS









- 95 -




SPECTRUM AUCTION PROGRAM ACCOUNT

This program provided direct loans for the purpose of purchasing spectrum licenses at the Federal Communications Commission's auctions.
The licenses were purchased on an installment basis, which constitutes an extension of credit. The first year of activity for this program was 1996.
As required by the Federal Credit Refom Act of 1990, this account records, for this program, the subsidy costs associated with the direct loans
obligated in 1992 and beyond (including modifications of direct loans or loan guarantees that resulted from obligations or commitments in any year),
as well as administrative expenses of this program. The subsidy amounts are estimated on a present value basis and administrative expenses are
estimated on a cash basis. The FCC no longer offers credit terms on purchases through spectrum auctions. Program activity relates to
maintenance and close-out of existing loans.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


2012 Actual
2013 Est.
2014 Est.

Obligations by program activity:

0705 Reestimates of direct loan subsidy
$3
$0
$0
0706 Interest on reestimates of direct loan subsidy
15
0
0
0709 Administrative Expenses
1
4
2
0900 Total new obligations
$19
$4
$2

Budgetary resources available for obligation:

1000 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year
$4
$3
$3

Budget authority

1200 Appropriation, mandatory
$18
$4
$2
1260 Appropriation, mandatory (total)
$18
$4
$2
1930 Total budgetary resources available
$22
$7
$5

Memorandum (non-add) entries

1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year
$3
$3
$3

Change in obligated balances:

3000 Unpaid obligated balance, start of year
$2
$1
$1
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts
19
4
2
3020 Total outlays (gross)
(20)
(4)
(2)
3050 Unpaid obligation, end of year (gross)
$1
$1
$1
3100 Unpaid obligation, start of year (net)
$2
$1
$1
3100 Unpaid obligation, end of year (net)
$1
$1
$1

Budget authority and Outlays (net)

4090 Budget authority, gross
$18
$4
$2
Outlays, gross:
4100 Outlays from new mandatory authority
$0
$4
$2
4101 Outlays from mandatory balance
20
0
0
4110 Outlays gross (total)
$20
$4
$2
4160 Budget authority, net (mandatory)
$18
$4
$2
4170 Outlays, net (mandatory)
$20
$4
$2
4180 Budget authority, net (total)
$18
$4
$2
4190 Outlays, net (total)
$20
$4
$2
- 96 -



Summary of Loan levels, Subsidy Budget Authority and Outlays by Program (in millions of dollars)

2012 Actual
2013 Est.
2014 Est.

Direct loan upward reestimate:

1350 Spectrum auction
$18
$0
$0
1359 Total upward reestimate budget authority
0
0
0

Direct loan downward reestimate:

1370 Spectrum auction
0
0
0
1379 Total downward reestimate budget authority
0
0
0

Administrative expense data:

3510 Budget authority
1
1
1
3590 Outlays from new authority
1
1
1

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)

2012 Actual
2013 Est.
2014 Est.
1111 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent
$0
$1
$1
1252 Other services
0
1
0
1253 Other purch of goods & services from Government acct
0
2
1
1410 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
19
0
0
9999 Total new obligations
$19
$4
$2






- 97 -



SPECTRUM AUCTION DIRECT LOAN FINANCING ACCOUNT

As required by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, this non-budgetary account records all cash flows to and from the Government
resulting from direct loans obligated in 1992 and beyond (including modifications of direct loans that resulted from obligations in any year).
The amounts in this account are a means of financing and are not included in the budget totals.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


2012 Actual
2013 Est.
2014 Est.

Obligation by program activity:

Credit program obligations:

0713 Payement of interest to Treasury
$2
$7
$7
0900 Total new obligations
$2
$7
$7

Budgetary resources:

Unobligated balance:

1000 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year
$37
$5
$5
1023 Unobligated balance applied to repay debt
(33)
0
0
1050 Unobligated balance (total)
$4
$5
$5

Financing authority :

Borrowing authority, mandatory:

1400 Borrowing authority
$1
$7
$7
1440 Borrowing authority, mandatory (total)
$1
$7
$7

Spending authority from offsetting collections, mandatory:

1800 Offseting collections
$21
$0
$0
1825 Spending authority from offsetting collections applied to repay debt
(18)
0
0
1850 Spending authority from offsetting collections, mandatory:
$3
$0
$0
1900 Financing authority (total)
$4
$7
$7
1930 Total budgetary resources avaialble
$8
$12
$12

Memorandum (non-add) entries:

1941 Unexpirsed unobligated balance, end of year
$5
$5
$5

Change in obligated balances:

3010 Obligation incurred, unexpired accounts
$3
$7
$7
3020 Financing disbursements (gross)
(3)
(7)
(7)

Financing authority and disbursements, net

4090 Financing authority, gross (mandatory)
$4
$7
$7
4110 Fianncing disbursements, gross
$3
$7
$7
Offsetting against gross financing authority from:
4120 Federal sources
($18)
$0
$0
4122 Interest on uninvested funds
(3)
0
0
4123 Non-federal sources
0
0
0
4130 Offsets against gross fiancing authority and disbursements (total)
($21)
$0
$0
4160 Financing authority, net (mandory)
($17)
$7
$7
4170 Financing disbursements, net (mandatory)
($18)
$7
$7
4180 Financing authority, net (total)
($17)
$7
$7
4190 Financing disbursements, net (total)
($18)
$7
$7
- 98 -













RESPONSES TO CONGRESSIONAL INQUIRIES

CONCERNING GAO RECOMMENDATIONS




















- 99 -

- 100 -

- 101 -

- 102 -

- 103 -

- 104 -

- 105 -

- 106 -

- 107 -

- 108 -

Document Outline

  • CONNECT AMERICA
  • Regulatory Fees

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