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FCC Releases Telephone Numbering Resource Utilization Report

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Released: April 5, 2013



Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States

NRUF Data as of June 30, 2010
Porting and Toll-Free Data as of September 30, 2010






Craig Stroup
John Vu



Industry Analysis and Technology Division
Wireline Competition Bureau
April 2013

















This report is available for reference in the FCC's Reference Information Center, Courtyard Level, 445 12th
Street, SW, Washington, DC. Copies may be purchased by contacting Best Copy and Printing, Inc., 445
12th Street, SW, Room CY-B402, Washington, DC, telephone (800) 378-3160, or via their website at
www.bcpiweb.com. The report can also be downloaded from the Wireline Competition Bureau Statistical
Reports Internet site at www.fcc.gov/wcb/stats.






Contents

TEXT


Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................1
Findings ..................................................................................................................................................1
Background .............................................................................................................................................2
Analysis and Results ...............................................................................................................................4
Additional Information ...........................................................................................................................9
Technical Details ..................................................................................................................................10

TABLES


1. Number Utilization by Carrier Type as of June 30, 2010 ..............................................................12
2. Detail of Number Utilization: Non-rural Carriers (Reported at the Thousands-block Level).......12
3. Detail of Number Utilization: Rural Carriers (Reported at the NXX Level) ................................12
4. Telephone Number Utilization by State as of June 30, 2010 .........................................................13
5. Number of Carriers Reporting Numbering Resources as of June 30, 2010 ...................................14
6. Telephone Number Utilization by Area Code as of June 30, 2010 ................................................15
7. Assigned, Aging, and Available Telephone Numbers by Area Code as of June 30, 2010 ............20
8. Pooled Thousands-blocks as of June 30, 2010 ...............................................................................25
9. Increased Utilization and Telephone Numbers Saved due to Thousands-Block Pooling

as of June 30, 2010 .........................................................................................................................26
10. Number Utilization for Specialized Non-geographic Area Codes as of June 30, 2010 .................26
11. Alternate Sources of NPA-NXX Assignments...............................................................................31
12. Utilization over Time .....................................................................................................................31
13. NPA-NXX Assignments, Returns, and Net Assignments ..............................................................32
14. Telephone Number Porting Activity Since Wireless Porting Started ............................................33
15. Telephone Numbers Remaining in the Porting Database at the End of Each Quarter ...................34
16. Numbers in the Porting Database by Quarter in Which They Were Most Recently Ported

as of September 30, 2010 ...............................................................................................................35
17. Ports Between Carrier Types as of September 30, 2010 ................................................................36
18. Number of Carriers Porting or Receiving Ports as of September 30, 2010....................................37
19. Percentage of Numbers Ported as of June 30, 2010 .......................................................................38
20. Telephone Numbers Assigned for Toll-Free Service .....................................................................39
21. Telephone Numbers Assigned for 800 Toll-Free Service ..............................................................40
22. Telephone Numbers Assigned for 888 Toll-Free Service ..............................................................41
23. Telephone Numbers Assigned for 877 Toll-Free Service ..............................................................42
24. Telephone Numbers Assigned for 866 Toll-Free Service ..............................................................43
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Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States i





25. Area Codes by State (1947-2010) ..................................................................................................44
26. Area Code Assignments (1999-2009) ............................................................................................45
27. Number of Digits Necessary to Dial Local and Toll Calls from Wireline Phones

as of June 2010 ...............................................................................................................................47

CHARTS


1. Incumbent LECs: Average Utilization Rates by Number of Thousands-blocks Held

in a Rate Center ..............................................................................................................................27
2. Mobile Wireless: Average Utilization Rates by Number of Thousands-blocks Held

in a Rate Center ..............................................................................................................................28
3. CLECs: Average Utilization Rates by Number of Thousands-blocks Held in a Rate Center .......29
4. Paging Carriers: Average Utilization Rates by Number of Thousands-blocks Held

in a Rate Center ..............................................................................................................................30
5. NPA-NXX Assignments, Returns, and Net Assignments ..............................................................32













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Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States ii

Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States


NRUF Data as of June 30, 2010
Porting and Toll-Free Data as of September 30, 2010


Executive Summary


This is the Federal Communications Commission’s report on numbering resource utilization in
the United States.1 In this report, we summarize an ongoing systematic collection of comprehensive data
on the utilization of telephone numbers within the United States. The underlying information was
acquired from telecommunications carriers holding numbering resources and was analyzed as part of our
ongoing assessment of the efficacy of numbering resource optimization measures prescribed by the
Commission’s Numbering Resource Optimization (NRO) Orders.2

Findings



As of June 30, 2010:

 Overall, 47.9% of all telephone numbers were assigned to end users.

 The overall utilization rate for Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers (LECs) was 47.1%, down
from 47.3% six months earlier.

 The overall utilization rate for Mobile Wireless carriers was 66.8%, up from 66.7% six months
earlier.

 The overall utilization rate for Competitive LECs was 33.3%, down from 34.0% six months
earlier.

 Thousands-block pooling has made it unnecessary to distribute about 483 million telephone
numbers.

 Since wireless number portability began on November 24, 2003, wireline customers have moved
over 94 million telephone numbers to new wireline carriers and wireless customers moved almost
87 million telephone numbers to new wireless carriers. Over 4 million wireline telephone
numbers have been moved to wireless carriers and about 275,000 wireless numbers have been
moved to wireline carriers.

 In the second quarter of 2010, carriers returned 670,000 telephone numbers to the NANPA.


1 The previous edition of this report, with data as of December 31, 2009, was released in January 2011.
2 See Numbering Resource Optimization, CC Docket No. 99-200, Report and Order and Further Notice of Proposed
Rulemaking, 15 FCC Rcd 7574 (2000) (First NRO Order); Numbering Resource Optimization, CC Docket Nos. 99-
200, 96-98, Second Report and Order, Order on Reconsideration in CC Docket No. 96-98 and CC Docket No. 99-
200, and Second Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in CC Docket No. 99-200, 16 FCC Rcd 306 (2000)
(Second NRO Order); Numbering Resource Optimization, CC Docket Nos. 99-200, 96-98, 95-116, Third Report and
Order and Second Order on Reconsideration in CC Docket No. 96-98 and CC Docket No. 99-200, 17 FCC Rcd 252
(2001) (Third NRO Order); Numbering Resource Optimization, CC Docket Nos. 99-200, 96-98, 95-116, Fourth
Report and Order in CC Docket No. 99-200 and CC Docket No. 95-116, and Fourth Further Notice of Proposed
Rulemaking in CC Docket No. 99-200, 18 FCC Rcd 12472 (2003) (Fourth NRO Order).
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Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 1

 In the third quarter of 2010, carriers returned 770,000 telephone numbers to the NANPA.

Background



The United States uses ten-digit telephone numbers, which are organized in accordance with the
North American Numbering Plan (NANP).3 The NANP divides the country into separate geographic
areas called numbering plan areas (NPAs), more commonly called area codes. Calls between these areas
are generally dialed using the three-digit area code, followed by a seven-digit local telephone number.


When the NANP was established in 1947, only 78 area codes were assigned to
telecommunications carriers in the United States. Only 36 new codes were added through 1989. But the
rate of activation increased dramatically in the 1990s, when 109 new area codes were activated.4 Because
the remaining supply of unassigned area codes was diminishing, and because a premature exhaust of area
codes imposes significant costs on consumers, the Commission in 1999 initiated a proceeding to ensure
that the limited numbering resources are used efficiently and thereby slow telephone number exhaust.


In the First NRO Order, in 2000, the Commission established the requirement that
telecommunications carriers controlling numbering resources for the purpose of providing services to
their customers are required to file data on numbering resource utilization and forecasts twice a year.
Utilization data as of December 31 are due to the North American Numbering Plan Administrator
(NANPA) by February 1, and utilization data as of June 30 are due by August 1.5 The data are submitted
using FCC Form 502, the Numbering Resource Utilization/Forecast (NRUF) form. 6


The NANPA compiles the submitted NRUF information into a database and provides that
database to the Commission. The new NRUF-based information in this report is number utilization as of
June 30, 2010. The information in this report reflects all submissions and corrections received by the
NANPA through October 13, 2010. 7


Historically, local telephone companies received geographic numbers in blocks of 10,000. These
ten-thousands blocks of numbers are often called NXXs, or central office codes, and are identifiable as
the first three digits of a seven-digit telephone number.8 To improve the efficiency with which numbers
are used, the Commission’s NRO Orders established “thousands-block number pooling,” where an NXX
is broken into ten sequential blocks of 1,000 numbers.9 Carriers may then be required to donate unused or
underutilized blocks to the Pooling Administrator, which then assigns those thousands-blocks to other

3 The North American Numbering Plan is used in the United States and its territories, and in Canada, Bermuda, and
many Caribbean nations, including Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, British Virgin Islands,
Cayman Islands, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St.
Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Turks and Caicos Islands. The data contained in this
report are all limited to the United States and its overseas territories.
4 A database containing information about each area code is available at http://www.nanpa.com/npa/allnpas.zip.
5 First NRO Order, 15 FCC Rcd at 7603, para. 67. The NANPA currently is NeuStar, Inc.
6 FCC Form 502 and most other FCC forms can be downloaded via http://www.fcc.gov/formpage.html,
7 The NANPA’s database is continually updated because not all carriers file by the prescribed date, and because
carriers sometimes file updated information throughout the year.
8 That is, a ten-thousands block is the block of 10,000 telephone numbers that have the same area code and the same
NXX.
9 Pooling for wireline and wireless carriers started in November 2002. For a discussion of this requirement, see
Fourth NRO Order, 18 FCC Rcd at 12474-77, paras. 5–14.




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Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 2

carriers in need of numbers.10 This effectively allows the assignment of numbers in blocks of 1,000 rather
than 10,000. Most carriers are required to report their number utilization information at the thousands-
block level so that the Commission can evaluate the efficacy of telephone number pooling. However,
carriers that meet the statutory definition of “rural telephone company”11 and operate in non-pooling areas
submit their number utilization information at the ten-thousands block (NXX) level.


In this report, we present utilization data for four types of carriers:12

 Incumbent LECs
 Competitive LECs
 Mobile Wireless Carriers
 Paging Carriers


Carriers report on numbering resources in the following six categories:

 Assigned
 Intermediate
 Reserved
 Aging
 Administrative
 Available


An assigned number is one that is in use by an end-user customer. Intermediate numbers are
those that one carrier has made available for use by another carrier (or to a non-carrier) so that the
numbers may then be assigned to an end user. Reserved numbers are those that are being held by the
service provider at the request of an end user for future use. Aging numbers are those that are being held
out of use by the carrier for a period of time after the end user that last used them discontinues service.
Administrative numbers include test numbers and other numbers used for network management purposes.
Available numbers are numbers that are generally available for assignment to customers.13


Some carriers receive telephone numbers from other carriers. When this occurs, the carrier that
received its numbers from another carrier (as opposed to directly from the NANPA) is required to report
utilization data for those numbers, and to mark those numbers as having been received from other
carriers.14

10 The current Pooling Administrator is NeuStar, Inc., which is also the NANPA.
11 See 47 U.S.C. § 153(37).
12 Carriers classified themselves in a variety of ways on their NRUF forms. With one exception, each carrier type
was aggregated into one of these four categories for the purposes of this report. The exception involves carriers
calling themselves interexchange carriers. These carriers reported data for area codes 500 and 900, which are
summarized in Table 10 of this report. Therefore, there was no need to classify interexchange carriers as one of the
four carrier types listed above. Also, carriers may provide multiple types of services but report using a single
operating company number (OCN). Where this occurs, this may cause a problem because carriers must indicate
only their primary line of business on the NRUF form. Thus, for example, there is some potential that some
numbers are classified as mobile wireless but are really used for paging. Only small carriers seem to do this, so the
effects of this misclassification should be minor.
13 For precise definitions of these categories, see 47 C.F.R. § 52.15.
14 This means that sometimes more than one carrier can report utilization data for the same thousands-block (or
ten-thousands block). The NRUF form contains separate sections for reporting utilization data for numbers received
from another carrier and numbers received directly from the NANPA. Some carriers that receive numbers only



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Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 3



The vast majority of numbering resources reported were part of geographic area codes. That is,
the numbers were part of area codes that are associated with specific regions of the United States or
another country. For instance, area code 406 is associated with Montana, and area code 506 is associated
with New Brunswick, Canada. Carriers are also required to report on utilization of some non-geographic
area codes, such as 500 numbers and 900 numbers (which are described later in this report).


Carriers use other types of non-geographic numbering resources as well: millions of numbers are
used to provide toll-free services using non-geographic area codes such as 800, 888, 877 and 866. These
numbering resources are managed separately.

Analysis and Results


Table 1 shows the total quantity of telephone numbers reported by telecommunications carriers
and the number of ten-thousands blocks (NXXs) that were reported as of June 30, 2010. Table 1 also
shows the quantity of telephone numbers that carriers reported for each of the six categories described
above. The percentages for each of the six categories are provided as well.


Carriers reported usage data on 142,625 NXXs. This is up from the 141,738 NXXs in the
previous filing (data as of December 31, 2009). As the NANPA calculates that 144,692 NXXs have been
assigned to U.S. carriers,15 this round of submissions appears to have garnered usable information on over
98% of the numbering resources assigned to carriers in the United States. However, although the
reporting level is high, many carriers had not provided usable utilization data by October 13, 2010, which
was the cut-off date for inclusion in this report.


Carriers filing NRUF forms reported that about 677 million telephone numbers were assigned to
end users, and that 643 million were available for assignment. These 643 million available numbers do
not include any telephone numbers in NXXs that had not yet been assigned to a carrier. As more NXXs
are assigned to carriers by the NANPA, and more area codes are opened, more numbers will become
available. Intermediate, reserved, aging and administrative categories collectively account for another 94
million telephone numbers of the NXXs assigned to carriers. The quantity of incumbent LEC assigned
numbers is down slightly, reflecting the decreasing number of incumbent LEC lines.16 The quantity of
mobile wireless assigned numbers is up, reflecting that sector’s growth. The quantity of CLEC assigned
numbers continues to rise, in part, because of telephone service provided through voice over Internet
protocol (VoIP).


Table 2 presents statistics for numbers located in ten-thousands blocks for which carriers must
report the utilization information at the thousands-block level. As previously explained, carriers that do
not meet the statutory definition of a rural carrier are required to report in this manner.


Table 3 presents statistics for rural carriers, which are required to report only at the ten-thousands
block level.17 As might be expected, overall utilization rates are lower in rural areas (about 14% of

from other carriers use the incorrect section of the form, however, so within the database it can appear that more
than one carrier reported data for the same block of numbers.
15 The NANPA lists the codes that have been issued on its website at:
http://www.nanpa.com/reports/reports_cocodes_assign.html.
16 See Table 1 of the most recent Local Telephone Competition report at http://www.fcc.gov/wcb/iatd/comp.html.
17 See First NRO Order, 15 FCC Rcd at 7604-05, para. 71. A small number of rural carriers may operate in areas
with pooling. As all carriers in pooling areas are required to report at the thousands-block level, rural carriers in
pooling areas, if any, should be included in Table 2 rather than Table 3.



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Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 4

telephone numbers are assigned to end users) than in more urban areas (about 50% of telephone numbers
are assigned to end users).


Table 4 shows utilization statistics on a state-by-state basis. As might be expected, states that are
relatively rural and have low population densities have a lower percentage of numbers that have been
assigned to end-user customers than in more urban, populous states. Again, carriers report for only those
numbers that have been assigned to them, so the quantity of available numbers does not include any of the
NXXs that had not yet been assigned to a carrier.


Table 5 shows the number of carriers reporting telephone number utilization data for each state.
Carriers are required to report their NRUF data at the OCN level.18 Carriers typically obtain one or more
OCNs per state in which they operate. The number of carriers in each state is determined by counting the
number of OCNs reported in each state.


Table 6 shows utilization statistics on an area code-by-area code basis. The table also shows the
total number of OCNs reported in each area code. Again, carriers report for only those numbers that have
been assigned to them, so the quantity of available numbers does not include any of the NXXs in the state
that had not yet been assigned to a carrier.


Table 7 shows actual quantities of assigned, aging, and available numbers for wireline carriers
(incumbent LECs and CLECs) and for mobile wireless carriers on an area code-by-area code basis. The
information in Table 7 is useful for at least two reasons. First, while there is no information on the
number of working telephone lines in each area code, Table 7 provides at least some indication of what
these numbers are. For several reasons, however, the number of working lines per area code cannot be
perfectly divined from this information. Although mobile wireless carriers typically assign one
geographic telephone number to each mobile wireless telephone, some also assign telephone numbers to
other wireless devices. Similarly, wireline subscribers do not necessarily match the number of wireline
phone numbers. For instance some wireline customers want multiple telephone numbers associated with
a smaller number of lines. This is common when the customer has a PBX. Other wireline customers,
especially those expecting many inbound calls, such as to a help line, want a single telephone number that
serves many lines. Thus, the quantity of telephone numbers in an area code provides only a rough guide
to the number of lines in service in each area code.


Second, the information in Table 7 provides the only information available for examining churn.19
After a customer disconnects from a carrier’s network and chooses not to port the number to another
carrier, that carrier will hold that number out of circulation (“age” the number) for up to ninety days if the
customer was a residential subscriber, and up to one year if the customer was a business subscriber.
Therefore, the quantity of aging numbers gives some indication of the number of customers that have
disconnected from the carrier’s network in the previous three months to a year. For several reasons, aging
numbers, however, do not give a perfect indication of churn. Aside from not measuring numbers ported
to another carrier, not all carriers age their numbers for the full time allowed. In particular, where carriers
cannot immediately obtain new numbers from the NANPA or the pooling administrator because of area
code rationing, and the carriers have no other available numbers to assign to end users, carriers may
assign end users telephone numbers that have not been aged for the full time that the state regulatory
commissions have prescribed. (Thousands-block pooling alleviates this problem by making more
numbering resources available.) Moreover, as mentioned in the previous paragraph, wireline carriers do
not always issue one telephone number per line. Thus, as with line counts, churn rates can only be
roughly estimated from the data in Table 7.

18 See First NRO Order, 15 FCC Rcd at 7594, para. 41. Carriers obtain OCNs from the National Exchange Carrier
Association.
19 Churn is the rate at which customers change carriers or disconnect service.



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Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 5



Table 8 focuses on telephone number pooling. It shows the number of thousands-blocks that
carriers have received from the Pooling Administrator, the total number of thousands-blocks in telephone
rate centers where pooling exists,20 and the percentage of those thousands-blocks that are pooled.


A thousands-block is potentially poolable when 90% or more of the numbers are classified as
available for assignment. Pooling is required in the top 100 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs).21
Pooling also occurs in other areas where a state regulatory commission has exercised delegated authority
to require pooling.22 Carriers also have voluntarily implemented pooling in certain areas. The
Commission established an initial national roll-out schedule for thousands-block number pooling for
wireline carriers, which was completed in December 2003,23 and required most mobile wireless telephony
carriers to participate in that schedule starting in August 2003.24


Table 9 examines the efficacy of thousands-block pooling by showing the utilization of the
thousands-blocks that were distributed by the Pooling Administrator and the utilization rate that would
have resulted had whole NXXs been issued.25 Overall, if whole NXXs had been issued instead of
individual thousands-blocks, utilization within those blocks would have been about 22%. With pooling,
however, utilization was 64%, about a three-fold increase. Another way of measuring the benefit of
pooling is examining the quantity of telephone numbers saved through pooling. With pooling, 257
million telephone numbers were distributed to carriers in pooling areas. Had there been no pooling, over
740 million telephone numbers would have been distributed to the carriers. Thus, about 483 million
telephone numbers have been saved through thousands-block pooling.


Table 10 shows utilization data for two specialized non-geographic area codes: 500 and 900.
Area code 500 is used for “follow me” service, which, among other things, can be used to route an
incoming call to different phone numbers, depending on the time of day. Area code 900 is used for
information services where the caller is not charged the normal long distance rates set by the caller’s long
distance carrier, but usually is charged much higher prices that are preset by the call’s recipient.

20 A rate center is a geographic area used to determine distances and prices for local and long distance calls.
21 The composition of MSAs may change over time. If a rate center is part of a top 100 MSA at any time after 1990,
then the FCC generally requires number pooling. See Fourth NRO Order, 18 FCC Rcd at 12473, para. 2.
22 Most recently, the Commission granted authority to the Idaho, Alabama, and Wisconsin commissions to expand
pooling to areas outside of the top 100 MSAs. See Numbering Resource Optimization; Implementation of the Local
Competition Provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 1996
, WC Docket 07-118, CC Docket Nos. 99-200, 96-
98, Order, 22 FCC Rcd 16081 (2007). The Commission also has sought comment on whether it should delegate
authority to all states to implement mandatory pooling at their discretion. See Numbering Resource Optimization,
CC Docket No. 99-200, Order and Fifth Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, 21 FCC Rcd 1833 (2006).
23 See The Common Carrier Bureau Announces The First Quarter Schedule For National Thousands-Block Number
Pooling,
CC Docket No. 99-200, Public Notice, 17 FCC Rcd 103 (2001). See also Numbering Resource
Optimization
, CC Docket No. 99-200, Order, 17 FCC Rcd 7347 (2002).
24 See Fourth NRO Order, 18 FCC Rcd at 12473, para 1; 68 F.R, 43009, July 21, 2003. Thus, the Commission
required wireless telephone carriers to participate in thousands-block number pooling (starting on August 20, 2003)
somewhat before they were required to begin deploying local number portability (by November 24, 2003).
25 Calculating the utilization rate had whole NXXs been issued was a 4-step process: 1) the number of thousands-
blocks that a carrier held in a rate center was determined; 2) that number was rounded up to the next ten, which is
the number of thousands-blocks the carrier would have received if it had received whole NXXs; 3) the number in
step 2 was multiplied by 1,000 to calculate the total quantity of telephone numbers the carrier would have had in the
rate center; and 4) the number of telephone numbers that the carrier actually has in that rate center is then subtracted
from the quantity calculated in step 3.



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Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 6



Charts 1 through 4 focus on utilization rates as a function of the number of thousands-blocks that
carriers of different types hold within a local geographic area.26 These charts show average utilization
rates of incumbent LECs, mobile wireless carriers, CLECs, and paging carriers, respectively. We used
rate centers as our measure of local geographic area because thousands-blocks are assigned to carriers on
a rate-center basis. Carriers serving densely populated areas may need more than one thousands-block to
provide service. In these densely populated areas, carriers should generally be able to achieve higher
utilization rates than carriers serving less densely populated areas, where one thousands-block (or in many
rural areas, a ten-thousands block) may be used to serve just a few customers.


Table 11 focuses on NPA-NXX assignment information. There are three different databases that
contain sources of NPA-NXX assignment information: the NANPA’s NRUF database, the NANPA’s
NANP Administration System (NAS) database of NPA-NXX assignments, and the Local Exchange
Routing Guide (LERG).27 For a variety of reasons, the databases are not identical. Timing is a large
factor in the differences. For instance, during an area code split, a carrier will maintain both the old and
new NPA-NXXs in its systems during the phase called permissive dialing.28 After permissive dialing
ends, the carrier should remove the old NPA-NXXs from its systems. During permissive dialing, some
carriers report utilization data for both the old and the new NPA-NXXs. Further, some carriers may not
remove the old NPA-NXXs from their systems promptly after permissive dialing ends, and may therefore
report utilization data on both the old and the new NPA-NXXs. Also, carriers sometimes delay updating
the LERG after an NPA-NXX has been removed from their switch or when the carrier has given the
NPA-NXX back to the NANPA. Thus, the NRUF database, the NANPA assignment database, and the
LERG may not be identical. Table 11 shows the number of NPA-NXXs that appear in the three
databases.


Table 12 shows the percentage of numbers that have been assigned to end users over time. The
utilization rate for incumbent local exchange carriers is slowly declining and mobile wireless and CLEC
utilization rates are generally increasing. The utilization rate for paging continues to drop because the
paging market is shrinking.


Table 13 shows, on a quarterly basis, the number of NXX assignments made by the NANPA, the
number of NXXs that have been returned to the NANPA, and the number of net NXX assignments to
carriers. The table shows that fewer NXXs generally are being issued each quarter, and that carriers
continue to return unneeded NPA-NXXs to the NANPA for reassignment.


26 The points in Chart 1 were calculated using a three-step process. First, thousands-blocks were grouped depending
on the number of thousands-blocks held by a carrier within a rate center. Second, the number of thousands-blocks
held in a rate center was rounded to the nearest ten, to help protect the confidentiality of the data. Third, the average
utilization rates were calculated for each of the groups (i.e., from the group of 10 thousands-blocks per rate center
through the group of 1,000 thousands-blocks per rate center). For example, for all instances where a carrier reported
from 5 to 14 (which round to 10) thousands-blocks in a rate center, the average utilization rate was calculated. A
similar average utilization rate was calculated for all instances where, for a carrier in a rate center, the number of
thousands-blocks in a rate center was rounded to 20, 30, and so on through 1,000. To preserve carrier
confidentiality, some data points have been collapsed into a single data point. For example, if there were only two
companies with 350 thousands-blocks in a rate center, and another two companies with 360 thousands-blocks in a
rate center, those data points were collapsed. This way, no carrier-specific data are released.
27 The NANPA’s assignment information can be found online:
http://www.nanpa.com/reports/reports_cocodes_assign.html. The analysis in Table 11 examines only those codes
that NANPA marked “assigned” (i.e., this study does not examine those codes marked “protected”, “reserved”,
“unassignable”, or “vacant”). The LERG is published monthly by Telcordia Technologies.
28 During permissive dialing, a phone number may be called by using either the old or the new NPA.



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Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 7


Tables 14 through 16 display information on telephone number porting. All telephone number
porting information in this report is derived from the local number portability database, which was
designed solely for the purpose of routing calls.29 There are several reasons that the quantity of ported
numbers in the database at any given time does not equal the sum of numbers ported in prior months.
When consumers who have already ported their telephone numbers do so again, the porting database
retains only the most recent porting activity for those numbers. Consumers can also port their numbers
back to the original carrier.30 When this happens, it is counted as a port even though the number drops
out of the porting database.31 Also, carriers sometimes port blocks of numbers to other carriers before
reassigning them in the LERG. Once the numbers are reassigned, they can be dropped from the porting
database.


Table 14 shows, on a quarterly basis, the quantities of telephone numbers that have been ported
since wireless porting started on November 24, 2003. The table shows that most porting activity is
intramodal, that is between two landline carriers or between two mobile carriers. Many telephone
numbers are ported so that they can be used with VoIP-based telephony. Because almost all VoIP
providers get their numbers from CLECs, telephone numbers that are ported for VoIP-based service are
included in the wireline-to-wireline totals.


Table 15 shows the quantity of telephone numbers in the porting database at the end of each
quarter. Table 16 is based on ports in the database as of September 30, 2010, and shows the quarter in
which the numbers were ported. Table 17 shows the number of ports in the database on a state-by-state
basis, and Table 18 shows the number of carriers involved in porting on a state-by-state basis. Table 19
shows the percentage of assigned numbers that were ported.32


Customers may port their numbers multiple times, and in doing so, they may change the nature of
their service (wireline versus wireless), so there are two possible methods of determining whether a
number was ported from a wireline carrier or not. The first method is to use the type of carrier that is
currently porting the number away from itself, and the second is to determine which type of carrier
originally held the number. The choice of methodologies depends on what is being measured. Because it
is useful to know porting patterns for numbers as they are currently being used, Tables 14 and 19 use the
porting carrier’s type to establish whether a wireline or wireless number is being ported. For the rest of
the tables, the original carrier’s type is used to determine the porting carrier’s type. This is done so that
the number of wireless subscribers can be better determined.33 For instance, in order to properly calculate
the number of wireless units at a particular point in time using telephone number data, one can take the
quantity of wireless assigned numbers as reported on NRUF forms, add the number of wireline to
wireless ports and subtract the number of wireless to wireline ports.


29 NeuStar, Inc. currently is the portability administrator and operates seven different porting databases.
Commission staff combines information from these databases into a single database.
30 When a customer who is using a ported number discontinues service entirely, the ported number also goes back to
the original carrier.
31 Area code splits can cause a number that was at one time ported from Carrier A to Carrier B to appear to be ported
from Carrier A to Carrier B at a later date than actually occurred, as the database record must be updated to reflect
the new area code. When this happens, the old porting record also disappears from the database.
32 Paging carriers are not required to port numbers.
33 According to NRUF rules, a number that is ported to another carrier is classified as assigned. In order to avoid
double counting, the recipient of the ported number does not report ported numbers in NRUF. See 47 C.F.R. §
52.15 (f)(1)(v).



U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 8


Tables 20 through 24 show information about toll-free numbers in the North American
Numbering Plan. AT&T introduced toll-free service in 1967. The Commission changed procedures for
routing toll-free calls on May 1, 1993 to make toll-free numbers "portable." This change enabled
customers to switch service providers yet retain their toll-free numbers. The quantity of assigned toll-free
numbers grew rapidly, and new toll-free calling codes were opened to meet the demand. In March 1996,
calling code 888 was placed into service. The third toll-free calling code (877) went into effect April 4,
1998, and the fourth toll-free calling code (866) went into effect July 29, 2000. The Wireline
Competition Bureau authorized Database Service Management Inc. (DSMI), which maintains the Toll-
Free Service Management System for the United States and Canada, to open the 855 toll-free area code
on October 1, 2010.34 In the event that another toll-free code is needed, the 844 code would be opened.


As of September 30, 2010, there were over 28 million toll-free numbers assigned. Tables 21
through 24 show the growth of each individual toll-free code over the past decade: 800, 888, 877, and
866, respectively.


Table 25 shows the current list of area codes, the state or territory they serve, and the month the
code was opened. Table 26 shows area code assignments since January 1999, along with the month the
code was added, and the code that served the area previously.


Table 27 shows how dialing patterns differ from state to state. For instance, in some states,
callers making local calls within an area code are required to dial only the 7-digit phone number. In other
states, callers making local calls must dial the ten-digit phone number (area code plus the phone number).
Finally, in some states, local callers must dial a “1” before dialing the area code plus the phone number.
Each state’s public utilities commission (or public service commission) determines the calling pattern for
each area code in their state.35


For both local and domestic toll calls, there are two basic types of calls: those within an area
code and those between area codes. Table 27 shows the dialing patterns for all four types of calls. The
last column of Table 27 indicates whether all toll calls in that state require callers to dial a “1” before the
telephone number.

Additional Information



Additional information too lengthy to include in this report is contained on the Commission’s
website.36 The first set of additional information lists the more than 2,700 filers. The list includes the
service provider’s name, its parent name, and its OCN.


The second set of information shows, by carrier type and by rate center, the number of assigned
telephone numbers and the number of thousands-blocks reported in that rate center. Some information
has been redacted (asterisked out), to prevent the potential release of non-public data. The information

34 See http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-10-1117A1.pdf.
35 The dialing patterns for area codes are listed in the area code database, which can be found at
http://www.nanpa.com/area_codes/index.html.
36 This report and additional numbering information can be found at http://www.fcc.gov/wcb/iatd/number.html. All
of the Industry Analysis & Technology Division’s reports are available on the web, and are conveniently
categorized. See http://www.fcc.gov/wcb/stats.



U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 9

also includes the Metropolitan Statistical Area/Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area in which the rate
center resides.37


The pooling information submitted by NeuStar, Inc. is also available, and includes the NPA,
NXX, X (block number), recipient carrier, date of assignment for the block, and other information about
the block. NeuStar, Inc. submitted pooling data as of October 15, 2010. For consistency with the latest
available NRUF data, only blocks whose assignment was effective by June 30, 2010 were used in creating
the tables for this report.

Technical Details



The following material provides technical details on the data and procedures used in this analysis.
With respect to Tables 1 through 3, the reader should note that the number of unique NXXs for each
carrier type does not add up to the total number of unique NXXs.38 This discrepancy occurs when
multiple carriers report data for the same numbering resource. In addition, some carriers reported at the
thousands-block level and other carriers reported at the NXX level for the same NXX. Further, when all
mobile wireless devices were assigned telephone numbers and subscribers generally carried one mobile
device for making voice calls, NRUF provided reasonably accurate measures of mobile wireless
telephone subscribership. However, consumers are now more likely to use more than one mobile device
– particularly non-voice devices, such as Internet access devices (e.g., wireless modem cards, netbooks,
and mobile Wi-Fi hotspots), e-readers, tablets, and telematics systems – that commonly are assigned
telephone numbers. In addition, certain mobile broadband providers do not assign telephone numbers to
some or all of the devices on their networks. This trend became noticeable around 2005, and since that
time, the wireless NRUF data has reflected the number of individual subscribers plus a share of the
mobile wireless connections or connected devices.39


In the past, when numbers were transferred from an incumbent LEC to another carrier, these
numbers were classified as “assigned” because those numbers could not be used elsewhere in the
incumbent LEC’s own system. According to the Commission’s standardized definitions, however, these
numbers are classified as “intermediate” numbers. It appears that some large carriers have not reported
these numbers as intermediate numbers. Because, in many instances, we were unable to match
submissions that report intermediate numbers with submissions that report numbers as being received
from another carrier, we had to create filters to ensure that numbers were not double counted.


Where a Regional Bell Operating Company (RBOC) has acquired a carrier with CLEC services
in the RBOC's operating region, the numbering resources of the acquired CLEC that are in the RBOC's
operating region are counted as incumbent LEC resources. Where the acquired CLEC provides services
outside of the acquirer's operating region, the numbering resources are treated as CLEC resources.


For ease of comparison, Charts 1 through 4 plot utilization rates only when there were 1,000 or
fewer thousands-blocks in a rate center. Some incumbent LECs reported more than 1,000 unique
thousands-blocks in a single rate center. The average utilization rates in these instances (where the carrier
has more than 1,000 thousands blocks in a rate center) were the same as the instances where the carrier
has just fewer than 1,000 thousands blocks in a rate center. Therefore, the charts show only the data

37 The rate center’s V&H coordinates from the LERG were used to determine in which MSA/PMSA the rate center
resided. If the rate center is not in an MSA/PMSA, then the MSA/PMSA variable is left blank.
38 In some instances, more than one carrier reported numbering utilization data for the same NPA-NXX. Tables 1-3
report on the number of unique NPA-NXXs that were reported by each carrier type and by the industry as a whole.
39 See Fifteenth CMRS Report pages 8 – 9. http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-11-103A1.doc.



U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 10

where the carriers reported up to 1,000 thousands-blocks within a rate center. This allows a linear scale to
be used.


In some instances, we observed that some CLECs had a large number of thousands-blocks in a
single rate center. Although most CLECs do not have enough end-user lines in a rate center to warrant
having so many thousands-blocks in that rate center, there are at least two reasons that a CLEC would do
so. First, some CLECs provide service to unified messaging services, such as e-fax.40 These services use
large quantities of numbers.41 Also, VoIP providers generally obtain NANP telephone numbers for their
customers by partnering with a local exchange carrier, such as a CLEC, through a commercial
arrangement rather than obtaining them directly from a numbering administrator.

* * * *


We invite users of this information to provide suggestions for improved data collection and
analysis by using the attached customer response form, e-mailing comments to craig.stroup@fcc.gov,
john.vu@fcc.gov, or calling the Industry Analysis and Technology Division at (202) 418-0940 (for TTY,
call (202) 418-0484).

40 Unified messaging services allow end users to receive multiple types of messages (such as voice mail and faxes)
at one phone number. Typically, these messages are then digitized and e-mailed to the end user. Because the end
user does not need to answer the call personally, the messages can be sent to any phone number in the United States.
Thus, unified messaging service providers can operate efficiently by obtaining a large number of thousands blocks
in a single rate center.
41 Carriers assigning numbers to unified messaging services are instructed to report numbers as “intermediate” until
the numbers are assigned by the unified messaging service providers to end users. Some carriers have assigned
large quantities of numbers to unified messaging services but may not have received information back from the
unified messaging company as to whether those numbers had been assigned to end users. This may explain why
some carriers reported dozens of NXXs in a single rate center, yet classified all those numbers as intermediate rather
than assigned.



U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 11

Table 1

Number Utilization by Carrier Type as of June 30, 2010

Assigned
Intermediate
Reserved
Aging
Admin
Available1
Total
Unique
Carrier Type
(Thousands of telephone numbers)
NXXs
Incumbent LEC
273,048
14,823
4,511
11,851
14,692
261,003
579,928
67,451
Mobile Wireless
293,710
1,135
927
14,340
4,583
124,793
439,488
58,714
CLEC
105,718
11,136
4,914
7,788
1,578
186,422
317,555
52,558
Paging
4,082
554
498
567
200
70,591
76,492
5,812
All Reporting Carriers
676,558
27,648
10,849
34,546
21,053
642,809
1,413,463
142,6252
Incumbent LEC
47.1%
2.6%
0.8%
2.0%
2.5%
45.0%
100.0%
Mobile Wireless
66.8%
0.3%
0.2%
3.3%
1.0%
28.4%
100.0%
CLEC
33.3%
3.5%
1.6%
2.5%
0.5%
58.7%
100.0%
Paging
5.3%
0.7%
0.7%
0.7%
0.3%
92.3%
100.0%
All Reporting Carriers
47.9%
2.0%
0.8%
2.4%
1.5%
45.5%
100.0%

Table 2

Detail of Number Utilization: Non-rural Carriers (Reported at the Thousands-block Level)

Assigned
Intermediate
Reserved
Aging
Admin
Available1
Total
Unique
Carrier Type
(Thousands of telephone numbers)
NXXs
Incumbent LEC
264,651
14,201
3,606
11,266
14,250
214,525
522,498
61,728
Mobile Wireless
291,856
1,082
798
14,166
4,442
118,258
430,603
57,874
CLEC
105,134
11,102
4,743
7,750
1,528
178,810
309,068
51,832
Paging
3,818
309
419
533
154
65,068
70,302
5,241
All Reporting Carriers
665,459
26,695
9,566
33,716
20,374
576,661
1,332,471 135,0552
Incumbent LEC
50.7%
2.7%
0.7%
2.2%
2.7%
41.1%
100.0%
Mobile Wireless
67.8%
0.3%
0.2%
3.3%
1.0%
27.5%
100.0%
CLEC
34.0%
3.6%
1.5%
2.5%
0.5%
57.9%
100.0%
Paging
5.4%
0.4%
0.6%
0.8%
0.2%
92.6%
100.0%
All Reporting Carriers
49.9%
2.0%
0.7%
2.5%
1.5%
43.3%
100.0%

Table 3

Detail of Number Utilization: Rural Carriers (Reported at the NXX Level)

Assigned
Intermediate
Reserved
Aging
Admin
Available1
Total
Unique
Carrier Type
(Thousands of telephone numbers)
NXXs
Incumbent LEC
8,397
621
905
586
443
46,478
57,430
5,742
Mobile Wireless
1,854
53
129
174
142
6,535
8,886
881
CLEC
584
34
171
37
49
7,612
8,487
845
Paging
264
245
79
33
45
5,523
6,189
571
All Reporting Carriers
11,099
952
1,283
830
679
66,148
80,992 8,0172
Incumbent LEC
14.6%
1.1%
1.6%
1.0%
0.8%
80.9%
100.0%
Mobile Wireless
20.9%
0.6%
1.5%
2.0%
1.6%
73.6%
100.0%
CLEC
6.9%
0.4%
2.0%
0.4%
0.6%
89.7%
100.0%
Paging
4.3%
4.0%
1.3%
0.5%
0.7%
89.2%
100.0%
All Reporting Carriers
13.7%
1.2%
1.6%
1.0%
0.8%
81.7%
100.0%
Source: Numbering Resource Utilization/Forecast Reports data filed with NeuStar, Inc. as of October 13, 2010 (98% of NXXs reported).
1 Includes only telephone numbers in NXXs assigned to carriers and therefore available for assignment to customers.
Does not include any numbers in NXXs that have not yet been assigned to carriers.
2 Unduplicated total.
Note: Figures may not add due to rounding. Where an RBOC has acquired a carrier with CLEC services in the RBOC's operating region,
the numbering resources of the acquired CLEC that are in the RBOC's operating region are counted as incumbent LEC resources. Where
the acquired CLEC provides services outside of the acquirer's operating region, the numbering resources are treated as CLEC resources.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 12

Table 4

Telephone Number Utilization by State as of June 30, 2010

Assigned
Intermediate
Reserved
Aging
Administrative
Available1
Total
State/Jurisdiction
000s
%
000s
%
000s
%
000s
%
000s
%
000s
%
000s
Alabama
9,534
41.4
813
3.5
134
0.6
629
2.7
495
2.2
11,398
49.6
23,002
Alaska
1,553
26.3
81
1.4
32
0.5
95
1.6
45
0.8
4,094
69.4
5,900
American Samoa
27
68.7
0
0.0
1
1.9
0
1.1
1
2.0
11
26.3
40
Arizona
13,410
60.8
288
1.3
242
1.1
740
3.4
302
1.4
7,058
32.0
22,039
Arkansas
5,221
36.2
411
2.8
48
0.3
209
1.4
207
1.4
8,332
57.7
14,427
California
81,166
51.5
4,182
2.7
795
0.5
4,109
2.6
3,604
2.3
63,596
40.4
157,452
Colorado
12,549
58.0
159
0.7
249
1.2
620
2.9
433
2.0
7,618
35.2
21,628
Connecticut
7,979
52.6
353
2.3
102
0.7
324
2.1
208
1.4
6,193
40.9
15,159
Delaware
2,707
57.2
33
0.7
39
0.8
104
2.2
27
0.6
1,826
38.6
4,736
District of Columbia
4,502
73.4
67
1.1
69
1.1
161
2.6
45
0.7
1,291
21.0
6,136
Florida
39,142
53.4
2,523
3.4
420
0.6
3,070
4.2
1,461
2.0
26,653
36.4
73,269
Georgia
19,842
47.6
1,952
4.7
244
0.6
1,329
3.2
868
2.1
17,454
41.9
41,689
Guam
237
33.2
0
0.0
2
0.3
15
2.1
2
0.2
456
64.1
712
Hawaii
2,833
56.6
13
0.3
21
0.4
150
3.0
183
3.7
1,806
36.1
5,007
Idaho
2,994
44.5
119
1.8
121
1.8
129
1.9
204
3.0
3,164
47.0
6,731
Illinois
28,879
45.4
710
1.1
592
0.9
1,365
2.1
760
1.2
31,307
49.2
63,613
Indiana
11,636
41.6
543
1.9
129
0.5
544
1.9
404
1.4
14,744
52.7
28,000
Iowa
7,171
34.5
284
1.4
260
1.3
256
1.2
191
0.9
12,640
60.8
20,802
Kansas
5,424
31.8
503
2.9
97
0.6
245
1.4
164
1.0
10,640
62.3
17,073
Kentucky
8,059
37.1
630
2.9
121
0.6
409
1.9
413
1.9
12,111
55.7
21,743
Louisiana
8,886
40.5
740
3.4
82
0.4
638
2.9
683
3.1
10,932
49.8
21,961
Maine
2,597
41.0
59
0.9
147
2.3
121
1.9
115
1.8
3,302
52.1
6,341
Maryland
15,172
57.5
98
0.4
155
0.6
747
2.8
186
0.7
10,036
38.0
26,393
Massachusetts
20,472
53.2
241
0.6
534
1.4
929
2.4
285
0.7
16,053
41.7
38,512
Michigan
21,030
40.8
402
0.8
305
0.6
900
1.7
533
1.0
28,419
55.1
51,588
Minnesota
12,136
42.3
274
1.0
276
1.0
424
1.5
287
1.0
15,277
53.3
28,674
Mississippi
4,838
29.8
392
2.4
72
0.4
278
1.7
335
2.1
10,314
63.6
16,229
Missouri
11,632
39.1
650
2.2
147
0.5
579
1.9
253
0.9
16,465
55.4
29,727
Montana
1,754
27.1
35
0.5
88
1.4
61
0.9
61
1.0
4,468
69.1
6,468
Nebraska
3,712
34.9
77
0.7
46
0.4
112
1.1
99
0.9
6,586
61.9
10,634
Nevada
5,533
55.8
367
3.7
35
0.3
390
3.9
114
1.1
3,469
35.0
9,908
New Hampshire
3,344
45.8
13
0.2
223
3.1
176
2.4
57
0.8
3,490
47.8
7,302
New Jersey
22,107
53.5
206
0.5
255
0.6
979
2.4
311
0.8
17,469
42.3
41,327
New Mexico
3,813
48.3
56
0.7
132
1.7
212
2.7
118
1.5
3,559
45.1
7,890
New York
46,887
57.3
800
1.0
749
0.9
2,181
2.7
655
0.8
30,550
37.3
81,822
North Carolina
19,030
49.3
1,372
3.6
370
1.0
1,166
3.0
653
1.7
15,991
41.4
38,582
North Dakota
1,270
21.5
33
0.6
34
0.6
28
0.5
84
1.4
4,461
75.5
5,911
Northern Marianas Is
56
21.6
0
0.0
28
10.8
1
0.4
0
0.0
175
67.2
260
Ohio
23,902
46.0
1,127
2.2
174
0.3
1,161
2.2
647
1.2
24,985
48.1
51,996
Oklahoma
6,760
35.0
607
3.1
49
0.3
306
1.6
192
1.0
11,386
59.0
19,300
Oregon
7,869
50.8
178
1.1
255
1.6
355
2.3
243
1.6
6,602
42.6
15,502
Pennsylvania
28,671
48.8
425
0.7
905
1.5
1,334
2.3
413
0.7
27,043
46.0
58,791
Puerto Rico
4,691
58.1
63
0.8
71
0.9
213
2.6
89
1.1
2,951
36.5
8,079
Rhode Island
3,123
59.5
24
0.5
47
0.9
103
2.0
25
0.5
1,924
36.7
5,246
South Carolina
8,653
46.8
774
4.2
110
0.6
530
2.9
396
2.1
8,033
43.4
18,496
South Dakota
1,475
24.8
29
0.5
41
0.7
58
1.0
51
0.9
4,285
72.1
5,939
Tennessee
13,314
48.7
1,052
3.8
249
0.9
845
3.1
536
2.0
11,328
41.5
27,324
Texas
50,743
46.1
2,637
2.4
540
0.5
2,642
2.4
2,160
2.0
51,391
46.7
110,113
Utah
6,420
56.6
121
1.1
110
1.0
259
2.3
194
1.7
4,233
37.3
11,337
Vermont
2,279
42.2
16
0.3
108
2.0
61
1.1
50
0.9
2,886
53.4
5,401
Virgin Islands
169
46.8
15
4.3
29
8.2
47
13.2
2
0.6
97
27.0
360
Virginia
19,124
59.6
202
0.6
240
0.7
925
2.9
258
0.8
11,326
35.3
32,074
Washington
15,689
56.8
435
1.6
236
0.9
696
2.5
505
1.8
10,072
36.4
27,633
West Virginia
2,888
43.4
106
1.6
50
0.8
115
1.7
68
1.0
3,429
51.5
6,657
Wisconsin
10,559
39.1
339
1.3
206
0.8
396
1.5
309
1.1
15,192
56.3
27,002
Wyoming
1,096
31.1
18
0.5
33
0.9
74
2.1
66
1.9
2,241
63.5
3,527
Totals
676,558
47.9
27,648
2.0
10,849
0.8
34,546
2.4
21,053
1.5
642,810
45.5
1,413,465
Source: Numbering Resource Utilization/Forecast Reports data filed with NeuStar, Inc. as of October 13, 2010
1 Includes only telephone numbers in NXXs assigned to carriers and therefore available for assignment to customers.
Does not include any numbers in NXXs that have not yet been assigned to carriers.
Note: Figures may not add due to rounding
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 13

Table 5

Number of Carriers Reporting Numbering Resources as of June 30, 20101

Paging
Unduplicated
State/jurisdiction
Incumbent LEC2 Mobile Wireless2
CLEC2
Carriers2
Total Carriers
Alabama
32
18
34
9
93
Alaska
24
13
5
0
41
American Samoa
0
1
0
0
1
Arizona
18
13
29
6
66
Arkansas
32
9
19
5
65
California
25
16
66
11
117
Colorado
35
18
31
6
91
Connecticut
3
8
25
3
38
Delaware
1
8
24
5
38
District of Columbia
1
7
29
4
41
Florida
14
16
58
7
94
Georgia
36
18
54
6
114
Guam
2
4
2
0
8
Hawaii
2
6
6
1
15
Idaho
24
16
23
6
69
Illinois
56
18
53
5
132
Indiana
43
17
47
4
111
Iowa
157
17
67
3
244
Kansas
46
15
33
4
98
Kentucky
21
20
45
3
89
Louisiana
22
15
31
5
73
Maine
23
9
23
3
58
Maryland
2
11
42
4
59
Massachusetts
5
8
34
3
50
Michigan
40
19
49
5
112
Minnesota
93
13
67
2
175
Mississippi
20
14
29
5
68
Missouri
47
17
38
7
109
Montana
21
10
18
0
49
Nebraska
48
16
23
2
89
Nevada
13
12
30
4
59
New Hampshire
12
10
23
4
49
New Jersey
3
9
49
4
65
New Mexico
19
17
22
3
61
New York
42
9
53
5
109
North Carolina
30
14
41
5
89
North Dakota
36
10
18
1
65
Northern Marianas Is
1
2
0
0
3
Ohio
42
20
54
2
116
Oklahoma
44
18
24
3
89
Oregon
33
10
38
3
84
Pennsylvania
40
21
53
7
120
Puerto Rico
1
6
6
1
14
Rhode Island
1
8
16
3
28
South Carolina
27
12
39
1
78
South Dakota
46
10
23
1
80
Tennessee
28
18
43
5
94
Texas
65
30
71
12
177
Utah
18
15
23
2
58
Vermont
10
9
14
3
36
Virgin Islands
1
4
0
0
5
Virginia
20
15
51
5
90
Washington
25
12
45
6
88
West Virginia
8
14
18
5
45
Wisconsin
90
21
43
7
161
Wyoming
16
14
13
0
43
Unduplicated Totals
1,379
296
1,595
80
3,339
Source: Numbering Resource Utilization/Forecast Reports data filed with NeuStar, Inc. as of October 13, 2010
1 Company numbers determined by counting operating company numbers (OCNs). Carriers typically obtain at least
one OCN per state in which they do business. Thus, carriers with multiple OCNs are counted multiple times with the
exception that is noted following Table 3.
2 Carriers occasionally misclassify the type of service that they provide. For instance, the CLEC operations of
incumbent LECs are occasionally classified as incumbent LEC operations.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 14

Table 6

Telephone Number Utilization by Area Code as of June 30, 2010

Area Code State/Jurisdiction
Area Code Opened
Assigned
Intermediate
Reserved
Aging
Admin
Available
OCNs
201
New Jersey
January-47
57.6%
0.6%
0.5%
2.6%
0.8%
37.8%
49
202
District of Columbia January-47
73.4%
1.1%
1.1%
2.6%
0.7%
21.0%
43
203
Connecticut
January-47
55.4%
3.0%
0.8%
2.3%
1.7%
36.7%
37
205
Alabama
January-47
48.4%
4.1%
0.5%
2.9%
2.7%
41.3%
43
206
Washington
January-47
64.8%
0.8%
0.5%
2.5%
2.1%
29.3%
40
207
Maine
January-47
41.0%
0.9%
2.3%
1.9%
1.8%
52.1%
58
208
Idaho
January-47
44.5%
1.8%
1.8%
1.9%
3.0%
47.0%
69
209
California
January-58
46.5%
3.2%
0.3%
1.9%
2.3%
45.7%
45
210
Texas
November-92
64.4%
3.8%
0.4%
3.3%
1.3%
26.8%
38
212
New York
January-47
73.9%
0.0%
1.7%
2.3%
1.4%
20.7%
32
213
California
January-47
43.0%
1.3%
0.6%
3.5%
2.1%
49.4%
55
214
Texas
January-47
64.2%
0.5%
0.5%
2.9%
2.5%
29.4%
51
215
Pennsylvania
January-47
60.1%
0.1%
1.6%
2.2%
0.9%
35.1%
43
216
Ohio
January-47
51.4%
0.8%
0.3%
3.4%
1.5%
42.7%
35
217
Illinois
January-47
32.6%
1.4%
0.2%
1.1%
1.3%
63.4%
48
218
Minnesota
January-47
23.7%
2.1%
0.8%
0.9%
0.7%
71.9%
70
219
Indiana
January-47
43.4%
2.0%
0.5%
2.0%
1.5%
50.7%
35
224
Illinois
January-02
55.0%
1.7%
1.2%
3.0%
1.3%
37.8%
33
225
Louisiana
August-98
48.1%
4.1%
0.4%
3.3%
3.4%
40.7%
36
228
Mississippi
September-97
32.2%
1.5%
0.3%
1.8%
2.8%
61.3%
32
229
Georgia
August-00
28.2%
3.9%
0.3%
1.9%
0.7%
65.0%
41
231
Michigan
June-99
28.7%
0.8%
0.6%
1.1%
0.9%
67.9%
42
234
Ohio
October-00
27.3%
4.8%
0.1%
1.3%
0.6%
65.9%
24
239
Florida
March-02
54.6%
0.2%
0.4%
4.4%
0.5%
39.9%
27
240
Maryland
June-97
58.1%
0.7%
0.3%
4.1%
0.4%
36.3%
47
248
Michigan
May-97
51.0%
0.6%
0.5%
2.4%
1.2%
44.3%
43
251
Alabama
June-01
39.9%
3.0%
0.7%
2.0%
2.8%
51.5%
43
252
North Carolina
March-98
40.7%
1.3%
0.1%
3.5%
0.6%
53.7%
36
253
Washington
April-97
57.7%
2.9%
0.7%
3.2%
1.3%
34.1%
39
254
Texas
May-97
32.9%
1.9%
0.3%
2.3%
2.6%
60.1%
43
256
Alabama
March-98
44.2%
3.6%
0.8%
3.6%
1.6%
46.2%
43
260
Indiana
January-02
39.8%
2.1%
0.6%
1.2%
1.8%
54.4%
35
262
Wisconsin
September-99
42.2%
1.5%
0.8%
1.6%
0.8%
53.2%
43
267
Pennsylvania
July-99
44.3%
0.6%
0.7%
4.0%
0.5%
50.0%
45
269
Michigan
July-02
37.4%
0.8%
0.9%
1.8%
1.5%
57.6%
52
270
Kentucky
April-99
32.1%
3.1%
0.4%
1.6%
1.0%
61.8%
51
276
Virginia
September-01
35.3%
0.8%
0.2%
3.1%
0.9%
59.7%
41
281
Texas
November-96
52.6%
2.6%
0.2%
3.1%
1.3%
40.2%
45
301
Maryland
January-47
59.2%
0.2%
0.5%
2.1%
0.9%
37.0%
48
302
Delaware
January-47
57.2%
0.7%
0.8%
2.2%
0.6%
38.6%
40
303
Colorado
January-47
65.3%
0.4%
1.1%
2.7%
2.8%
27.6%
39
304
West Virginia
January-47
43.8%
1.6%
0.8%
1.7%
1.0%
51.0%
44
305
Florida
January-47
55.4%
6.4%
0.6%
4.3%
2.8%
30.5%
42
307
Wyoming
January-47
31.1%
0.5%
0.9%
2.1%
1.9%
63.5%
43
308
Nebraska
January-55
17.2%
0.7%
0.4%
0.8%
1.1%
79.8%
52
309
Illinois
January-57
30.6%
0.9%
0.6%
1.3%
1.5%
65.2%
56
310
California
November-91
62.5%
1.0%
0.5%
2.8%
2.5%
30.8%
48
312
Illinois
January-47
56.6%
1.9%
0.4%
2.3%
1.9%
36.9%
39
313
Michigan
January-47
48.3%
1.6%
0.3%
2.9%
1.0%
45.9%
41
314
Missouri
January-47
58.6%
2.8%
0.5%
2.8%
1.4%
33.9%
31
315
New York
January-47
41.2%
1.4%
1.0%
1.6%
0.6%
54.1%
46
316
Kansas
January-47
48.8%
3.3%
0.9%
1.9%
1.2%
43.8%
29
317
Indiana
January-47
54.5%
2.3%
0.5%
2.8%
1.6%
38.4%
43
318
Louisiana
January-57
35.5%
2.8%
0.2%
1.9%
3.8%
55.7%
46
319
Iowa
January-47
41.1%
1.6%
0.8%
1.4%
1.6%
53.5%
66
320
Minnesota
March-96
25.9%
1.5%
0.8%
1.1%
0.4%
70.3%
66
321
Florida
November-99
54.3%
4.4%
0.7%
6.9%
1.2%
32.5%
42
323
California
June-98
53.7%
1.0%
0.4%
3.9%
2.4%
38.6%
54
325
Texas
April-03
29.0%
1.0%
1.1%
1.3%
1.9%
65.7%
35
330
Ohio
March-96
46.8%
1.6%
0.3%
2.1%
1.2%
48.1%
43
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 15

Table 6

Telephone Number Utilization by Area Code as of June 30, 2010

Area Code State/Jurisdiction
Area Code Opened
Assigned
Intermediate
Reserved
Aging
Admin
Available
OCNs
331
Illinois
October-07
42.3%
2.1%
2.5%
4.2%
0.9%
48.0%
22
334
Alabama
January-95
31.8%
3.1%
0.3%
1.9%
1.8%
61.0%
62
336
North Carolina
December-97
50.2%
4.1%
0.5%
3.0%
1.1%
41.1%
57
337
Louisiana
October-99
36.4%
3.0%
0.4%
2.0%
2.2%
56.0%
41
339
Massachusetts
May-01
41.3%
2.7%
0.8%
1.3%
0.9%
53.0%
20
340
Virgin Islands
June-97
46.8%
4.3%
8.2%
13.2%
0.6%
27.0%
5
347
New York
October-99
71.6%
3.6%
0.3%
5.4%
0.7%
18.5%
38
351
Massachusetts
May-01
26.0%
0.0%
0.1%
2.5%
0.1%
71.4%
1
352
Florida
December-95
47.7%
2.2%
0.1%
3.6%
1.3%
45.1%
42
360
Washington
January-95
51.7%
1.0%
0.9%
2.4%
1.7%
42.3%
63
361
Texas
February-99
26.1%
2.2%
0.1%
1.4%
1.4%
68.8%
35
385
Utah
March-09
57.2%
5.5%
0.2%
1.2%
1.3%
34.7%
5
386
Florida
February-01
45.5%
5.0%
0.2%
2.7%
1.2%
45.4%
39
401
Rhode Island
January-47
59.5%
0.5%
0.9%
2.0%
0.5%
36.7%
29
402
Nebraska
January-47
42.8%
0.7%
0.4%
1.2%
0.9%
54.0%
58
404
Georgia
January-47
61.8%
5.8%
0.6%
3.2%
3.3%
25.3%
39
405
Oklahoma
January-47
47.9%
3.8%
0.2%
2.2%
1.0%
44.9%
42
406
Montana
January-47
27.1%
0.5%
1.4%
0.9%
1.0%
69.1%
49
407
Florida
April-88
54.0%
4.2%
0.6%
4.6%
1.5%
35.2%
42
408
California
January-59
58.6%
2.5%
0.3%
2.1%
1.6%
34.7%
50
409
Texas
November-82
32.7%
5.6%
0.2%
2.0%
1.4%
58.1%
39
410
Maryland
October-91
59.5%
0.3%
1.0%
2.1%
0.9%
36.2%
41
412
Pennsylvania
January-47
50.1%
0.4%
1.3%
2.7%
1.0%
44.5%
36
413
Massachusetts
January-47
55.9%
1.1%
1.3%
1.8%
0.5%
39.4%
37
414
Wisconsin
January-47
57.4%
1.8%
0.2%
2.7%
1.5%
36.4%
31
415
California
January-47
54.6%
2.2%
0.7%
2.4%
1.5%
38.7%
52
417
Missouri
January-50
30.8%
2.8%
0.3%
1.5%
0.9%
63.6%
51
419
Ohio
January-47
36.1%
5.0%
0.4%
1.9%
1.6%
55.0%
67
423
Tennessee
September-95
46.8%
2.9%
0.5%
3.0%
1.2%
45.6%
54
424
California
August-06
43.5%
6.0%
1.7%
3.6%
0.5%
44.8%
42
425
Washington
April-97
61.3%
3.1%
0.4%
2.2%
2.6%
30.4%
38
430
Texas
February-03
11.5%
40.2%
8.0%
0.2%
3.5%
36.7%
13
432
Texas
April-03
33.5%
3.1%
0.4%
1.6%
1.5%
59.8%
26
434
Virginia
June-01
47.7%
1.3%
0.8%
3.4%
0.8%
46.0%
35
435
Utah
September-97
31.5%
1.4%
1.2%
1.2%
1.4%
63.3%
55
440
Ohio
August-97
49.2%
1.6%
0.4%
2.0%
0.7%
46.0%
42
442
California
November-09
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0
443
Maryland
June-97
52.7%
0.5%
0.4%
3.7%
0.4%
42.5%
44
469
Texas
July-99
55.1%
0.8%
1.1%
2.7%
1.1%
39.3%
47
470
Georgia
February-10
41.6%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
58.4%
3
475
Connecticut
December-09
3.6%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.3%
96.2%
3
478
Georgia
August-00
40.8%
2.4%
0.2%
2.7%
1.2%
52.7%
45
479
Arkansas
January-02
41.6%
2.8%
0.4%
1.5%
1.2%
52.4%
39
480
Arizona
March-99
73.1%
1.5%
0.9%
3.8%
1.5%
19.2%
34
484
Pennsylvania
June-99
42.0%
1.0%
2.2%
2.2%
0.2%
52.4%
51
501
Arkansas
January-47
46.2%
3.3%
0.3%
1.8%
2.7%
45.7%
35
502
Kentucky
January-47
47.2%
5.2%
0.5%
2.8%
2.5%
41.8%
34
503
Oregon
January-47
60.4%
1.3%
0.8%
2.7%
1.9%
33.0%
56
504
Louisiana
January-47
48.2%
4.3%
0.3%
4.4%
3.5%
39.4%
31
505
New Mexico
January-47
60.1%
0.4%
1.7%
3.3%
2.0%
32.5%
37
507
Minnesota
January-54
22.6%
0.9%
2.2%
0.8%
0.6%
72.9%
86
508
Massachusetts
July-88
59.4%
0.5%
1.8%
2.3%
1.0%
35.0%
41
509
Washington
January-57
50.6%
0.8%
1.6%
2.5%
1.5%
43.1%
54
510
California
September-91
50.3%
2.7%
0.4%
2.5%
2.0%
42.0%
43
512
Texas
January-47
60.0%
3.1%
0.6%
2.6%
2.1%
31.6%
46
513
Ohio
January-47
59.1%
0.7%
0.3%
2.8%
1.3%
35.8%
34
515
Iowa
January-47
51.0%
1.2%
1.8%
1.3%
1.4%
43.3%
56
516
New York
January-51
58.2%
0.2%
0.6%
2.3%
0.9%
37.7%
40
517
Michigan
January-47
37.5%
0.4%
0.5%
1.5%
1.1%
59.0%
61
518
New York
January-47
49.0%
1.5%
1.1%
2.4%
0.9%
45.3%
48
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 16

Table 6

Telephone Number Utilization by Area Code as of June 30, 2010

Area Code State/Jurisdiction
Area Code Opened
Assigned
Intermediate
Reserved
Aging
Admin
Available
OCNs
520
Arizona
March-95
58.3%
0.6%
1.0%
3.1%
1.4%
35.7%
42
530
California
November-97
37.3%
7.1%
0.2%
1.5%
1.5%
52.4%
55
534
Wisconsin
August-10
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
90.0%
10.0%
1
540
Virginia
July-95
51.9%
0.8%
0.7%
2.5%
1.0%
43.2%
54
541
Oregon
November-95
39.9%
0.9%
2.4%
1.8%
1.2%
53.8%
58
551
New Jersey
December-01
76.2%
0.7%
0.6%
3.0%
0.4%
19.2%
18
559
California
November-98
43.6%
4.9%
0.2%
2.5%
2.5%
46.4%
40
561
Florida
May-96
57.6%
5.4%
0.7%
4.9%
2.4%
29.1%
40
562
California
January-97
49.7%
0.9%
0.5%
2.9%
3.6%
42.4%
53
563
Iowa
March-01
36.4%
1.4%
0.6%
1.7%
0.7%
59.2%
57
567
Ohio
January-02
20.3%
4.2%
0.1%
1.0%
0.3%
74.1%
35
570
Pennsylvania
December-98
43.3%
1.3%
2.8%
2.3%
0.8%
49.6%
53
571
Virginia
March-00
67.9%
1.7%
0.5%
3.2%
0.7%
26.0%
39
573
Missouri
January-96
32.1%
1.3%
0.4%
1.5%
0.5%
64.1%
46
574
Indiana
January-02
41.4%
2.4%
0.4%
1.5%
1.2%
53.2%
41
575
New Mexico
October-07
32.4%
1.1%
1.6%
1.8%
0.9%
62.2%
46
580
Oklahoma
November-97
18.7%
2.5%
0.2%
0.9%
0.9%
76.8%
48
585
New York
November-01
51.5%
1.3%
2.9%
1.7%
0.5%
42.1%
38
586
Michigan
September-01
43.7%
0.5%
0.4%
2.0%
0.6%
52.8%
38
601
Mississippi
January-47
32.1%
2.6%
0.4%
1.8%
2.5%
60.5%
46
602
Arizona
January-47
63.8%
0.4%
0.6%
3.9%
1.3%
30.1%
32
603
New Hampshire
January-47
45.8%
0.2%
3.1%
2.4%
0.8%
47.8%
49
605
South Dakota
January-47
24.8%
0.5%
0.7%
1.0%
0.9%
72.1%
80
606
Kentucky
January-55
28.0%
1.4%
0.6%
1.5%
2.9%
65.6%
42
607
New York
January-54
39.6%
1.5%
0.5%
1.3%
0.4%
56.7%
33
608
Wisconsin
January-55
40.8%
0.7%
1.3%
1.3%
1.4%
54.5%
74
609
New Jersey
January-57
54.7%
0.5%
0.5%
1.9%
0.6%
41.8%
44
610
Pennsylvania
January-94
56.9%
0.1%
2.7%
1.7%
0.7%
37.9%
55
612
Minnesota
January-47
65.0%
0.9%
0.4%
2.1%
1.8%
29.8%
42
614
Ohio
January-47
57.2%
1.4%
0.5%
2.9%
2.0%
36.0%
38
615
Tennessee
January-54
55.0%
5.0%
0.7%
3.5%
2.6%
33.2%
44
616
Michigan
January-47
49.4%
0.7%
0.6%
1.8%
0.9%
46.6%
44
617
Massachusetts
January-47
62.8%
0.3%
1.7%
2.6%
1.0%
31.7%
39
618
Illinois
January-47
33.1%
0.7%
0.7%
1.3%
1.4%
62.8%
54
619
California
January-82
55.2%
2.3%
0.4%
2.9%
2.4%
36.8%
51
620
Kansas
February-01
18.7%
3.1%
0.8%
0.9%
0.4%
76.0%
62
623
Arizona
March-99
71.8%
0.8%
1.1%
4.5%
2.4%
19.3%
32
626
California
June-97
53.1%
1.7%
0.5%
2.7%
2.4%
39.6%
54
630
Illinois
August-96
50.8%
1.2%
1.3%
2.2%
1.0%
43.5%
35
631
New York
November-99
52.5%
0.1%
0.5%
2.8%
0.5%
43.6%
39
636
Missouri
May-99
41.2%
1.5%
0.8%
1.9%
0.4%
54.2%
32
641
Iowa
July-00
27.3%
1.3%
0.4%
0.9%
0.4%
69.7%
66
646
New York
July-99
78.5%
1.8%
0.6%
4.3%
0.7%
14.1%
40
650
California
August-97
47.4%
3.3%
0.4%
2.0%
1.3%
45.5%
45
651
Minnesota
July-98
66.7%
0.2%
0.6%
2.2%
1.4%
28.8%
47
657
California
September-08
29.3%
9.0%
4.3%
0.7%
0.5%
56.2%
23
660
Missouri
October-97
15.1%
1.2%
0.6%
1.0%
0.3%
81.8%
48
661
California
February-99
47.9%
3.4%
0.3%
2.4%
2.6%
43.5%
54
662
Mississippi
April-99
26.8%
2.6%
0.5%
1.5%
1.2%
67.2%
50
670
Northern Mariana Isl.July-97
21.6%
0.0%
10.8%
0.4%
0.0%
67.2%
3
671
Guam
July-97
33.2%
0.0%
0.3%
2.1%
0.2%
64.1%
8
678
Georgia
January-98
53.6%
3.4%
1.3%
5.5%
1.6%
34.6%
51
681
West Virginia
March-09
3.9%
0.0%
0.3%
1.4%
0.1%
94.3%
8
682
Texas
October-00
51.2%
1.9%
0.5%
2.7%
2.2%
41.6%
34
684
American Samoa
October-04
68.7%
0.0%
1.9%
1.1%
2.0%
26.3%
1
701
North Dakota
January-47
21.5%
0.6%
0.6%
0.5%
1.4%
75.5%
65
702
Nevada
January-47
64.2%
3.3%
0.4%
5.2%
0.9%
26.1%
38
703
Virginia
January-47
69.6%
0.1%
0.6%
2.5%
0.6%
26.6%
43
704
North Carolina
January-47
54.7%
5.1%
0.5%
3.1%
2.2%
34.3%
45
706
Georgia
May-92
44.4%
3.0%
0.6%
2.3%
1.8%
47.9%
78
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 17

Table 6

Telephone Number Utilization by Area Code as of June 30, 2010

Area Code State/Jurisdiction
Area Code Opened
Assigned
Intermediate
Reserved
Aging
Admin
Available
OCNs
707
California
January-59
44.2%
3.8%
1.0%
1.7%
1.9%
47.4%
48
708
Illinois
November-89
42.6%
0.7%
1.8%
2.4%
0.9%
51.8%
35
712
Iowa
January-47
18.6%
1.3%
2.4%
1.1%
0.5%
76.2%
105
713
Texas
January-47
59.3%
2.7%
0.4%
2.3%
1.2%
34.1%
41
714
California
January-51
56.9%
1.3%
0.4%
3.1%
2.7%
35.6%
55
715
Wisconsin
January-47
28.2%
1.0%
0.6%
0.9%
0.8%
68.6%
91
716
New York
January-47
53.1%
1.5%
1.2%
2.7%
0.9%
40.7%
35
717
Pennsylvania
January-47
56.4%
0.9%
1.2%
1.9%
0.9%
38.7%
45
718
New York
September-84
62.6%
0.1%
1.0%
3.2%
1.4%
31.6%
36
719
Colorado
March-88
49.9%
0.3%
1.3%
3.1%
1.6%
43.8%
54
720
Colorado
June-98
74.0%
1.3%
0.6%
3.9%
1.6%
18.6%
33
724
Pennsylvania
February-98
38.0%
1.2%
0.6%
2.3%
0.6%
57.3%
55
727
Florida
July-98
59.4%
0.1%
0.9%
3.4%
3.0%
33.2%
39
731
Tennessee
February-01
29.2%
2.7%
2.2%
2.6%
1.6%
61.6%
37
732
New Jersey
June-97
55.0%
0.5%
0.7%
2.3%
0.7%
40.8%
41
734
Michigan
December-97
46.4%
0.6%
0.6%
1.7%
0.7%
50.0%
51
740
Ohio
December-97
35.9%
2.4%
0.2%
1.7%
1.1%
58.8%
49
747
California
May-09
10.3%
2.8%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
86.8%
4
754
Florida
August-01
64.4%
1.2%
0.1%
2.5%
1.3%
30.5%
13
757
Virginia
July-96
64.2%
0.4%
0.8%
2.9%
0.7%
30.9%
30
760
California
March-97
49.5%
3.3%
0.9%
2.8%
2.9%
40.7%
67
762
Georgia
May-06
9.3%
4.2%
0.0%
0.5%
0.0%
85.8%
15
763
Minnesota
February-00
61.3%
0.1%
0.7%
2.2%
1.3%
34.4%
52
765
Indiana
February-97
31.5%
1.8%
0.2%
1.4%
1.0%
64.0%
58
769
Mississippi
March-05
20.5%
1.1%
0.1%
1.7%
1.5%
75.1%
19
770
Georgia
August-95
52.9%
9.0%
0.3%
3.2%
2.5%
32.1%
43
772
Florida
February-02
51.2%
4.5%
0.4%
3.5%
3.2%
37.3%
37
773
Illinois
October-96
53.1%
1.0%
0.8%
4.5%
0.8%
39.8%
35
774
Massachusetts
May-01
34.9%
1.6%
0.8%
2.2%
0.6%
59.9%
34
775
Nevada
December-98
40.8%
4.5%
0.3%
1.6%
1.7%
51.1%
48
779
Illinois
March-07
35.9%
0.6%
7.3%
4.2%
0.3%
51.6%
21
781
Massachusetts
September-97
47.4%
0.3%
0.9%
2.5%
0.5%
48.4%
38
785
Kansas
July-97
23.0%
3.4%
0.3%
0.9%
0.9%
71.5%
59
786
Florida
March-98
67.6%
1.3%
0.8%
6.1%
1.2%
23.0%
38
787
Puerto Rico
March-96
59.6%
0.7%
0.7%
2.6%
1.1%
35.2%
14
801
Utah
January-47
69.0%
0.8%
0.9%
2.8%
1.9%
24.6%
32
802
Vermont
January-47
42.2%
0.3%
2.0%
1.1%
0.9%
53.4%
36
803
South Carolina
January-47
47.5%
5.3%
0.7%
2.5%
2.3%
41.7%
57
804
Virginia
June-73
60.2%
0.7%
1.3%
3.4%
1.0%
33.4%
33
805
California
January-57
48.1%
1.8%
0.5%
1.9%
2.6%
45.1%
61
806
Texas
January-57
25.6%
2.4%
0.2%
1.3%
1.6%
68.8%
47
808
Hawaii
January-57
56.6%
0.3%
0.4%
3.0%
3.7%
36.1%
15
810
Michigan
December-93
37.2%
0.5%
0.8%
1.8%
2.0%
57.7%
40
812
Indiana
January-47
37.3%
1.3%
0.6%
2.1%
1.6%
57.1%
56
813
Florida
January-53
61.2%
0.1%
0.9%
3.4%
2.5%
32.0%
40
814
Pennsylvania
January-47
42.4%
1.2%
0.4%
1.3%
0.8%
53.9%
48
815
Illinois
January-47
41.2%
1.1%
0.6%
1.4%
1.2%
54.5%
63
816
Missouri
January-47
48.0%
2.8%
0.4%
2.5%
1.2%
45.0%
46
817
Texas
January-53
50.8%
1.4%
0.5%
2.3%
2.7%
42.2%
50
818
California
January-84
55.6%
1.7%
0.5%
3.0%
2.1%
37.1%
53
828
North Carolina
March-98
43.6%
3.0%
0.6%
2.4%
2.3%
48.1%
44
830
Texas
July-97
21.6%
1.2%
0.2%
1.1%
0.8%
75.1%
47
831
California
July-98
39.8%
7.3%
0.3%
1.6%
2.1%
49.0%
41
832
Texas
January-99
62.4%
0.8%
0.6%
4.3%
1.1%
30.6%
41
843
South Carolina
March-98
45.0%
3.0%
0.3%
2.8%
2.3%
46.5%
50
845
New York
June-00
45.8%
0.8%
0.6%
2.7%
0.7%
49.4%
51
847
Illinois
January-96
58.0%
0.8%
1.5%
2.0%
0.9%
36.8%
37
848
New Jersey
December-01
48.0%
0.5%
0.1%
2.7%
0.5%
48.2%
23
850
Florida
June-97
39.8%
4.0%
0.2%
3.6%
1.1%
51.3%
53
856
New Jersey
June-99
47.0%
0.6%
0.5%
2.3%
0.6%
49.2%
42
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 18

Table 6

Telephone Number Utilization by Area Code as of June 30, 2010

Area Code State/Jurisdiction
Area Code Opened
Assigned
Intermediate
Reserved
Aging
Admin
Available
OCNs
857
Massachusetts
May-01
47.4%
0.3%
0.2%
3.1%
1.0%
48.1%
30
858
California
June-99
54.7%
2.8%
0.6%
2.9%
2.3%
36.7%
43
859
Kentucky
April-00
43.9%
1.7%
0.7%
1.8%
1.6%
50.2%
41
860
Connecticut
August-95
49.9%
1.6%
0.5%
1.9%
1.1%
45.1%
34
862
New Jersey
December-01
54.8%
1.3%
1.0%
3.5%
0.9%
38.4%
34
863
Florida
September-99
41.0%
0.4%
0.6%
3.0%
2.1%
52.9%
37
864
South Carolina
December-95
48.1%
4.3%
0.8%
3.4%
1.7%
41.7%
41
865
Tennessee
November-99
53.1%
5.5%
1.1%
2.8%
2.3%
35.3%
35
870
Arkansas
April-97
25.7%
2.5%
0.3%
1.1%
0.5%
69.7%
44
872
Illinois
November-09
37.7%
21.2%
0.0%
1.3%
0.0%
39.8%
7
901
Tennessee
January-47
60.7%
4.3%
0.8%
4.4%
3.0%
26.9%
32
903
Texas
November-90
36.4%
4.2%
1.2%
2.3%
2.3%
53.6%
59
904
Florida
July-65
54.2%
5.4%
0.6%
3.9%
2.6%
33.3%
41
906
Michigan
March-61
18.2%
0.6%
0.8%
0.5%
0.2%
79.8%
25
907
Alaska
January-57
26.3%
1.4%
0.5%
1.6%
0.8%
69.4%
41
908
New Jersey
November-90
46.2%
0.5%
0.5%
2.0%
1.1%
49.8%
45
909
California
November-92
56.5%
2.2%
0.7%
3.2%
3.1%
34.4%
54
910
North Carolina
November-93
44.8%
2.6%
1.5%
3.3%
1.5%
46.3%
44
912
Georgia
January-54
38.6%
2.8%
0.4%
2.6%
3.1%
52.5%
53
913
Kansas
January-47
53.4%
1.8%
0.3%
2.6%
1.7%
40.2%
43
914
New York
January-47
52.2%
0.2%
0.8%
2.3%
0.9%
43.7%
41
915
Texas
January-47
57.5%
2.0%
0.2%
3.8%
6.0%
30.5%
28
916
California
January-47
57.4%
1.8%
0.4%
2.9%
2.3%
35.2%
51
917
New York
January-92
57.6%
0.4%
0.3%
1.6%
0.3%
39.8%
33
918
Oklahoma
January-53
38.8%
3.2%
0.3%
1.7%
1.1%
54.9%
64
919
North Carolina
January-54
56.0%
4.4%
2.1%
2.9%
2.1%
32.6%
41
920
Wisconsin
July-97
35.1%
1.5%
0.9%
1.3%
1.2%
60.1%
66
925
California
March-98
44.0%
3.4%
0.6%
2.1%
2.3%
47.5%
43
928
Arizona
June-01
40.6%
3.4%
2.2%
1.9%
0.9%
51.0%
54
931
Tennessee
September-97
39.2%
2.2%
0.8%
1.8%
0.9%
55.1%
48
936
Texas
February-00
29.7%
1.8%
0.3%
1.9%
0.7%
65.7%
38
937
Ohio
September-96
42.0%
2.4%
0.3%
1.7%
0.8%
52.8%
45
938
Alabama
July-10
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
100.0%
1
939
Puerto Rico
September-01
42.7%
1.2%
2.2%
2.7%
0.9%
50.3%
9
940
Texas
May-97
28.7%
2.1%
0.2%
1.7%
4.1%
63.2%
56
941
Florida
May-95
52.1%
0.2%
0.8%
5.1%
2.1%
39.8%
42
947
Michigan
September-02
89.1%
3.5%
0.0%
0.0%
0.1%
7.2%
6
949
California
April-98
58.4%
2.2%
0.5%
2.8%
2.2%
33.9%
52
951
California
July-04
63.0%
2.1%
0.7%
3.6%
3.2%
27.4%
49
952
Minnesota
February-00
57.2%
0.2%
0.4%
2.0%
1.2%
39.1%
48
954
Florida
September-95
56.5%
6.1%
0.7%
4.4%
2.6%
29.7%
41
956
Texas
July-97
46.1%
3.1%
0.1%
3.4%
2.9%
44.4%
30
970
Colorado
April-95
42.7%
1.1%
1.5%
2.2%
1.5%
51.1%
64
971
Oregon
October-00
54.3%
1.9%
3.7%
3.2%
0.9%
35.9%
30
972
Texas
September-96
53.2%
1.6%
0.6%
2.2%
2.1%
40.1%
49
973
New Jersey
June-97
56.0%
0.3%
0.9%
2.7%
0.8%
39.3%
47
978
Massachusetts
September-97
48.0%
0.7%
1.6%
2.7%
0.6%
46.5%
41
979
Texas
February-00
27.7%
1.4%
0.4%
1.3%
1.8%
67.3%
40
980
North Carolina
April-01
55.9%
1.2%
1.8%
1.9%
2.3%
36.8%
24
985
Louisiana
February-01
37.0%
3.0%
0.7%
3.6%
2.3%
53.4%
35
989
Michigan
April-01
27.6%
0.7%
0.8%
1.0%
1.2%
68.7%
52
Source: Numbering Resource Utilization/Forecast Reports data filed with NeuStar, Inc. as of October 13, 2010. Area code information is from
NeuStar, Inc.'s website.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 19

Table 7

Assigned, Aging, and Available Telephone Numbers by Area Code as of June 30, 2010

(in thousands except OCNs)
Wireline (Incumbent LECs and CLECs)
Mobile Wireless
Area Code
Assigned
Aging
Available
OCNs
Assigned
Aging
Available
OCNs
201
2,539
131
1,769
39
1,610
55
522
7
202
3,234
83
718
32
1,246
77
194
7
203
2,590
107
2,113
27
1,704
75
330
8
205
1,621
81
1,700
30
1,594
115
657
11
206
2,221
92
1,204
32
1,452
50
102
6
207
1,445
88
2,568
46
1,126
33
576
9
208
1,711
74
2,202
47
1,280
55
742
16
209
1,401
49
1,746
31
1,261
59
494
9
210
2,034
82
990
26
1,695
110
236
8
212
5,616
173
1,581
25
66
3
9
7
213
1,150
95
947
40
656
52
473
7
214
2,360
102
1,369
39
2,491
116
182
7
215
3,296
118
1,711
32
1,405
57
327
8
216
1,391
79
1,226
25
1,032
83
340
8
217
1,005
28
3,368
36
1,026
39
524
10
218
683
27
3,060
60
603
19
825
8
219
665
24
1,104
22
680
37
298
9
224
383
14
438
25
557
37
209
8
225
835
76
778
25
778
37
401
9
228
358
21
875
19
368
20
336
9
229
628
35
1,689
28
687
53
1,247
10
231
562
21
1,794
29
562
23
572
11
234
47
2
168
20
52
3
73
4
239
952
101
614
16
784
38
456
8
240
1,192
97
1,185
35
1,260
78
344
9
248
1,970
125
2,356
34
1,529
37
306
7
251
649
31
1,129
31
698
37
488
9
252
1,166
115
2,051
23
955
68
642
12
253
1,411
84
1,148
31
946
49
138
6
254
649
57
1,831
28
702
39
544
11
256
1,252
73
1,788
30
1,708
171
1,163
10
260
670
21
1,123
24
588
19
516
8
262
1,204
49
1,828
29
796
28
320
11
267
1,153
128
2,061
36
1,291
89
702
8
269
709
34
1,289
34
665
33
586
14
270
1,262
70
3,350
37
978
40
917
11
276
364
44
948
25
367
20
287
14
281
2,598
172
2,474
33
1,486
71
162
7
301
3,212
121
1,998
35
1,302
41
243
10
302
1,822
61
1,377
27
870
41
215
8
303
3,632
171
1,610
27
1,449
40
62
8
304
1,357
36
2,627
25
1,520
77
688
14
305
2,518
181
1,057
29
1,386
73
144
7
307
554
25
1,273
29
542
48
968
14
308
247
16
1,937
40
317
10
678
12
309
933
41
3,350
43
826
33
356
10
310
3,076
139
1,323
34
1,930
87
302
7
312
2,738
99
1,256
28
970
42
449
8
313
1,402
103
1,378
32
1,464
71
697
7
314
1,981
99
1,271
19
1,603
72
286
8
315
1,397
56
3,026
36
1,313
48
321
7
316
574
22
892
16
632
25
100
10
317
2,002
98
1,968
32
1,584
83
151
8
318
1,015
56
1,974
31
1,096
57
1,145
11
319
1,146
36
1,956
57
646
25
349
7
320
557
29
2,197
54
418
14
436
10
321
882
98
597
29
833
45
286
8
323
1,792
120
1,588
39
1,811
144
697
7
325
369
13
1,101
21
361
20
274
12
330
1,766
78
2,401
31
1,792
83
645
10
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 20

Table 7

Assigned, Aging, and Available Telephone Numbers by Area Code as of June 30, 2010

(in thousands except OCNs)
Wireline (Incumbent LECs and CLECs)
Mobile Wireless
Area Code
Assigned
Aging
Available
OCNs
Assigned
Aging
Available
OCNs
331
38
3
51
16
70
8
71
6
334
939
53
2,178
44
1,006
66
1,296
14
336
1,815
114
1,924
44
1,574
87
556
11
337
843
56
1,490
29
898
39
985
9
339
71
3
172
15
114
3
67
5
340
52
41
32
1
117
7
65
4
347
1,254
65
427
31
3,251
273
737
7
351
0
0
0
0
3
0
7
1
352
1,107
99
1,217
27
1,100
67
634
10
360
2,179
102
2,388
51
1,492
66
439
8
361
556
20
1,289
24
672
44
680
8
385
32
1
16
3
14
0
11
2
386
638
39
761
28
639
37
382
8
401
2,160
61
1,458
18
944
41
257
8
402
1,849
41
3,172
44
1,295
46
711
12
404
2,013
112
790
28
2,211
103
325
8
405
1,458
56
1,951
26
1,385
70
445
14
406
902
37
3,345
39
851
24
1,123
10
407
1,984
198
1,499
29
1,555
93
348
8
408
2,711
102
1,585
36
1,572
54
341
7
409
513
22
1,058
25
588
45
302
9
410
3,471
128
1,840
31
1,176
34
162
6
412
1,837
122
2,120
26
1,298
48
334
7
413
1,774
46
1,466
27
740
34
178
7
414
1,274
47
890
18
1,017
62
210
9
415
2,401
115
1,930
39
1,322
51
181
7
417
781
46
2,677
39
840
35
611
9
419
1,332
71
2,814
53
1,310
70
784
12
423
1,205
85
1,707
39
1,419
81
622
13
424
258
17
280
35
164
17
156
7
425
2,029
70
1,311
30
983
37
94
6
430
6
0
33
7
7
1
17
5
432
294
11
991
16
414
22
254
8
434
697
55
934
21
626
41
285
11
435
585
25
1,528
38
584
21
761
15
440
1,401
64
1,839
31
1,230
45
340
9
442
0
0
24
1
0
0
0
0
443
1,640
142
2,066
33
1,859
103
750
8
469
700
25
853
39
742
45
165
7
470
8
0
3
2
0
0
9
1
475
1
0
9
1
0
0
18
2
478
586
36
829
28
605
43
628
13
479
667
21
1,252
26
727
30
437
8
480
2,157
109
789
23
1,387
78
112
8
484
1,465
82
2,718
40
978
47
328
10
501
1,203
39
1,481
24
986
46
538
8
502
1,138
69
1,473
24
1,191
68
405
8
503
2,798
126
2,097
47
1,827
78
153
7
504
1,123
133
951
21
1,017
63
422
7
505
1,450
69
925
22
1,260
81
339
12
507
715
27
3,688
73
627
19
603
11
508
3,084
130
2,156
31
1,382
42
262
7
509
1,675
82
1,792
40
1,241
60
646
11
510
1,923
104
1,677
30
1,459
64
507
7
512
2,402
85
1,490
35
1,641
91
262
8
513
2,026
82
1,448
24
1,582
90
335
8
515
1,513
34
1,580
44
742
25
305
9
516
1,830
88
1,253
30
1,571
49
491
7
517
952
39
1,953
47
809
32
496
12
518
1,535
90
2,027
38
1,214
43
281
6
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 21

Table 7

Assigned, Aging, and Available Telephone Numbers by Area Code as of June 30, 2010

(in thousands except OCNs)
Wireline (Incumbent LECs and CLECs)
Mobile Wireless
Area Code
Assigned
Aging
Available
OCNs
Assigned
Aging
Available
OCNs
520
1,477
58
998
28
1,137
81
358
9
530
1,310
55
2,516
43
999
38
417
8
534
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
540
1,516
59
1,535
40
1,406
78
755
11
541
1,489
73
2,885
45
1,310
52
778
10
551
31
0
12
12
175
8
40
6
559
1,187
62
1,984
29
1,303
79
231
7
561
1,651
160
782
28
1,221
56
291
7
562
1,379
83
1,357
38
1,304
72
472
7
563
594
30
1,387
49
413
16
227
7
567
92
3
799
25
180
10
195
10
570
1,428
94
2,435
38
1,386
47
674
13
571
514
17
317
30
832
47
179
7
573
824
47
2,755
33
930
35
650
10
574
639
19
1,005
29
592
25
510
9
575
533
23
1,606
31
555
38
483
14
580
525
23
3,553
33
660
34
1,281
13
585
1,259
35
1,531
29
1,046
40
172
7
586
791
51
963
29
850
24
514
7
601
1,132
76
3,054
31
1,223
58
1,177
12
602
2,397
145
865
20
1,542
93
430
8
603
2,148
140
2,675
35
1,173
35
653
10
605
758
39
3,405
69
712
18
877
10
606
746
36
2,252
28
709
42
1,154
13
607
725
25
1,731
26
655
21
220
6
608
1,093
36
1,853
57
1,019
32
774
14
609
1,876
65
1,767
32
1,504
55
553
8
610
2,999
96
2,197
41
1,327
29
225
9
612
1,278
38
786
33
1,395
49
160
7
614
2,138
110
1,658
29
1,529
73
216
7
615
1,984
155
1,720
32
1,753
85
195
9
616
1,012
38
1,122
29
877
32
307
12
617
3,418
158
1,962
30
1,453
42
283
6
618
849
35
3,047
38
1,117
43
515
13
619
1,660
83
1,151
38
1,744
98
440
7
620
550
31
3,141
48
452
19
935
12
623
855
55
280
21
596
37
79
8
626
1,481
80
1,293
39
1,368
65
335
7
630
2,375
124
1,859
25
1,542
48
1,134
7
631
1,986
124
2,291
29
1,268
50
234
7
636
890
46
1,473
21
433
15
195
8
641
878
22
2,518
55
365
17
656
10
646
2,037
98
362
33
2,337
144
422
7
650
1,930
86
2,186
32
884
30
199
7
651
1,629
53
872
38
837
28
87
7
657
37
0
47
18
4
1
33
5
660
278
28
2,727
36
317
12
493
12
661
1,175
50
1,410
39
1,103
64
257
8
662
814
55
2,762
38
845
40
1,377
10
670
18
0
125
1
39
1
50
2
671
93
11
337
4
143
4
119
4
678
2,001
295
2,022
38
1,982
116
523
10
681
1
1
55
7
2
0
18
1
682
175
5
295
26
270
19
47
7
684
0
0
0
0
27
0
11
1
701
639
15
3,362
54
631
13
1,100
10
702
2,194
218
1,210
27
1,881
113
256
8
703
3,900
156
1,598
34
1,536
38
119
6
704
2,433
141
1,858
34
1,811
103
406
9
706
1,701
80
2,053
55
1,587
88
1,318
17
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 22

Table 7

Assigned, Aging, and Available Telephone Numbers by Area Code as of June 30, 2010

(in thousands except OCNs)
Wireline (Incumbent LECs and CLECs)
Mobile Wireless
Area Code
Assigned
Aging
Available
OCNs
Assigned
Aging
Available
OCNs
707
1,693
70
2,322
35
1,129
41
346
8
708
1,545
96
1,901
24
1,199
57
873
8
712
449
27
2,832
90
421
23
741
15
713
3,039
110
1,696
30
1,449
61
25
7
714
2,355
150
1,514
39
2,098
93
480
7
715
956
28
2,656
71
895
30
1,771
16
716
1,406
85
1,541
27
1,273
51
304
7
717
2,026
61
2,023
34
1,644
60
307
7
718
3,785
195
2,264
28
912
47
110
7
719
1,306
93
1,493
37
932
47
337
12
720
1,330
63
566
22
1,533
88
137
8
724
1,313
115
3,329
43
1,249
41
397
9
727
1,489
90
940
26
1,089
46
290
8
731
389
40
1,302
26
503
39
468
8
732
2,770
129
2,229
31
1,446
49
317
7
734
1,357
63
2,321
41
1,257
31
260
8
740
1,095
47
2,509
34
1,125
55
826
13
747
2
0
17
4
0
0
0
0
754
58
1
16
9
108
5
63
4
757
2,309
104
1,102
19
1,770
77
547
7
760
1,975
103
1,997
47
1,704
101
494
12
762
13
0
72
9
13
1
160
6
763
1,105
41
802
42
531
17
86
8
765
937
44
2,678
44
899
39
873
11
769
14
1
117
12
71
6
193
7
770
2,782
207
1,690
28
1,309
39
143
11
772
586
41
396
25
438
21
254
8
773
1,873
159
1,609
24
2,163
183
1,043
8
774
301
26
857
26
525
25
559
7
775
810
28
1,423
33
628
29
339
12
779
11
1
57
15
48
6
29
6
781
2,662
158
2,820
29
783
24
382
6
785
701
32
3,211
45
591
21
786
11
786
682
77
422
28
1,421
92
287
7
787
1,535
13
1,952
7
2,846
181
595
6
801
3,358
133
1,457
23
1,821
77
146
7
802
1,765
48
2,553
24
487
13
283
9
803
1,615
69
1,653
44
1,423
92
694
12
804
1,859
123
1,162
22
1,341
58
356
7
805
1,852
72
1,969
44
1,368
57
537
9
806
596
22
2,766
33
737
43
798
12
808
1,538
86
1,249
8
1,280
63
203
6
810
637
38
1,491
30
786
29
421
8
812
1,155
87
2,538
41
1,159
45
890
11
813
2,066
112
1,037
28
1,360
72
419
8
814
1,314
37
2,555
31
1,116
32
458
14
815
1,564
46
3,195
49
1,354
51
436
11
816
1,401
82
2,064
32
1,269
55
211
10
817
2,185
112
2,668
40
1,715
64
140
7
818
2,380
134
1,489
38
1,815
90
442
7
828
1,056
67
1,591
33
1,025
50
565
9
830
466
16
1,514
33
422
30
416
9
831
735
30
1,264
29
609
25
168
7
832
932
37
1,182
31
2,426
196
368
7
843
1,594
94
2,136
39
1,420
92
793
10
845
1,467
105
2,106
41
1,018
41
376
8
847
3,182
122
2,026
27
1,351
32
517
7
848
25
0
49
16
124
8
100
7
850
1,269
155
2,293
36
1,302
76
852
12
856
1,521
68
1,854
31
775
44
223
8
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 23

Table 7

Assigned, Aging, and Available Telephone Numbers by Area Code as of June 30, 2010

(in thousands except OCNs)
Wireline (Incumbent LECs and CLECs)
Mobile Wireless
Area Code
Assigned
Aging
Available
OCNs
Assigned
Aging
Available
OCNs
857
192
10
294
23
327
23
234
7
858
1,422
89
1,085
31
602
18
112
7
859
1,054
36
1,747
27
955
48
458
12
860
2,089
78
2,604
23
1,552
61
357
8
862
134
7
146
27
389
27
221
7
863
720
54
922
24
648
44
651
9
864
1,320
110
1,521
32
1,249
72
468
8
865
883
51
845
25
960
47
174
8
870
718
31
3,053
34
894
41
1,203
8
872
24
0
3
4
3
1
25
3
901
1,314
100
673
22
1,268
86
136
8
903
1,143
61
2,418
42
1,272
93
942
11
904
1,573
121
1,077
27
1,332
72
431
9
906
245
8
1,451
19
234
6
651
6
907
928
49
3,118
29
626
46
975
13
908
1,433
78
2,147
35
1,272
37
614
7
909
1,697
90
839
39
1,573
92
434
7
910
1,359
113
1,864
32
1,372
88
796
9
912
777
50
1,274
37
899
64
921
13
913
1,079
54
1,138
30
826
39
151
9
914
1,685
83
1,425
31
1,043
37
570
7
915
627
29
492
17
725
61
147
9
916
2,176
124
1,542
39
1,593
65
307
7
917
841
20
212
23
2,911
83
545
7
918
1,380
52
2,857
49
1,296
65
802
13
919
2,320
113
1,590
30
1,729
93
463
9
920
1,163
40
2,033
43
1,073
42
1,301
18
925
1,525
84
1,944
30
884
33
286
7
928
872
33
1,490
37
795
48
633
12
931
624
33
1,694
35
959
42
372
10
936
503
16
1,229
26
471
46
237
8
937
1,375
45
2,462
33
1,266
60
471
10
938
0
0
20
1
0
0
0
0
939
7
0
129
3
302
19
235
6
940
471
33
1,688
41
484
22
387
12
941
975
69
645
28
709
32
444
9
947
2
0
10
5
586
0
37
1
949
1,770
98
1,097
38
957
32
149
7
951
1,266
74
705
37
1,364
76
335
7
952
1,305
48
970
39
388
11
60
7
954
2,146
177
1,073
30
1,598
80
279
7
956
842
36
837
19
1,212
115
691
8
970
1,298
71
1,951
45
1,001
45
732
14
971
169
9
204
23
243
15
69
7
972
3,198
141
2,481
39
814
27
102
7
973
3,021
151
2,248
37
1,392
61
336
7
978
2,411
162
2,875
31
1,103
36
308
7
979
476
16
1,115
26
429
27
405
9
980
157
1
98
16
194
11
133
8
985
581
89
1,107
25
648
32
561
8
989
769
24
2,530
36
819
33
1,013
14
Source: Numbering Resource Utilization/Forecast Reports data filed with NeuStar, Inc. as of October 13, 2010.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 24

Table 8

Pooled Thousands-blocks as of June 30, 2010

Incumbent LECs and CLECs
Mobile Wireless
Pooled Thousands- Total Thousands- Percent of total blocks Pooled Thousands-
Total Thousands-
Percent of total blocks
State
blocks
blocks reported1
that are pooled
blocks
blocks reported1
that are pooled
Alabama
1,238
11,031
11.22
2,189
8,989
24.35
Alaska
1
1,002
0.10
43
611
7.04
Arizona
1,909
12,279
15.55
2,562
7,504
34.14
Arkansas
735
5,946
12.36
796
4,291
18.55
California
16,369
96,652
16.94
17,689
47,815
36.99
Colorado
2,013
12,989
15.50
1,785
6,332
28.19
Connecticut
1,552
10,213
15.20
1,534
4,293
35.73
Delaware
663
3,375
19.64
461
1,187
38.84
District of Columbia
555
4,205
13.20
730
1,562
46.73
Florida
7,577
41,284
18.35
8,214
25,668
32.00
Georgia
2,791
21,349
13.07
3,586
13,828
25.93
Guam
0
0
NM
0
0
NM
Hawaii
170
2,998
5.67
471
1,568
30.04
Idaho
446
3,368
13.24
511
2,000
25.55
Illinois
7,910
37,329
21.19
5,623
19,607
28.68
Indiana
2,231
15,798
14.12
2,063
8,684
23.76
Iowa
982
7,234
13.57
981
4,860
20.19
Kansas
954
7,865
12.13
1,146
4,189
27.36
Kentucky
1,072
11,549
9.28
1,382
6,460
21.39
Louisiana
1,405
10,733
13.09
2,131
7,365
28.93
Maine
682
3,194
21.35
561
1,906
29.43
Maryland
2,816
17,501
16.09
2,891
7,725
37.42
Massachusetts
5,033
28,426
17.71
3,208
9,451
33.94
Michigan
5,046
28,796
17.52
5,098
16,529
30.84
Minnesota
2,050
14,198
14.44
1,648
7,354
22.41
Mississippi
922
7,969
11.57
896
4,826
18.57
Missouri
2,416
17,587
13.74
2,191
8,379
26.15
Montana
338
2,072
16.31
178
1,378
12.92
Nebraska
467
4,084
11.43
507
2,844
17.83
Nevada
896
5,829
15.37
1,420
3,238
43.85
New Hampshire
857
5,088
16.84
553
2,072
26.69
New Jersey
5,263
26,997
19.49
4,200
12,541
33.49
New Mexico
461
3,449
13.37
923
2,529
36.50
New York
9,902
50,518
19.60
12,115
26,486
45.74
North Carolina
3,488
22,174
15.73
3,675
13,127
28.00
North Dakota
90
1,339
6.72
127
872
14.56
Northern Marianas
0
0
NM
0
0
NM
Ohio
4,505
30,653
14.70
4,418
16,448
26.86
Oklahoma
1,099
8,681
12.66
1,487
5,799
25.64
Oregon
1,398
9,057
15.44
1,516
4,809
31.52
Pennsylvania
7,193
40,031
17.97
6,225
16,466
37.81
Puerto Rico
251
3,539
7.09
1,076
4,261
25.25
Rhode Island
405
3,786
10.70
416
1,308
31.80
South Carolina
1,602
9,289
17.25
1,757
6,432
27.32
South Dakota
127
1,488
8.53
179
1,284
13.94
Tennessee
2,410
14,214
16.96
3,041
9,291
32.73
Texas
8,234
57,889
14.22
12,973
32,502
39.91
Utah
1,521
6,333
24.02
975
3,227
30.21
Vermont
446
3,875
11.51
327
854
38.29
Virgin Islands
0
0
NM
0
0
NM
Virginia
3,348
18,657
17.95
3,919
11,116
35.26
Washington
2,227
18,163
12.26
2,539
8,251
30.77
West Virginia
641
3,403
18.84
659
2,597
25.38
Wisconsin
1,704
12,473
13.66
1,495
8,716
17.15
Wyoming
181
1,162
15.58
87
844
10.31
ota s
Totals
128,592
799,113
16.09
137,177
432,275
31.73
Source: Pooling data provided by NeuStar, Inc.
1 Includes only those thousands-blocks in rate centers with pooling.
NM - Not meaningful.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 25

Table 9

Increased Utilization and Telephone Numbers Saved due to Thousands-Block Pooling

as of June 30, 2010
Numbers

Numbers Needed
Utilization had
Increased Utilization
Numbers
Assigned
Total
Percent
had Whole NXXs
Whole NXXs
of Thousands-blocks
Saved Due
Carrier Type
OCNs
to End-users1
Numbers1
Utilized
Been Issued
Been Issued
due to Pooling
to Pooling
Incumbent LEC
272
8,183,976
12,861,000
63.6%
51,090,000
16.0%
47.6%
38,229,000
Mobile Wireless
537 102,674,243 135,998,000
75.5%
211,800,000
48.5%
27.0%
75,802,000
CLEC
1,400 53,411,146 107,944,000
49.5%
477,380,000
11.2%
38.3%
369,436,000
Total
2,209 164,279,322 256,815,000
64.0%
740,290,000
22.2%
41.8%
483,475,000
1 Includes only those telephone numbers in pooled blocks on which carriers reported utilization data.
Source: Numbering Resource Utilization/Forecast Reports data filed with NeuStar, Inc. as of October 13, 2010.
NeuStar also provided data on thousands-block pooling.

Table 10

Number Utilization for Specialized Non-geographic Area Codes

as of June 30, 2010
Assigned
Intermediate
Reserved
Aging
Admin
Available1
Total
Unique
Specialized
(Thousands of telephone numbers)
NXXs
Area Codes
4,688
1,237
983
627
5
369
7,910
791
500
59.3%
15.6%
12.4%
7.9%
0.1%
4.7%
100.0%
359
10
1
1
0
519
890
88
900
40.3%
1.1%
0.1%
0.2%
0.0%
58.3%
100.0%
1 Includes only those telephone numbers in blocks on which carriers reported utilization data.
Source: Numbering Resource Utilization/Forecast Reports data filed with NeuStar, Inc. as of October 13, 2010.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 26

Chart 1

Incumbent LECs: Average Utilization Rates by Number of

Thousands-Blocks Held in a Rate Center

100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
Number of thousands-blocks held in a single rate center
Note: number of thousands-blocks has
been rounded to the nearest ten.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 27

Chart 2

Mobile Wireless: Average Utilization Rates by

Number of Thousands-Blocks Held in a Rate Center

100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
Number of thousands-blocks held in a single rate center
Note: number of thousands-blocks has
been rounded to the nearest ten.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 28

Chart 3

CLECs: Average Utilization Rates by Number of

Thousands-Blocks Held in a Rate Center

100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
Number of thousands-blocks held in a single rate center
Note: number of thousands-blocks has
been rounded to the nearest ten.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 29

Chart 4

Paging Carriers: Average Utilization Rates by Number of

Thousands-Blocks Held in a Rate Center

100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
Number of thousands-blocks held in a single rate center
Note: number of thousands-blocks has
been rounded to the nearest ten.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 30

Table 11

Alternate Sources of NPA-NXX Assignments1

NPA-NXXs that appear in
NRUF
NANPA
LERG
NXXs
All Three Databases
NRUF, NANPA and LERG
140,374
Two of the Three Databases
NRUF and NANPA
1,813
NANPA and LERG
2,122
NRUF and LERG
81
Only One Database
NRUF
357
NANPA
383
LERG
264
Total NXXs in Database.
142,625
144,692
142,841
Sources: NANPA's NPA-NXX assignments database as of July 1, 2010; the LERG, as of
July 1, 2010; NRUF June 30, 2010 database (NRUF forms filed as of October 13, 2010).
1 Includes only telephone numbers in NXXs assigned to carriers and therefore available for
assignment to customers. Does not include any numbers in NXXs that have not yet been
assigned to carriers.

Table 12

Utilization over Time

Carrier Type
ILEC
Mobile Wireless
CLEC
Paging
Overall
December 2000
52.1%
46.2%
9.8%
26.3%
40.1%
June 2001
52.1%
45.3%
10.9%
24.8%
39.6%
December 2001
52.5%
47.2%
11.4%
20.2%
39.7%
June 2002
52.2%
47.5%
10.4%
17.6%
39.2%
December 2002
52.2%
47.8%
10.6%
17.0%
39.2%
June 2003
53.2%
49.0%
10.7%
14.3%
39.9%
December 2003
52.6%
50.6%
10.6%
13.0%
39.5%
June 2004
54.5%
53.9%
14.8%
10.9%
42.3%
December 2004
53.5%
54.6%
16.4%
10.3%
42.2%
June 2005
52.8%
56.9%
18.1%
9.9%
43.0%
December 2005
52.4%
59.1%
19.7%
8.6%
43.4%
June 2006
50.2%
60.4%
20.5%
8.1%
43.3%
December 2006
49.3%
63.3%
21.5%
8.0%
44.2%
June 2007
50.8%
64.8%
25.4%
7.5%
46.7%
December 2007
50.7%
65.0%
26.9%
7.1%
47.1%
June 2008
50.3%
65.3%
30.4%
6.6%
48.1%
December 2008
49.6%
65.6%
31.1%
6.7%
47.9%
June 2009
48.8%
66.1%
34.3%
6.1%
48.5%
December 2009
47.3%
66.7%
34.0%
5.9%
47.9%
June 2010
47.1%
66.8%
33.3%
5.3%
47.9%
Source: Numbering Resource Utilization/Forecast Reports filed with NeuStar, Inc.
Note: Starting with June 2006 data, where an RBOC has acquired a carrier with CLEC services in
the RBOC's operating region, the numbering resources of the acquired CLEC that are in the
RBOC's operating region are counted as incumbent LEC resources. Where the acquired CLEC
provides services outside of the acquirer's operating region, the numbering resources are treated as
CLEC resources.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 31

Table 13


NPA-NXX Assignments, Returns, and Net Assignments


Quarter
NPA-NXXs Assigned NPA-NXXs Returned
Net Assignments
2003 Q41
539
244
295
2004 Q1
888
182
706
2004 Q2
728
323
405
2004 Q3
748
160
588
2004 Q4
761
319
442
2005 Q1
1,113
249
864
2005 Q2
778
330
448
2005 Q3
716
246
470
2005 Q4
705
203
502
2006 Q1
1,165
194
971
2006 Q2
944
175
769
2006 Q3
883
137
746
2006 Q4
987
188
799
2007 Q1
1,117
170
947
2007 Q2
768
195
573
2007 Q3
747
173
574
2007 Q4
584
211
373
2008 Q1
720
166
554
2008 Q2
804
96
708
2008 Q3
699
149
550
2008 Q4
723
343
380
2009 Q1
675
189
486
2009 Q2
495
115
380
2009 Q3
402
82
320
2009 Q4
572
148
424
2010 Q1
879
80
799
2010 Q2
578
67
511
2010 Q3
676
77
599
1 Data for prior periods can be found in the "Data as of June 30, 2009" edition of this
report, which can be found at: http://www.fcc.gov/wcb/iatd/number.html.
Source: http://www.nanpa.com/reports/reports_cocodes_actStatus.html.

Chart 5

NPA-NXX Assignments, Returns, and Net Assignments

1,200
1,000
800
600
400
200
0
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
2004 Q
2004 Q
2005 Q
2005 Q
2005 Q
2005 Q
2006 Q
2006 Q
2006 Q
2006 Q
2007 Q
2007 Q
2007 Q
2007 Q
2008 Q
2008 Q
2008 Q
2008 Q
2009 Q
2009 Q
2009 Q
2009 Q
2010 Q
2010 Q
2010 Q
Assignments
Returns
Net Assignments
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 32

Table 14

Telephone Number Porting Activity Since Wireless Porting Started1

(in thousands)
Wireline to
Wireline to
Wireless to
Wireless to
Year
Quarter
Wireline
Wireless
Wireless2
Wireline
Total
2003
Fourth
1,199
14
817
2
2,032
2004
First
2,296
168
1,936
4
4,404
Second
2,263
287
2,175
4
4,729
Third
2,143
281
2,417
4
4,845
Fourth
2,327
314
2,384
4
5,029
2005
First
2,891
208
2,358
5
5,462
Second
2,915
149
2,812
4
5,880
Third
3,323
135
2,750
6
6,213
Fourth
3,093
88
2,723
6
5,911
2006
First
4,011
78
2,562
9
6,659
Second
3,318
95
2,422
6
5,840
Third
3,012
152
2,658
5
5,828
Fourth
2,933
114
2,628
7
5,683
2007
First
2,801
117
3,225
6
6,149
Second
2,925
160
3,290
8
6,382
Third
3,963
363
3,283
11
7,619
Fourth
5,340
257
3,489
7
9,093
2008
First
3,987
63
3,266
10
7,326
Second
3,828
62
3,169
8
7,067
Third
3,907
134
4,006
12
8,059
Fourth
3,696
134
3,983
13
7,827
2009
First
3,601
118
4,010
14
7,743
Second
3,844
113
3,802
14
7,773
Third
3,973
215
4,134
15
8,337
Fourth
3,812
181
3,961
16
7,969
2010
First
4,048
97
3,797
13
7,954
Second
4,308
89
3,757
14
8,167
Third
4,553
103
4,696
50
9,403
Cumulative Total
94,309
4,289
86,509
275
185,382
1 These figures include numbers that were ported back to the original carrier, or where the subscriber with the ported
number terminated service.
2 Excludes significant porting activity between Cingular and AT&T Wireless following the closing of their merger in
October 2004.
Source: Raw data from Local Number Portability Administrator (NeuStar, Inc.). Rollups performed by the Industry
Analysis and Technology Division staff, Wireline Competition Bureau.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 33

Table 15

Telephone Numbers Remaining in the Porting Database at the End of Each Quarter1

(in thousands)
Wireline to
Wireline to
Wireless to
Wireless to
Total
Year
Quarter
Wireline
Wireless
Wireless2
Wireless2
2003
Fourth3
25,869
16
795
2
26,682
2004
First
28,462
173
2,686
3
31,324
Second
28,371
406
4,635
4
33,417
Third
29,396
667
6,874
9
36,945
Fourth
30,607
832
9,041
11
41,491
2005
First
32,399
1,001
10,860
16
44,276
Second
34,169
1,092
12,956
19
48,236
Third
36,013
1,201
14,804
23
52,041
Fourth
37,608
1,246
16,101
29
54,983
2006
First
40,194
1,272
17,577
34
59,077
Second
42,130
1,333
19,032
42
62,538
Third
43,743
1,407
20,509
46
65,705
Fourth
45,149
1,480
21,920
50
68,600
2007
First
46,761
1,541
23,518
50
71,870
Second
48,396
1,659
25,399
54
75,508
Third4
50,222
2,057
27,068
116
79,463
Fourth
53,168
2,031
29,065
120
84,384
2008
First
55,095
2,075
30,605
127
87,902
Second
56,114
2,067
32,024
153
90,359
Third
57,217
2,175
34,089
156
93,637
Fourth
58,924
2,255
35,851
171
97,202
2009
First
60,609
2,353
37,663
177
100,801
Second
62,508
2,433
39,221
182
104,344
Third
64,333
2,539
40,522
181
107,576
Fourth
66,136
2,654
41,776
184
110,750
2010
First
67,517
2,701
43,425
186
113,829
Second
69,627
2,651
44,591
200
117,069
Third
71,923
2,673
46,371
201
121,168
1 Numbers ported because customer changed carriers. The database contains the date when the telephone number record was
last updated. For most telephone numbers, this was the most recent port. For those telephone numbers affected by area code
changes, however, the date refers to when the record was updated to reflect the new area code. See the text for a fuller
discussion.
2 Excludes significant porting activity between Cingular and AT&T Wireless following the closing of their merger.
3 Data from prior periods can be found in the "Data as of June 30, 2009" edition of this report, which can be found at:
http://www.fcc.gov/wcb/iatd/number.html.
4 Starting with the July 2007 data, the method of determining whether a port came from a wireline or wireless carrier changed.
For numbers that have been ported multiple times, the original carrier is now used to determine the porting carrier's type.
Previously, the porting carrier's type was based on the most recent port. This was done to better estimate the number of phone
numbers used in wireline and wireless service.
Source: Raw data from Local Number Portability Administrator (NeuStar, Inc.). Rollups performed by the Industry Analysis
and Technology Division staff, Wireline Competition Bureau.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 34

Table 16

Numbers in the Porting Database by Quarter in Which They Were Most Recently Ported1

as of September 30, 20102
(in thousands)
Ported During
Wireline to
Wireline to
Wireless to
Wireless to
Year
Quarter
Wireline
Wireless
Wireless
Wireline
2003
Fourth3
817
6
264
2
2004
First
1,179
69
588
2
Second
1,136
71
669
7
Third
1,179
123
810
8
Fourth
1,107
89
816
3
2005
First
1,327
67
810
4
Second
1,397
60
881
3
Third
1,622
69
1,018
3
Fourth
1,426
52
1,036
4
2006
First
2,130
41
1,018
4
Second
1,686
52
1,059
6
Third
1,475
95
1,230
4
Fourth
1,461
78
1,268
5
2007
First
1,581
70
1,246
5
Second
1,784
106
1,289
4
Third
2,205
186
1,590
16
Fourth
3,210
169
1,753
9
2008
First
2,480
56
1,753
9
Second
2,549
59
1,742
10
Third
2,631
103
2,467
7
Fourth
2,632
101
2,517
5
2009
First
2,682
112
2,409
7
Second
2,929
110
2,435
6
Third
3,165
198
2,850
7
Fourth
3,181
184
2,956
7
2010
First
3,475
110
2,981
9
Second
3,853
106
2,982
9
Third
4,258
129
3,934
11
1 The vast majority of these numbers are ported because customer changed carriers.
2 The local number portability database was designed solely for the purpose of routing calls. As such, it retains only the most
recent porting activity for any given number. So if a consumer ports a number from Carrier A to Carrier B, and later the
consumer then ports the number from Carrier B to Carrier C, the database will not reflect the original port from Carrier A to
Carrier B. Also, numbers that revert back to the original carrier (either because the customer ports the number back to the
original carrier or because the customer discontinues service with that number) are dropped from the database. Lastly, area
code splits can make a number appear to be ported later than it actually was. Starting with the July 2007 edition of this report,
the methodology for determining whether a number was ported away from a wireline or a wireless carrier changed. Rather than
relying on the carrier type of the most recent port, the numbers now reflect the original carrier type, based on the carrier that is
assigned the thousands block of the donated number.
3 Data from prior periods can be found in the "Data as of June 30, 2009" edition of this report, which can be found at:
http://www.fcc.gov/wcb/iatd/number.html.
Source: Raw data from Local Number Portability Administrator (NeuStar, Inc.). Rollups performed by the Industry Analysis
and Technology Division staff, Wireline Competition Bureau.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 35

Table 17

Ports Between Carrier Types as of September 30, 2010

(in thousands)

Wireline

Wireline

Wireless

Wireless

State

to Wireline
to Wireless
to Wireless
to Wireline

Total

Alabama
649
58
548
1
1,256
Alaska
161
4
323
1
488
Arizona
1,635
32
930
4
2,600
Arkansas
252
120
169
**
542
California
10,512
157
5,643
34
16,346
Colorado
1,322
43
899
4
2,268
Connecticut
1,032
22
529
3
1,585
Delaware
381
3
110
1
494
District of Columbia
504
5
209
2
721
Florida
4,186
127
3,219
13
7,545
Georgia
1,982
107
1,377
12
3,477
Guam
6
0
21
0
27
Hawaii
226
5
235
1
467
Idaho
158
17
193
**
369
Illinois
3,320
90
2,167
10
5,587
Indiana
951
66
796
4
1,818
Iowa
354
15
333
**
703
Kansas
588
235
354
2
1,179
Kentucky
497
62
492
2
1,054
Louisiana
621
17
525
2
1,166
Maine
371
22
137
1
531
Maryland
1,379
20
987
4
2,390
Massachusetts
2,970
49
1,150
4
4,172
Michigan
2,525
79
1,977
7
4,589
Minnesota
1,604
43
1,043
5
2,695
Mississippi
230
27
254
**
511
Missouri
914
78
784
2
1,778
Montana
108
8
76
**
193
Nebraska
312
35
195
**
543
Nevada
739
11
363
2
1,114
New Hampshire
472
13
185
1
670
New Jersey
2,363
32
1,334
7
3,737
New Mexico
196
15
204
1
415
New York
6,200
104
3,426
14
9,744
North Carolina
1,595
91
1,117
4
2,806
North Dakota
84
6
60
**
150
Northern Mariana Isl.
0
*
*
*
2
Ohio
2,158
89
1,695
9
3,952
Oklahoma
561
38
525
1
1,125
Oregon
844
39
567
2
1,453
Pennsylvania
3,206
48
1,940
6
5,201
Puerto Rico
56
77
560
**
693
Rhode Island
301
6
173
1
480
South Carolina
692
42
474
1
1,210
South Dakota
122
6
65
**
194
Tennessee
1,184
39
786
3
2,012
Texas
4,842
299
3,330
13
8,484
Utah
891
24
446
1
1,363
Vermont
138
4
55
**
197
Virgin Islands
0
*
3
*
3
Virginia
1,778
39
1,155
6
2,979
Washington
2,358
49
1,079
6
3,493
West Virginia
250
5
262
**
519
Wisconsin
1,100
43
857
3
2,004
Wyoming
39
5
32
**
77
Unduplicated total
71,923
2,673
46,371
201
121,168
* Indicates that the number has been withheld to protect carrier confidentiality.
** Indicates a number between 1 and 499.
1 Starting with the July 2007 report, the method of determining whether a port came from a wireline or wireless
carrier changed. For numbers ported multiple times, the original carrier is now used to determine the porting
carrier's type. Previously, the porting carrier's type was based on the most recent port. This is done to better
estimate the number of phone numbers used in wireline and wireless service.
Source: Raw data from Local Number Portability Administrator (NeuStar, Inc.). Rollups performed by the
Industry Analysis and Technology Division staff, Wireline Competition Bureau.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 36

Table 18

Number of Carriers Porting or Receiving Ports as of September 30, 2010

Wireline to
Wireline to
Wireless to
Wireless to
Wireline Ports
Wireless Ports
Wireless Ports
Wireline Ports
Carriers
Carriers
Carriers
Carriers
Carriers
Carriers
Carriers
Carriers
State
Porting
Receiving
Porting
Receiving
Porting
Receiving
Porting
Receiving
Alabama
37
41
33
12
15
13
10
23
Alaska
8
10
8
8
6
7
6
7
Arizona
33
31
28
11
11
14
8
21
Arkansas
22
22
16
7
8
9
8
18
California
54
61
54
15
15
16
11
49
Colorado
37
38
38
14
15
16
10
29
Connecticut
21
30
17
9
7
8
6
18
Delaware
27
30
15
8
7
9
7
18
District of Columbia
27
29
15
7
6
8
6
19
Florida
66
79
51
11
10
12
9
49
Georgia
59
74
54
14
15
13
12
42
Guam
4
4
0
0
5
5
0
0
Hawaii
8
9
8
7
6
7
6
8
Idaho
25
30
22
12
15
13
11
16
Illinois
61
64
50
15
14
15
11
38
Indiana
50
57
45
15
12
15
9
32
Iowa
92
69
63
12
15
13
13
19
Kansas
36
41
41
16
18
18
11
25
Kentucky
42
53
29
17
15
17
11
25
Louisiana
37
36
24
11
9
11
8
21
Maine
25
31
23
7
6
7
6
19
Maryland
41
42
29
10
8
11
7
27
Massachusetts
36
38
30
9
7
8
7
28
Michigan
57
62
55
16
13
15
11
43
Minnesota
72
78
65
11
9
12
8
38
Mississippi
35
34
22
11
10
12
8
15
Missouri
38
42
28
13
12
12
9
26
Montana
17
19
17
6
8
6
4
9
Nebraska
28
27
36
10
15
13
10
13
Nevada
30
31
20
11
10
11
9
23
New Hampshire
21
24
19
8
7
8
6
19
New Jersey
44
39
32
9
7
9
7
29
New Mexico
24
25
17
11
13
13
10
9
New York
67
72
62
11
8
11
8
51
North Carolina
44
51
35
13
13
13
11
31
North Dakota
19
19
25
8
7
9
4
9
Northern Mariana Isl.
0
0
1
1
3
4
1
1
Ohio
55
63
55
16
14
15
13
42
Oklahoma
28
31
27
13
19
17
11
21
Oregon
45
48
40
12
9
12
7
31
Pennsylvania
52
60
43
13
16
17
8
42
Puerto Rico
5
5
5
7
6
8
6
4
Rhode Island
16
19
10
7
6
7
5
14
South Carolina
39
51
35
8
12
10
9
32
South Dakota
21
21
20
5
6
9
5
8
Tennessee
51
52
47
12
12
14
11
37
Texas
78
84
74
29
25
30
16
52
Utah
23
23
26
10
12
14
8
18
Vermont
15
17
10
6
6
6
4
10
Virgin Islands
0
0
1
2
4
5
2
1
Virginia
44
50
34
11
11
11
10
28
Washington
41
50
33
11
10
11
9
37
West Virginia
19
24
11
9
9
11
8
11
Wisconsin
46
48
55
15
13
15
13
25
Wyoming
12
15
11
8
13
12
7
7
Unduplicated total
913
917
809
115
143
131
86
456
1 Starting with the July 2007 report, the method of determining whether a port came from a wireline or wireless carrier changed. For numbers
ported multiple times, the original carrier is now used to determine the porting carrier's type. Previously, the porting carrier's type was based
on the most recent port. This is done to better estimate the number of phone numbers employed in wireline and wireless service.
Source: Raw data from Local Number Portability Administrator (NeuStar, Inc.). Rollups performed by the Industry Analysis
and Technology Division staff, Wireline Competition Bureau.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 37

Table 19

Percentage of Numbers Ported as of June 30, 2010

Wireline
Wireline
Wireless
Wireless
Total
Total
Wireline
Assigned
Percent
Wireless
Assigned
Percent
Total
Assigned
Percent
Ports
Numbers
Ported
Ports
Numbers
Ported
Ports
Numbers
Ported
State
(thousands)
(%)
(thousands)
(%)
(thousands)
(%)
Alabama
695
4,461
15.6
507
5,006
10.1
1,202
9,467
12.7
Alaska
175
928
18.9
310
626
49.5
485
1,553
31.2
American Samoa
0
0
NA
0
27
0.0
0
27
0.0
Arizona
1,623
7,757
20.9
914
5,456
16.7
2,537
13,213
19.2
Arkansas
365
2,588
14.1
168
2,607
6.4
533
5,194
10.3
California
10,364
45,719
22.7
5,499
34,578
15.9
15,863
80,297
19.8
Colorado
1,332
7,567
17.6
886
4,915
18.0
2,219
12,481
17.8
Connecticut
1,023
4,680
21.9
510
3,256
15.7
1,533
7,936
19.3
Delaware
372
1,822
20.4
106
870
12.2
479
2,692
17.8
District of Columbia
496
3,234
15.3
202
1,246
16.2
698
4,481
15.6
Florida
4,081
21,295
19.2
3,129
17,523
17.9
7,210
38,818
18.6
Georgia
1,997
10,508
19.0
1,334
9,292
14.4
3,330
19,800
16.8
Guam
5
93
5.7
20
143
13.9
25
237
10.6
Hawaii
221
1,538
14.3
228
1,280
17.8
448
2,819
15.9
Idaho
163
1,711
9.5
189
1,280
14.8
352
2,991
11.8
Illinois
3,305
16,519
20.0
2,093
12,225
17.1
5,398
28,745
18.8
Indiana
986
6,069
16.3
800
5,502
14.5
1,786
11,571
15.4
Iowa
340
4,580
7.4
321
2,587
12.4
661
7,167
9.2
Kansas
796
2,903
27.4
353
2,502
14.1
1,149
5,405
21.3
Kentucky
543
4,199
12.9
474
3,833
12.4
1,018
8,032
12.7
Louisiana
634
4,397
14.4
503
4,437
11.3
1,138
8,834
12.9
Maine
380
1,445
26.3
135
1,126
12.0
515
2,570
20.0
Maryland
1,309
9,515
13.8
950
5,598
17.0
2,259
15,113
14.9
Massachusetts
2,924
13,914
21.0
1,120
6,431
17.4
4,044
20,344
19.9
Michigan
2,531
10,407
24.3
1,913
10,439
18.3
4,444
20,846
21.3
Minnesota
1,608
7,272
22.1
1,017
4,799
21.2
2,625
12,070
21.7
Mississippi
247
2,318
10.6
242
2,507
9.7
489
4,825
10.1
Missouri
968
6,154
15.7
751
5,391
13.9
1,719
11,544
14.9
Montana
113
902
12.6
75
851
8.8
188
1,754
10.7
Nebraska
332
2,096
15.9
199
1,612
12.3
531
3,709
14.3
Nevada
738
3,004
24.6
353
2,509
14.1
1,091
5,513
19.8
New Hampshire
476
2,148
22.2
180
1,173
15.3
656
3,321
19.8
New Jersey
2,286
13,349
17.1
1,291
8,687
14.9
3,576
22,037
16.2
New Mexico
205
1,983
10.4
199
1,815
11.0
405
3,798
10.7
New York
6,100
26,823
22.7
3,306
19,878
16.6
9,406
46,701
20.1
North Carolina
1,632
10,307
15.8
1,075
8,659
12.4
2,707
18,966
14.3
North Dakota
89
639
13.9
58
631
9.2
146
1,270
11.5
Northern Mariana Isl.
*
18
0.0
1
39
3.2
1
56
2.2
Ohio
2,194
12,663
17.3
1,641
11,098
14.8
3,835
23,761
16.1
Oklahoma
588
3,363
17.5
499
3,341
14.9
1,087
6,704
16.2
Oregon
850
4,456
19.1
555
3,380
16.4
1,405
7,836
17.9
Pennsylvania
3,162
16,830
18.8
1,881
11,694
16.1
5,044
28,525
17.7
Puerto Rico
118
1,543
7.7
497
3,148
15.8
615
4,691
13.1
Rhode Island
302
2,160
14.0
167
944
17.7
469
3,104
15.1
South Carolina
719
4,529
15.9
454
4,093
11.1
1,173
8,622
13.6
South Dakota
126
758
16.7
64
712
8.9
190
1,470
12.9
Tennessee
1,196
6,399
18.7
760
6,862
11.1
1,956
13,262
14.7
Texas
4,924
27,134
18.1
3,222
23,225
13.9
8,146
50,359
16.2
Utah
897
3,974
22.6
436
2,420
18.0
1,332
6,394
20.8
Vermont
140
1,765
7.9
54
487
11.0
194
2,252
8.6
Virgin Islands
*
52
0.0
1
117
1.3
1
169
0.9
Virginia
1,738
11,159
15.6
1,122
7,877
14.2
2,860
19,036
15.0
Washington
2,320
9,515
24.4
1,058
6,113
17.3
3,378
15,628
21.6
West Virginia
244
1,358
18.0
255
1,522
16.8
499
2,880
17.3
Wisconsin
1,113
5,691
19.6
831
4,799
17.3
1,944
10,490
18.5
Wyoming
43
554
7.7
31
542
5.8
74
1,096
6.7
Total
72,130
378,766
19.0
44,939
293,710
15.3
117,069
672,476
17.4
NA Not applicable. Number portability is not available in American Samoa or Northern Mariana Islands
* Indicates a number between 1 and 499.
1Because the latest available NRUF data are as of June 30, 2010, porting data of the same vintage are used. Unlike in Tables 17 and 18,
in this table the carrier type is that of the carrier porting the number. This is done to provide a measure of the likelihood that a number
currently employed in either service will be ported.
Source: Raw data from Local Number Portability Administrator (NeuStar, Inc.) and Numbering Resource Utilization/Forecast Reports
filed with NeuStar, Inc. as of October 13, 2010. Rollups performed by the Industry Analysis and Technology Division staff, Wireline
Competition Bureau.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 38

Table 20

Telephone Numbers Assigned for Toll-Free Service1

Total Spare
Toll-Free
Working
Miscellaneous
Toll-Free
Numbers
Toll-Free
Toll-Free
Numbers
Still
Year
Month
Numbers
Numbers2
Assigned
Available
1993
December
3,155,955
731,438
3,887,393
3,822,607
1994
December
4,948,605
763,235
5,711,840
1,998,160
1995
December
6,700,576
286,487
6,987,063
722,937
1996
December
9,527,982
945,671
10,473,653
5,216,347
1997
December
12,980,714
996,449
13,977,163
1,712,837
1998
December
16,200,883
965,466
17,166,349
6,503,651
1999
December
19,677,001
1,101,964
20,778,965
2,891,035
2000
December
23,022,015
1,178,096
24,200,111
7,449,889
2001
December
23,453,029
1,027,973
24,481,002
7,168,998
2002
December
22,496,215
1,051,232
23,547,447
8,102,553
2003
December
21,108,662
941,520
22,050,182
9,599,818
2004
December
22,159,440
1,145,661
23,305,101
8,344,899
2005
December
22,474,643
957,835
23,432,478
8,217,522
2006
December
22,709,753
756,808
23,466,561
8,183,439
2007
December
23,902,1133
585,864
24,487,982
7,322,018
2008
December
24,556,244
773,164
25,329,408
6,480,592
2009
December
26,035,821
488,248
26,524,069
5,285,931
2010
September
28,619,416
492,435
29,111,851
2,698,205
1 Toll-free (800) service was initially offered by AT&T in 1967. On May 1, 1993, procedures for routing toll- free
calls were changed and 800 numbers were made "portable" so customers who switched service providers could retain
their numbers. Due to the growth in demand for toll-free numbers, a new toll-free calling code, 888, was added in
March 1996, which made it possible to assign about 8 million new toll-free numbers. A third toll-free calling code,
877, was added in April 1998; and a fourth toll-free code, 866, was added in July 2000.
2 Miscellaneous numbers include those in the 800, 888, 877, and 866 service management systems maintained by
Database Service Management, Inc., and categorized as reserved, assigned but not yet activated, recently
disconnected, or suspended.
3 On February 15, 2008, SMS800 freed up all unused numbers contained in certain blocks of numbers that were
reserved for the provision of certain mobile radio telecommunications (pager) services within a specified geographic
area. These numbers were in NPA 800 and had NXXs in the range of NX2 where ‘N’ = 2 through 9 and ‘X’ = 0 or 1
and the numbers ended in a state code. See,
http://www.sms800.com/PublicContent.aspx?Text=2008&URL=Shared+Documents%2fPublic%2fNews%2f2008&;
Site=Public, visited Jul 1, 2011.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 39

Table 21

Telephone Numbers Assigned for 800 Toll-Free Service1

Total Spare
Toll-Free
Working
Miscellaneous
Toll-Free
Numbers
Toll-Free
Toll-Free
Numbers
Still
Year
Month
Numbers
Numbers2
Assigned
Available
2000
September
7,572,091
137,705
7,709,796
204
December
7,566,810
132,887
7,699,697
10,303
2001
March
7,434,621
264,967
7,699,588
10,412
June
7,357,279
242,106
7,599,385
110,615
September
7,383,111
164,881
7,547,992
162,008
December
7,370,055
184,689
7,554,744
155,256
2002
March
7,181,636
400,955
7,582,591
127,409
June
7,234,847
282,005
7,516,852
193,148
September
7,200,821
177,723
7,378,544
331,456
December
7,210,159
203,268
7,413,427
296,573
2003
March
7,182,120
224,536
7,406,656
303,344
June
7,171,068
234,576
7,405,644
304,356
September
7,031,806
222,846
7,254,652
455,348
December
7,089,752
260,807
7,350,559
359,441
2004
March
7,187,381
234,719
7,422,100
287,900
June
7,181,216
187,107
7,368,323
341,677
September
7,262,915
197,252
7,460,167
249,833
December
7,332,085
208,368
7,540,453
169,547
2005
March
7,267,936
234,679
7,502,615
207,385
June
7,163,402
425,206
7,588,608
121,392
September
7,160,678
495,326
7,656,004
53,996
December
7,317,165
277,052
7,594,217
115,783
2006
March
7,416,046
197,083
7,613,129
96,871
June
7,330,416
317,525
7,647,941
62,059
September
7,419,137
279,471
7,698,608
11,392
December
7,445,535
207,672
7,653,207
56,793
2007
March
7,559,307
140,686
7,699,993
10,007
June
7,546,532
153,063
7,699,595
10,405
September
7,597,883
102,117
7,700,000
10,000
December
7,736,774
123,226
7,860,000
10,000
2008
March
7,731,2843
128,716
7,860,000 10,0003
June
7,686,736
173,264
7,860,000 10,0003
September
7,755,279
104,721
7,860,000 10,0003
December
7,731,430
128,570
7,860,000 10,0003
2009
March
7,752,946
107,054
7,860,000 10,0003
June
7,775,315
84,685
7,860,000 10,0003
September
7,780,198
79,802
7,860,000 10,0003
December
7,793,883
66,117
7,860,000 10,0003
2010
March
7,771,824
98,232
7,870,056 10,0003
June
7,797,369
72,687
7,870,056 10,0003
September
7,803,429
66,644
7,870,073 10,0003
Data from prior periods can be found in Table 18.4 of the Februrary 2007 edition of Trends in Telephone Service,
which can be found at: http://www.fcc.gov/wcb/iatd/trends.html.
1 - 3 See Notes to Table 20.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 40

Table 22

Telephone Numbers Assigned for 888 Toll-Free Service1

Total Spare
Toll-Free
Working
Miscellaneous
Toll-Free
Numbers
Toll-Free
Toll-Free
Numbers
Still
Year
Month
Numbers
Numbers2
Assigned
Available
2000
September
7,806,252
173,588
7,979,840
160
December
7,789,188
177,328
7,966,516
13,484
2001
March
7,616,189
355,451
7,971,640
8,360
June
7,548,761
270,198
7,818,959
161,041
September
7,508,100
203,518
7,711,618
268,382
December
7,452,071
190,727
7,642,798
337,202
2002
March
6,964,624
577,910
7,542,534
437,466
June
6,629,862
354,771
6,984,633
995,367
September
6,682,043
92,050
6,774,093
1,205,907
December
6,610,191
154,015
6,764,206
1,215,794
2003
March
6,408,723
324,558
6,733,281
1,246,719
June
6,228,846
251,701
6,480,547
1,499,453
September
5,818,266
216,862
6,035,128
1,944,872
December
5,711,949
250,662
5,962,611
2,017,389
2004
March
5,680,105
133,824
5,813,929
2,166,071
June
5,640,743
128,141
5,768,884
2,211,116
September
5,716,957
210,068
5,927,025
2,052,975
December
5,563,469
384,320
5,947,789
2,032,211
2005
March
5,465,594
159,097
5,624,691
2,355,309
June
5,306,927
296,729
5,603,656
2,376,344
September
5,314,969
221,122
5,536,091
2,443,909
December
5,265,331
196,817
5,462,148
2,517,852
2006
March
5,049,966
321,175
5,371,141
2,608,859
June
4,930,939
387,726
5,318,665
2,661,335
September
4,923,018
282,840
5,205,858
2,774,142
December
4,894,774
154,764
5,049,538
2,930,462
2007
March
4,865,839
172,035
5,037,874
2,942,126
June
4,892,896
211,491
5,104,387
2,875,613
September
5,014,039
143,278
5,157,317
2,822,683
December
5,075,256
134,928
5,210,184
2,769,816
2008
March
5,131,254
300,830
5,432,084
2,547,916
June
5,153,074
328,514
5,481,588
2,498,412
September
5,212,933
131,617
5,344,550
2,635,450
December
5,204,756
195,377
5,400,133
2,579,867
2009
March
5,221,440
186,536
5,407,976
2,572,024
June
5,306,134
123,891
5,430,025
2,549,975
September
5,468,278
120,409
5,588,687
2,391,313
December
5,690,770
117,469
5,808,239
2,171,761
2010
March
5,984,221
177,361
6,161,582
1,818,418
June
6,441,045
129,510
6,570,555
1,409,445
September
6,588,038
80,657
6,668,695
1,311,305
Data from prior periods can be found in Table 18.5 of the Februrary 2007 edition of Trends in Telephone Service,
which can be found at: http://www.fcc.gov/wcb/iatd/trends.html.
1 - 2 See Notes to Table 20.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 41

Table 23

Telephone Numbers Assigned for 877 Toll-Free Service1

Total Spare
Toll-Free
Working
Miscellaneous
Toll-Free
Numbers
Toll-Free
Toll-Free
Numbers
Still
Year
Month
Numbers
Numbers2
Assigned
Available
2000
September
6,539,180
496,015
7,035,195
944,805
December
6,391,285
719,333
7,110,618
869,382
2001
March
6,289,079
469,980
6,759,059
1,220,941
June
6,094,898
715,097
6,809,995
1,170,005
September
6,163,297
489,084
6,652,381
1,327,619
December
6,214,863
345,468
6,560,331
1,419,669
2002
March
6,174,529
340,472
6,515,001
1,464,999
June
6,016,107
267,320
6,283,427
1,696,573
September
5,656,158
275,722
5,931,880
2,048,120
December
5,448,276
421,984
5,870,260
2,109,740
2003
March
5,132,413
579,240
5,711,653
2,268,347
June
4,791,792
376,236
5,168,028
2,811,972
September
4,617,147
170,787
4,787,934
3,192,066
December
4,536,366
191,410
4,727,776
3,252,224
2004
March
4,528,716
163,856
4,692,572
3,287,428
June
4,550,870
146,826
4,697,696
3,282,304
September
4,537,840
214,197
4,752,037
3,227,963
December
4,551,486
254,082
4,805,568
3,174,432
2005
March
4,590,227
139,089
4,729,316
3,250,684
June
4,498,452
232,477
4,730,929
3,249,071
September
4,476,657
193,315
4,669,972
3,310,028
December
4,424,365
212,543
4,636,908
3,343,092
2006
March
4,387,383
178,974
4,566,357
3,413,643
June
4,227,659
203,501
4,431,160
3,548,840
September
4,216,739
221,090
4,437,829
3,542,171
December
4,158,082
191,476
4,349,558
3,630,442
2007
March
4,160,134
126,236
4,286,370
3,693,630
June
4,176,830
168,005
4,344,835
3,635,165
September
4,186,296
140,506
4,326,802
3,653,198
December
4,236,995
151,687
4,388,682
3,591,318
2008
March
4,243,519
150,600
4,394,119
3,585,881
June
4,312,293
204,414
4,516,707
3,463,293
September
4,105,708
266,286
4,371,994
3,608,006
December
4,126,424
187,099
4,313,523
3,666,477
2009
March
4,159,486
144,758
4,304,244
3,675,756
June
4,390,811
169,577
4,560,388
3,419,612
September
4,583,580
138,286
4,721,866
3,258,134
December
4,942,751
131,204
5,073,955
2,906,045
2010
March
5,398,377
159,913
5,558,290
2,421,710
June
5,930,660
205,829
6,136,489
1,843,511
September
6,458,985
151,866
6,610,851
1,369,132
Data from prior periods can be found in Table 18.6 of the Februrary 2007 edition of Trends in Telephone Service,
which can be found at: http://www.fcc.gov/wcb/iatd/trends.html.
1 - 2 See Notes to Table 20.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 42

Table 24

Telephone Numbers Assigned for 866 Toll-Free Service1

Total Spare
Toll-Free
Working
Miscellaneous
Toll-Free
Numbers
Toll-Free
Toll-Free
Numbers
Still
Year
Month
Numbers
Numbers2
Assigned
Available
2000
September
672,250
155,646
827,896
7,152,104
December
1,274,732
148,548
1,423,280
6,556,720
2001
March
1,652,602
361,888
2,014,490
5,965,510
June
1,944,520
362,880
2,307,400
5,672,600
September
2,256,792
308,801
2,565,593
5,414,407
December
2,416,040
307,089
2,723,129
5,256,871
2002
March
2,640,414
321,530
2,961,944
5,018,056
June
2,864,605
219,232
3,083,837
4,896,163
September
2,977,379
244,297
3,221,676
4,758,324
December
3,227,589
271,965
3,499,554
4,480,446
2003
March
3,461,686
299,700
3,761,386
4,218,614
June
3,486,674
420,477
3,907,151
4,072,849
September
3,609,244
265,446
3,874,690
4,105,310
December
3,770,595
238,641
4,009,236
3,970,764
2004
March
3,966,922
231,683
4,198,605
3,781,395
June
4,281,378
263,560
4,544,938
3,435,062
September
4,476,150
281,577
4,757,727
3,222,273
December
4,712,400
298,891
5,011,291
2,968,709
2005
March
5,015,324
267,412
5,282,736
2,697,264
June
5,047,314
487,471
5,534,785
2,445,215
September
5,259,730
352,226
5,611,956
2,368,044
December
5,467,782
271,423
5,739,205
2,240,795
2006
March
5,613,475
211,021
5,824,496
2,155,504
June
5,803,923
205,051
6,008,974
1,971,026
September
6,078,119
160,737
6,238,856
1,741,144
December
6,201,362
212,896
6,414,258
1,565,742
2007
March
6,355,241
207,073
6,562,314
1,417,686
June
6,555,756
240,460
6,796,216
1,183,784
September
6,685,581
219,067
6,904,648
1,075,352
December
6,853,093
176,023
7,029,116
950,884
2008
March
7,001,587
191,687
7,193,274
786,726
June
7,192,852
225,175
7,418,027
561,973
September
7,304,334
284,988
7,589,322
390,678
December
7,493,634
262,118
7,755,752
244,248
2009
March
7,752,906
193,240
7,946,146
33,854
June
7,766,358
185,149
7,951,507
28,493
September
7,702,169
165,567
7,867,736
112,264
December
7,608,417
173,458
7,781,875
198,125
2010
March
7,758,447
135,697
7,894,144
85,856
June
7,819,430
157,837
7,977,267
2,733
September
7,768,964
193,268
7,962,232
17,768
1 - 2 See Notes to Table 20.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 43

Table 25

Area Codes by State (1947 - 2010)

Area
Area Code
Area
Area Code
Area
Area Code
Area
Area Code
Code
State/Jurisdiction
Opened
Code
State/ Jurisdiction
Opened
Code
State/ Jurisdiction
Opened
Code
State/ Jurisdiction
Opened
205
Alabama
Jan-47
478
Georgia
Aug-00
612
Minnesota
Jan-47
267
Pennsylvania
Jul-99
251
Alabama
Jun-01
678
Georgia
Jan-98
651
Minnesota
Jul-98
412
Pennsylvania
Jan-47
256
Alabama
Mar-98
706
Georgia
May-92
763
Minnesota
Feb-00
484
Pennsylvania
Jun-99
334
Alabama
Jan-95
762
Georgia
May-06
952
Minnesota
Feb-00
570
Pennsylvania
Dec-98
938
Alabama
Jul-10
770
Georgia
Aug-95
228
Mississippi
Sep-97
610
Pennsylvania
Jan-94
907
Alaska
Jan-57
912
Georgia
Jan-54
601
Mississippi
Jan-47
717
Pennsylvania
Jan-47
684
American Somoa
Oct-04
671
Guam
Jul-97
662
Mississippi
Apr-99
724
Pennsylvania
Feb-98
480
Arizona
Mar-99
808
Hawaii
Jan-57
769
Mississippi
Mar-05
814
Pennsylvania
Jan-47
520
Arizona
Mar-95
208
Idaho
Jan-47
314
Missouri
Jan-47
878
Pennsylvania
Aug-01
602
Arizona
Jan-47
217
Illinois
Jan-47
417
Missouri
Jan-50
787
Puerto Rico
Mar-96
623
Arizona
Mar-99
224
Illinois
Jan-02
573
Missouri
Jan-96
939
Puerto Rico
Sep-01
928
Arizona
Jun-01
309
Illinois
Jan-57
636
Missouri
May-99
401
Rhode Island
Jan-47
327
Arkansas
May-13
312
Illinois
Jan-47
660
Missouri
Oct-97
803
South Carolina
Jan-47
479
Arkansas
Jan-02
331
Illinois
Oct-07
816
Missouri
Jan-47
843
South Carolina
Mar-98
501
Arkansas
Jan-47
618
Illinois
Jan-47
406
Montana
Jan-47
864
South Carolina
Dec-95
870
Arkansas
Apr-97
630
Illinois
Aug-96
308
Nebraska
Jan-55
605
South Dakota
Jan-47
209
California
Jan-58
708
Illinois
Nov-89
402
Nebraska
Jan-47
423
Tennessee
Sep-95
213
California
Jan-47
773
Illinois
Oct-96
531
Nebraska
Mar-11
615
Tennessee
Jan-54
310
California
Nov-91
779
Illinois
Mar-07
702
Nevada
Jan-47
731
Tennessee
Feb-01
323
California
Jun-98
815
Illinois
Jan-47
775
Nevada
Dec-98
865
Tennessee
Nov-99
408
California
Jan-59
847
Illinois
Jan-96
603
New Hampshire
Jan-47
901
Tennessee
Jan-47
415
California
Jan-47
872
Illinois
Nov-09
201
New Jersey
Jan-47
931
Tennessee
Sep-97
424
California
Aug-06
219
Indiana
Jan-47
551
New Jersey
Dec-01
210
Texas
Nov-92
442
California
Nov-09
260
Indiana
Jan-02
609
New Jersey
Jan-57
214
Texas
Jan-47
510
California
Sep-91
317
Indiana
Jan-47
732
New Jersey
Jun-97
254
Texas
May-97
530
California
Nov-97
574
Indiana
Jan-02
848
New Jersey
Dec-01
281
Texas
Nov-96
559
California
Nov-98
765
Indiana
Feb-97
856
New Jersey
Jun-99
325
Texas
Apr-03
562
California
Jan-97
812
Indiana
Jan-47
862
New Jersey
Dec-01
361
Texas
Feb-99
619
California
Jan-82
319
Iowa
Jan-47
908
New Jersey
Nov-90
409
Texas
Nov-82
626
California
Jun-97
515
Iowa
Jan-47
973
New Jersey
Jun-97
430
Texas
Feb-03
650
California
Aug-97
563
Iowa
Mar-01
505
New Mexico
Jan-47
432
Texas
Apr-03
657
California
Sep-08
641
Iowa
Jul-00
575
New Mexico
Oct-07
469
Texas
Jul-99
661
California
Feb-99
712
Iowa
Jan-47
212
New York
Jan-47
512
Texas
Jan-47
707
California
Jan-59
316
Kansas
Jan-47
315
New York
Jan-47
682
Texas
Oct-00
714
California
Jan-51
620
Kansas
Feb-01
347
New York
Oct-99
713
Texas
Jan-47
747
California
May-09
785
Kansas
Jul-97
516
New York
Jan-51
806
Texas
Jan-57
760
California
Mar-97
913
Kansas
Jan-47
518
New York
Jan-47
817
Texas
Jan-53
805
California
Jan-57
270
Kentucky
Apr-99
585
New York
Nov-01
830
Texas
Jul-97
818
California
Jan-84
502
Kentucky
Jan-47
607
New York
Jan-54
832
Texas
Jan-99
831
California
Jul-98
606
Kentucky
Jan-55
631
New York
Nov-99
903
Texas
Nov-90
858
California
Jun-99
859
Kentucky
Apr-00
646
New York
Jul-99
915
Texas
Jan-47
909
California
Nov-92
225
Louisiana
Aug-98
716
New York
Jan-47
936
Texas
Feb-00
916
California
Jan-47
318
Louisiana
Jan-57
718
New York
Sep-84
940
Texas
May-97
925
California
Mar-98
337
Louisiana
Oct-99
845
New York
Jun-00
956
Texas
Jul-97
949
California
Apr-98
504
Louisiana
Jan-47
914
New York
Jan-47
972
Texas
Sep-96
951
California
Jul-04
985
Louisiana
Feb-01
917
New York
Jan-92
979
Texas
Feb-00
303
Colorado
Jan-47
207
Maine
Jan-47
929
New York
Apr-11
385
Utah
Mar-09
719
Colorado
Mar-88
240
Maryland
Jun-97
252
North Carolina
Mar-98
435
Utah
Sep-97
720
Colorado
Jun-98
301
Maryland
Jan-47
336
North Carolina
Dec-97
801
Utah
Jan-47
970
Colorado
Apr-95
410
Maryland
Oct-91
704
North Carolina
Jan-47
802
Vermont
Jan-47
203
Connecticut
Jan-47
443
Maryland
Jun-97
828
North Carolina
Mar-98
340
Virgin Islands
Jun-97
475
Connecticut
Dec-09
339
Massachusetts
May-01
910
North Carolina
Nov-93
276
Virginia
Sep-01
860
Connecticut
Aug-95
351
Massachusetts
May-01
919
North Carolina
Jan-54
434
Virginia
Jun-01
302
Delaware
Jan-47
413
Massachusetts
Jan-47
980
North Carolina
Apr-01
540
Virginia
Jul-95
202
District of Columbia
Jan-47
508
Massachusetts
Jul-88
701
North Dakota
Jan-47
571
Virginia
Mar-00
239
Florida
Mar-02
617
Massachusetts
Jan-47
670
Northern Marianas Is.
Jul-97
703
Virginia
Jan-47
305
Florida
Jan-47
774
Massachusetts
May-01
216
Ohio
Jan-47
757
Virginia
Jul-96
321
Florida
Nov-99
781
Massachusetts
Sep-97
234
Ohio
Oct-00
804
Virginia
Jun-73
352
Florida
Dec-95
857
Massachusetts
May-01
330
Ohio
Mar-96
206
Washington
Jan-47
386
Florida
Feb-01
978
Massachusetts
Sep-97
419
Ohio
Jan-47
253
Washington
Apr-97
407
Florida
Apr-88
231
Michigan
Jun-99
440
Ohio
Aug-97
360
Washington
Jan-95
561
Florida
May-96
248
Michigan
May-97
513
Ohio
Jan-47
425
Washington
Apr-97
727
Florida
Jul-98
269
Michigan
Jul-02
567
Ohio
Jan-02
509
Washington
Jan-57
754
Florida
Aug-01
313
Michigan
Jan-47
614
Ohio
Jan-47
304
West Virginia
Jan-47
772
Florida
Feb-02
517
Michigan
Jan-47
740
Ohio
Dec-97
681
West Virginia
Mar-09
786
Florida
Mar-98
586
Michigan
Sep-01
937
Ohio
Sep-96
262
Wisconsin
Sep-99
813
Florida
Jan-53
616
Michigan
Jan-47
405
Oklahoma
Jan-47
274
Wisconsin
Mar-12
850
Florida
Jun-97
734
Michigan
Dec-97
539
Oklahoma
Apr-11
414
Wisconsin
Jan-47
863
Florida
Sep-99
810
Michigan
Dec-93
580
Oklahoma
Nov-97
534
Wisconsin
Aug-10
904
Florida
Jul-65
906
Michigan
Mar-61
918
Oklahoma
Jan-53
608
Wisconsin
Jan-55
941
Florida
May-95
947
Michigan
Sep-02
458
Oregon
Feb-10
715
Wisconsin
Jan-47
954
Florida
Sep-95
989
Michigan
Apr-01
503
Oregon
Jan-47
920
Wisconsin
Jul-97
229
Georgia
Aug-00
218
Minnesota
Jan-47
541
Oregon
Nov-95
307
Wyoming
Jan-47
404
Georgia
Jan-47
320
Minnesota
Mar-96
971
Oregon
Oct-00
470
Georgia
Feb-10
507
Minnesota
Jan-54
215
Pennsylvania
Jan-47
Source: North American Numbering Plan Administrator. Note: Implementation dates after 2009 are scheduled dates.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 44

Table 26

Area Code Assignments (1999-2009)

Implementation
Previous
Added
Location
Date1
Code
Code
Texas (Houston)
Jan-99
713
832
California
Feb-99
805
661
Texas
Feb-99
512
361
Arizona
Mar-99
602
480
Arizona
Mar-99
602
623
Kentucky
Apr-99
502
270
Mississippi
Apr-99
601
662
Alberta
May-99
403
780
Missouri
May-99
314
636
Michigan
Jun-99
616
231
Pennsylvania
Jun-99
610
484
California
Jun-99
619
858
New Jersey
Jun-99
609
856
New York (Manhattan)
Jun-99
212
646
Pennsylvania
Jul-99
215
267
Texas (Dallas)
Jul-99
214
469
Florida
Sep-99
941
863
Wisconsin
Sep-99
414
262
New York
Oct-99
718
347
Louisiana
Oct-99
318
337
Florida
Nov-99
407
321
New York
Nov-99
516
631
Tennessee
Nov-99
423
865
Texas
Feb-00
409
936
Texas
Feb-00
409
979
Minnesota
Feb-00
612
763
Minnesota
Feb-00
612
952
Virginia
Mar-00
703
571
Kentucky
Apr-00
606
859
New York
Jun-00
914
845
Iowa
Jul-00
515
641
Georgia
Aug-00
912
229
Georgia
Aug-00
912
478
Oregon
Oct-00
503
971
Texas
Oct-00
817
682
Ohio
Oct-00
330
234
Kansas
Feb-01
316
620
Louisiana
Feb-01
504
985
Tennessee
Feb-01
901
731
Florida
Feb-01
904
386
Ontario
Mar-01
416
647
Iowa
Mar-01
319
563
North Carolina
Apr-01
704
980
Michigan
Apr-01
517
989
Massachusetts
May-01
508
774
Massachusetts
May-01
617
857
Massachusetts
May-01
781
339
Massachusetts
May-01
978
351
Pennsylvania
May-01
484
8352
Pennsylvania
May-01
267
4453
Virginia
Jun-01
804
434
Ontario
Jun-01
905
289
Alabama
Jun-01
334
251
Arizona
Jun-01
520
928
Florida
Aug-01
954
754
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 45

Table 26

Area Code Assignments (1999-2009) -- Continued

Implementation
Previous
Added
Location
Date1
Code
Code
Pennsylvania
Aug-01
412
878
Virginia
Sep-01
540
276
Puerto Rico
Sep-01
787
939
Michigan
Sep-01
810
586
British Columbia
Nov-01
604
778
New York
Nov-01
716
585
New Jersey
Dec-01
201
551
New Jersey
Dec-01
732
848
New Jersey
Dec-01
973
862
Ohio
Jan-02
419
567
Illinois
Jan-02
847
224
Indiana
Jan-02
219
260
Indiana
Jan-02
219
574
Arkansas
Jan-02
501
479
Florida
Feb-02
561
772
Florida
Mar-02
941
239
Michigan
Jul-02
616
269
Michigan
Sep-02
248
947
Texas
Feb-03
903
430
Texas
Apr-03
915
325
Texas
Apr-03
915
432
California
Jul-04
909
951
Mississippi
Mar-05
601
769
Dominican Republic
Aug-05
809
829
Georgia
May-06
706
762
California
Aug-06
310
424
Ontario
Oct-06
519
226
Quebec
Nov-06
514
438
Illinois
Mar-07
815
779
Illinois
Oct-07
630
331
New Mexico
Oct-07
505
575
California
Sep-08
714
657
Kentucky
Jan-09
270
364
Utah
Mar-09
801
385
California
May-09
818
747
Illinois
Nov-09
312
872
California
Nov-09
760
442
Connecticut
Dec-09
203
475
Oregon
Feb-10
541
458
Alabama
Jul-10
256
938
Wisconsin
Aug-10
715
534
Nebraska
Mar-11
402
531
Kentucky
Oct-11
270
364
Oklahoma
Apr-11
918
539
New York
Apr-11
347
929
Wisconsin
Mar-12
920
274
Arkansas
May-13
870
327
Note: For years 1984 - 1998, see Industry Analysis Division, Wireline Competition
Bureau, Trends in Telephone Service (August 2003).
1 Implemenation dates after 2009 are scheduled dates.
2 The NANPA was able to reclaim area code 835. See Planning Letter 344.
3 The NANPA was able to reclaim area code 445. See Planning Letter 332.
Source: North American Numbering Plan Administrator (NANPA), which can be accessed at
www.nanpa.com. Planning letters can be found at www.nanpa.com/planning_letters/index.html.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 46

Table 27

Number of Digits Necessary to Dial Local and Toll Calls from Wireline Phones

as of June 2010

Local Calls

Toll Calls

Toll Calls

Within Same

Between

Within Same

Between

Require

State

Area Code

Area Codes

Area Code

Area Codes

Dialing 1 +

Alabama
7 1
10 2
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Alaska
7
1 + 10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Arizona
7
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Arkansas
7 3
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
California
7 4
1 + 10
7 4
1 + 10
No
Colorado
7 5
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Connecticut
7 6
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Delaware
7
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
District of Columbia
7
10
NA
1 + 10
Yes
Florida
7 7
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Georgia
7 8
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Hawaii
7
NA
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Idaho
6
7
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Illinois
7 9
1 + 10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Indiana
7
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Iowa
7
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Kansas
7
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Kentucky
7
10 10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Louisiana
7
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Maine
7
1 + 10
7
1 + 10
No
Maryland
10
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Massachusetts
10 11
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Michigan
7 12
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Minnesota
7
10 13
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Mississippi
7 14
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Missouri
7 15
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Montana
7
7
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Nebraska
7 16
7 16
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Nevada
7
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
New Hampshire
7
1 + 10
7
1 + 10
No
New Jersey
10 17
1 + 10
10 17
1 + 10
No
New Mexico
7
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
New York
7 18
1 + 10
7 18
1 + 10
No
North Carolina
7 19
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
North Dakota
7
7
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Ohio
7 20
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Oklahoma
7 21
7 21
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Oregon
10 22
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Pennsylvania
10 23
1 + 10 24
10 23
1 + 10 24
No
Rhode Island
7
1 + 10
7
1 + 10
No
South Carolina
7
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
South Dakota
7
7
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Tennessee
7
10 25
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Texas
7 26
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Utah
10 27
10 27
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Vermont
7
1 + 10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Virginia
7 28
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Washington
7 29
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
West Virginia
10
10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Wisconsin
7 30
1 + 10
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
Wyoming
7
7
1 + 10
1 + 10
Yes
NA - Not Applicable.
Source: NPA database. The database is available at www.nanpa.com/area_codes/index.html.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 47

Notes to Table 27

1
In area code 256, 659 and 938, 10-digit dialing is used.
2
In area code 659, 1+10-digit dialing is used.
3
In area codes 327, 10-digit dialing is used.
4
In area codes 310, 442, 424, 657, 714, 747, 760 and 818, 1+10-digit dialing is used.
5
In area codes 303 and 720, 10-digit dialing is used.
6
In area codes 475 and 959, 10-digit dialing is used.
7
In area codes 305, 321, 407, 689, 754, 786, and 954, 10-digit dialing is used.
8
In area codes 404, 470, 678, 762, 706 and 770, 10-digit dialing is used.
9
In area codes 224, 331, 464, 447, 630, 779, 815, 847 and 872, 1+ 10-digit dialing is used.
In addition, in area code 770, 10-digit dialing is used.
10
In area codes 270, 364 and 502, 7-digit dialing is used.
11
In area code 413, 7-digit dialing is used.
12
In area codes 248, 679 and 947, 10-digit dialing is used.
13
In area codes 218, 320, and 507, 7-digit dialing is used.
14
In area codes 601 and 769, 10-digit dialing is used.
15
In area code 557 and 975, 10-digit dialing is used.
16
In area code 531, 10-digit dialing is used.
17
In area codes 609, 856, and 908, 7-digit dialing is used.
18
In area codes 212, 347, 646, 718, 917 and 929, 1+10 digit dialing is used.
19
In area codes 704, 980 and 984, 10-digit dialing is used.
20
In area codes 234, 283, 330, 380, 419, and 567, 10-digit dialing is used.
21
In area code 539, 10-digit dialing is used.
22
In area code 541, 7-digit dialing is used.
23
In area codes 570, 717, and 814, 7-digit dialing is used.
24
In some area codes, local calls to some other area codes may be dialed using 10 digits.
25
In area codes 615 and 931, 7-digit dialing is used.
26
In area codes 214, 281, 430, 469, 682, 713, 817, 832, 903, and 972, 10-digit dialing is used.
27
In area code 435, 7-digit dialing is used.
28
In area codes 571 and 703, 10-digit dialing is used.
29
In area code 564, 10-digit dialing is used.
30
In area code 274 and 534, 10-digit dialing is used.
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Numbering Resource Utilization in the United States 48

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