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Commission Document

FY 2015 Performance Budget

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Released: March 7, 2014

Federal

Communications

Commission

Fiscal Year 2015 Budget Estimates

Submitted to Congress

March 2014


Table of Contents




Page












Introduction:

................................................................................................................................ 1


FY 2015 Request:


• Summary of Request .......................................................................................................... 3


• Proposed Appropriation Language .................................................................................... 4


• Legislative Proposals ......................................................................................................... 5


• Summary of FY 2013-FY 2015 FTEs and Funding Comparison...................................... 6


• FYs 2013-2015 Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Distribution by Goal ................................... 7


• Historical & Estimated FTEs ............................................................................................ 8


• Summary of Changes ......................................................................................................... 9


• Narrative Explanation of Changes ................................................................................... 10


• Economy Act Agreements/Reimbursable ........................................................................ 15


Performance Plan:

• FCC Strategic Goals – 2012 through 2016 ...................................................................... 16


Fee Collections and Auctions:

................................................................................................... 32




i

Bureaus and Offices FY 2015 Requirements:


• Table of Contents of FY 2015 Requirements .................................................................. 37


• Office of Chairman and Commissioners ......................................................................... 38


• Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau ................................................................. 39


• Enforcement Bureau ........................................................................................................ 41


• International Bureau ........................................................................................................ 43


• Media Bureau ................................................................................................................... 45


• Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau ................................................................. 46



• Wireless Telecommunications Bureau ............................................................................ 49


• Wireline Competition Bureau .......................................................................................... 50


Agency Offices:


• Office of Administrative Law Judges ............................................................................ 51


• Office of Communications Business Opportunities ...................................................... 53


• Office of Engineering and Technology ......................................................................... 55


• Office of General Counsel ............................................................................................. 57


• Office of Inspector General ........................................................................................... 59


• Office of Legislative Affairs .......................................................................................... 61

ii



• Office of the Managing Director ................................................................................... 62


• Office of Media Relations ............................................................................................. 63


• Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis ......................................................... 64


 Office of Workplace Diversity ...................................................................................... 65


Appendices:


 Summary of Requested Resources .................................................................................. 67


 Summary Tables – Distribution of Resources ................................................................. 68


 Distribution of Resources by Goal .................................................................................. 82


 Summary of Increases by Budget Object Class Code ..................................................... 83


• Allocation of Obligations by Object Class Code ............................................................. 84


• Pro Rata Allocation of Obligations by Object Class Code .............................................. 85


Exhibits and Reports



• Universal Service Exhibit ................................................................................................ 86


• Auction Program and Loan Financing Exhibit ................................................................ 87


• Responses to Congressional Inquiries Concerning GAO ................................................ 91





iii





















INTRODUCTION











Introduction


The Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission) is pleased to present its fiscal year
(FY) 2015 budget request. The FCC is requesting a budget of $375,380,313 to carry out the FCC’s
functions and meet the expectations of Congress.

The FCC’s FY 2015 budget submission includes requests for funding to:
(1) support reform of the Universal Service Fund Support Program;
(2) provide resources for mission-critical systems to ensure that they are operational during a
Continuity of Operations (COOP) event;
(3) create a Do-Not-Call registry for telephone numbers used by Public Safety Answering Points
(PSAPs);
(4) to replace Enforcement Bureau’s Equipment;
(5) support Commission-wide information technology improvements through new FTEs; extending
the enterprise storage; big data cybersecurity analytics; and cybersecurity authorization,
admission, and education; and
(6) improve the evolution of the Broadband map.

In furtherance of these objectives and the FCC’s mission, the FY 2015 budget request will be used to
support the following Strategic Goals:

Strategic Goal 1: Connect America


Maximize Americans’ access to and use of affordable fixed and mobile broadband where they live,
learn, work, and travel.

Strategic Goal 2: Maximize Benefits of Spectrum

Maximize the availability of spectrum in order to provide diverse and affordable communications
services to consumers.

Strategic Goal 3: Protect and Empower Consumers


Empower consumers by ensuring that they have the tools and information they need to make informed
choices in their use of communications services; protect consumers from harm in the communications
market.

Strategic Goal 4: Promote Innovation, Investment, and America’s Global Competitiveness

Ensure that all lawful content can be provided, and accessed, without artificial barriers; promote
innovation in a manner that improves the nation’s ability to compete in the global economy, creating a
virtuous circle that results in more investment and in turn enables additional innovation.

Strategic Goal 5: Promote Competition


Ensure a competitive market for communications and media services to foster innovation, investment,
and job creation, and to ensure consumers have meaningful choice in affordable services.

Strategic Goal 6: Public Safety and Homeland Security

Promote the availability of reliable, interoperable, redundant, rapidly restorable critical
communications infrastructures that are supportive of all required services.


- 1 -


Strategic Goal 7: Advance Key National Purposes

Through international and national interagency efforts, advance the use of broadband for key national
purposes.

Strategic Goal 8: Operational Excellence


Make the FCC a model for excellence in government by effectively managing the FCC’s human,
information, and financial resources; by basing decisions on sound data and analyses; and by
maintaining a commitment to transparent and responsive processes that encourage public involvement
and best serve the public interest.


The FCC’s FY 2015 budget submission also includes a request for the spending of Auctions funding at
$106 million to support the timely implementation of the Incentive Auctions program.

As in prior years, the FCC is submitting its FY 2015 budget request information at the organizational
level to show the proposed use of resources. In addition, the FCC’s budget request also shows the
proposed use of funds by key accounts within each bureau or office. This format provides a detailed
view of the FCC’s proposed use of budgetary resources. We welcome the budgetary process and stand
ready to provide Congress with the information to ensure effective oversight of the FCC.








- 2 -














FY 2015 REQUEST









SUMMARY OF REQUEST

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is requesting a FY 2015 appropriation of $375,380,313. We project the FCC will employ
1,790 full-time equivalents (FTEs) in FY 2015 from requested resources.

The FCC will use the FY 2015 funds to carry out its fundamental mission to ensure that the American people have available, at reasonable costs and
without discrimination, rapid, efficient, Nation - and world-wide communications services whether by radio, television, wire, satellite, or cable.
($ in thousands)

FY 2014

FY 2015

Congressional

Congressional

Requested

FTE

Appropriation

FTE

Request

FTE

Changes

Budget Authority to use Offsetting Collections:

Regulatory Fees - Commission
1,689
$328,754
1,738
$364,290
49
$35,536
Regulatory Fees - OIG
46
$11,090
52
$11,090
6
$0

Total Offsetting Collections

1,735
$339,844
1,790
$375,380
55
$35,536

Authority to spend Other Offsetting Collections:

Economy Act/Misc. Other Reimbursables
$6,000
$6,000
$0
Auction Cost Recovery Reimbursements - Commission
$98,033 1/
$105,481 1/
$7,448
Auction Cost Recovery Reimbursements - OIG
$706 1/
$519 1/
($187)

Subtotal: Budget Authority Offsetting Collections

$104,739
$112,000
$7,261

Subtotal: Offsetting Collections

1,735
$444,583
1,790
$487,380
55
$42,797

Other Budget Authority:
Credit Program Account

$1,933
$500
($1,433)
Universal Service Fund (USF)
0
$3,315 2/
0
$4,130 2/
0
$815

Subtotal: Other Budget Authority

0
$5,248
0
$4,630
0
($618)

Total Gross Proposed Budget Authority

1,735
$449,831
1,790 3/
$492,010
55
$42,179
1/ The Auctions request of $106M in FY 2015 represents a increase of $7.3M from FY 2013 & FY 2014 for Incentive Auctions of $98.7M.
2/ The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008 (P.L. 110-161) authorizes use of $21.5M to be used by the Office of the Inspector General for USF Audit Support. In FY 2008 -
FY 2013, $13.9M was obligated. The remaining $7.6M has been carried forward, as follows $3.3M is estimated to be used in FY 2014 and $4.3M will be used in FY 2015.
3/ The total request of 1,790 FTEs is an increase of 55 FTEs, which includes 10 new FTEs to support the IT Center and 45 new hires for USF support oversight.

- 3 -



FY 2015 PROPOSED APPROPRIATION LANGUAGE



For necessary expenses of the Federal Communications Commission, as authorized by law, including
uniforms and allowances therefore, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. §§ 5901-5902; not to exceed $4,000 for
official reception and representation expenses; purchase and hire of motor vehicles; special counsel
fees; and services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. § 3109, $375,380,313, to remain available until expended:
Provided, That $375,380,313 of offsetting collections shall be assessed and collected pursuant to
section 9 of title I of the Communications Act of 1934, shall be retained and used for necessary
expenses and shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That the sum herein
appropriated shall be reduced as such offsetting collections are received during fiscal year 2015 so as
to result in a final fiscal year 2015 appropriation estimated at $0: Provided further, That any offsetting
collections received in excess of $375,380,313 in fiscal year 2015 shall not be available for obligation:
Provided further, That remaining offsetting collections from prior years collected in excess of the
amount specified for collection in each year and otherwise becoming available on October 1, 2014,
shall not be available for obligation: Provided further, That, notwithstanding 47 U.S.C. § 309(j)(8)(B),
proceeds from the use of a competitive bidding system that may be retained and made available for
obligation shall not exceed $106,200,000 for fiscal year 2015, including not to exceed $518,981 for
obligation by the Office of the Inspector General: Provided further, That, of the amount appropriated
under this heading, not less than $11,090,000 shall be for the salaries and expenses of the Office of
Inspector General.





- 4 -



Legislative Proposals


The Administration is proposing legislative changes in the President’s FY 2015 Budget that pertain to
the FCC and that are designed to improve spectrum management and represent sound economic policy.
The proposed legislative changes are included below.


Spectrum License User Fee

To promote efficient use of the electromagnetic spectrum, the Administration proposes to provide the
FCC with express authority to use other economic mechanisms, such as fees, as a spectrum
management tool. The FCC would be authorized to set user fees on unauctioned spectrum licenses,
which could be useful in certain instances. Fees would be phased in over time to determine the
appropriate application and level for fees. Fee collections are estimated to begin in 2015, and total
$4.8 billion through 2024.

Repurpose 1675 -1680 Megahertz using Auction or Fee Authority


The Administration proposes to direct that the FCC use either auction or fee authority to repurpose
spectrum frequencies between 1675-1680 megahertz for wireless broadband use by 2017, subject to
sharing arrangements with Federal weather satellites. Currently, the spectrum is being used for
radiosondes (weather balloons). A new weather satellite that is scheduled for launch in 2015 will
operate in adjacent frequencies. If this proposal is enacted, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration would move the radiosondes to another frequency, allowing the spectrum to be
repurposed for commercial use with limited protection zones for the remaining weather satellite
downlinks. Without this proposal, these frequencies are unlikely to be repurposed to commercial
use. The proposal is expected to raise $230 million over the next 10 years.

Auction Domestic Satellite Service Spectrum Licenses

The FCC would be allowed to assign licenses for certain satellite services that are predominantly
domestic through competitive bidding, as had been done before a 2005 court decision called the
practice into question on technical grounds. The proposal is expected to raise $50 million from 2015-
2024.






- 5 -




SUMMARY OF FY 2013 - FY 2015 FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs) AND FUNDING BY BUREAU

AND OFFICE

FY 13

FY 14

FY 15

(Dollars in Thousands ($000))

FTEs

Appropriation

FTEs

Congressional

FTEs

Congressional

Actuals

Appropriation

(Note 1)
Request

Chairman and Commissioners

16
$4,241
30
$6,708
30
$6,824

Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau

160
$23,304
160
$25,315
160
$26,254

Enforcement Bureau

264
$44,137
264
$46,251
264
$47,670

International Bureau

119
$21,094
119
$21,427
119
$21,798

Media Bureau

181
$26,920
181
$28,051
181
$28,539

Public Safety & Homeland Security Bureau

113
$18,386
113
$18,262
113
$18,577

Wireless Telecommunications Bureau

215
$15,537
215
$16,800
215
$17,091

Wireline Competition Bureau

178
$30,270
178
$30,934
217
$38,529

Office of Administrative Law Judges

4
$385
4
$550
4
$560

Office of Commun. Business Opportunities

12
$1,903
12
$2,015
12
$2,050

Office of Engineering & Technology

82
$13,804
82
$14,393
82
$14,641

Office of the General Counsel

71
$13,040
71
$13,734
71
$13,973

Office of Legislative Affairs

12
$2,007
11
$2,107
11
$2,143

Office of the Managing Director

209
$91,152
204
$93,765
214
$113,056

Office of Media Relations

14
$2,489
14
$2,525
14
$2,569

Office of Strategic Planning & Policy Analysis

26
$3,954
26
$5,079
26
$9,166

Office of Workplace Diversity

5
$821
5
$837
5
$851

FCC SUBTOTAL

1,681
$313,443
1,689
$328,754
1,738
$364,290

Office of Inspector General

42
$9,061
46
$11,090
52
$11,090

FCC TOTAL

1,723
$322,504
1,735
$339,844
1,790
$375,380

Note 1:

The total request of 1,790 FTEs is an increase of 55 FTEs, which includes 10 new FTEs to support the IT Center and 45 new
hires for USF support oversight.

- 6 -




FY 2013 - FY 2015 Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Distribution by Goal

Maximize

Prote ct &

Ame rica's

Public Safety

Adance Key

Connect

Benefits of

Empowe r

Global

Promote

& Homeland

National

Operational

Ame rica

Spe ctrum

C onsume rs

C ompe titive ne ss

C ompe tition

Se curity

Purpose s

Exce lle nce

Total

13
14
15
13
14
15
13
14
15
13
14
15
13
14
15
13
14
15
13
14
15
13
14
15
13
14
15

Commissioners

Offices

1
2
2
1
2
2
4
7
7
1
2
2
5
8
8
2
4
4
1
3
3
1
2
2
16
30
30

Bureaus

Consumer &
Governmental Affairs
9
9
9
2
2
2
102
102
102
0
0
0
21
21
21
13
13
13
0
0
0
13
13
13
160
160
160
Enforcement
1
1
1
48
48
48
88
88
88
1
1
1
52
52
52
60
60
60
0
0
0
14
14
14
264
264
264
International
9
9
9
29
29
29
0
0
0
36
36
36
40
40
40
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
119
119
119
Media
3
3
3
80
80
80
0
0
0
0
0
0
72
72
72
3
3
3
11
11
11
12
12
12
181
181
181
Public Safety &
Homeland Security
4
4
4
16
16
16
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
88
88
88
1
1
1
3
3
3
113
113
113
Wireless T elecomm.
60
60
60
88
88
88
1
1
1
1
1
1
35
35
35
6
6
6
7
7
7
17
17
17
215
215
215
Wireline Competition
58
58
97
2
2
2
38
38
38
0
0
0
74
74
74
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
6
6
178
178
217
Subtotal Bure aus
144
146
146
265
146
146
229
146
146
38
146
146
295
146
146
173
146
146
20
146
146
66
146
146
1,230
1,230
1,269

Offices

Admin. Law Judges
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
4
4
Comm. Business Ops.
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
2
0
0
0
10
10
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
12
12
12
Engineering and T ech.
7
7
7
65
65
65
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
0
0
0
4
4
4
3
3
3
82
82
82
General Counsel
12
12
12
4
4
4
7
7
7
0
0
0
32
32
32
5
5
5
4
4
4
7
7
7
71
71
71
Legislative Affairs
4
4
4
0
0
0
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
4
3
3
12
11
11
Managing Director
5
5
11
24
23
22
18
17
16
0
0
0
4
4
3
8
7
6
2
2
2
148 146
154
209
204
214
Media Relations
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
14
14
14
14
14
14
Strategic Planning/
Policy Analysis
5
5
5
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
10
10
10
1
1
1
4
4
4
3
3
3
26
26
26
Workplace Diversity
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
5
5
5
5
5
Subtotal O ffice s
33
33
39
96
95
94
30
29
28
0
0
0
63
63
62
15
14
13
14
14
14
184
181
189
435
429
439
Subtotal 178
182
188
362
243
242
263
182
181
39
148
148
363
217
216
190
164
163
35
164
164
251
329
337
1,681
1,689
1,738
Inspector General
5
6
7
0
7
8
13
14
14
0
1
2
1
1
2
0
1
2
0
1
2
23
15
15
42
46
52

Totals (Note 1) 183

188
195
362
251
250
276
196
195
39
149
150
364
218
218
190
165
165
35
165
166
274
344
352
1,723
1,735
1,790

Note 1:

The total request of 1,790 FTEs is an increase of 55 FTEs, which includes 10 new FTEs to support the IT Center and 45 new hires for USF support oversight.

- 7 -



FCC Historical & Estimated FTEs

FY 1994 - 2015

2,200
2,112
2,100
2,046 2,037
2,015
2,005
1,992
2,000
1,983
1,933
1,925
1,931
1,899
1,900
1,831
1,816
1,793
1,790
1,800
1,776 1,779 1,775 1,776
1,735
1,725 1,723
1,700
1,600
94
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15

Fiscal Years

Full-time equivalent (FTE) employment – is the basic measure of the levels of employment used in the budget. It is the total number of hours worked (or to be worked) divided by the
number of compensable hours applicable to each fiscal year, e.g., 2,080 hours worked equals 1 FTE.


- 8 -



SUMMARY OF CHANGES

($ in thousands)

FY 2014

FY 2015

Net Change From

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

FY 2014 Request

Offsetting Collections
$328,754
$364,290
$35,536
Offsetting Collections - OIG
11,090
11,090
0

Total Offsetting Collection/Spending Authority

$339,844
$375,380
$35,536
FCC Full-time Equivalents
1,689
1,738
49
FCC-OIG Full-time Equivalents
46
52
6

Total Full-time Equivalents 1/

1,735
1,790
55

Explanation of Changes

FCC - Commission without Office of the Inspector
General

Amount

Inflationary Increases to Base:

Salary Increases - Pay Raise (1%)
$2,133
Non Salary Increases (1.6%)
$1,524
FERS Retirement Increase
$2,182
Subtotal
$5,839

Adjustments to the Base:

Support for Reform of the Universal Service Fund Support Program
$10,877
Continuity of Operations Plan
$520
Public Safety Answering Points - Do Not Call Registry
$500
Broadband Map (Transfer from NTIA)
$3,000
Enforcement Bureau Equipment
$625
New FTEs for ITC Support
$610
Subtotal
$16,132

Programmatic Increases:

IT Storage Expansion
$1,290
Big Data Cybersecurity Analytics
$700
Cybersecurity Authorization, Admission, & Education
$800
Cybersecurity Metrics Program
$575
Modernization of Aging IT Systems
$9,200
Broadband Map (One-time Cost)
$1,000
Subtotal
$13,565
FCC Subtotal - before the Office of the Inspector General
$35,536
FCC-OIG Subtotal
$0
Total
$35,536
1/ The total request of 1,790 FTEs is an increase of 55 FTEs, which includes 10 new FTEs to support the IT Center and 45
new hires for USF support oversight.

- 9 -



Narrative Explanation of Increases and Decreases



Inflationary Increases to Base








$5,839,312

1. Personnel Compensation and Benefits. The requested $2,133,618 provides funds to cover the cost
of the 1% FY 2015 pay raise for 75% of the fiscal year, funds to annualize 25% of the FY 2014 pay
raise (.5%), and funds to cover the cost of pay increases resulting from actions other than pay raises
(such as time-in-grade step increases) and increases in health benefit costs.

2. FERS Retirement Cost Increase. The requested $2,181,792 will provide funding to cover the
expected increase in FERS Retirement benefits.

3. Non-Salary Increases. The requested $1,523,902 provides expected inflationary increases for
space rentals (GSA and non-GSA facilities), phones, utilities, printing and reproduction services,
contractual services, and supplies. These increases are developed in accordance with OMB
guidelines for projected inflationary costs (1.6%).


Other Increase Base









$16,132,000


1. Reform of the Universal Service Fund Support Program: ($10,877,000)


This request is for funds to support the Commission’s work to modernize and reform the Universal
Service Fund (USF) Support programs. Since 2009, the Commission has taken major steps to
modernize the four USF support programs with a particular emphasis on improving broadband
connectivity nationwide. In 2010, the Commission undertook fundamental reform of the rural
portion of the USF program to repurpose approximately $4.5 billion annually to provide broadband
to all Americans, including the more than 19 million unserved homes. In 2011, the Commission
reformed the Lifeline program, which provides basic phone service to low-income families,
realizing cost savings of more than $200 million in the past year and repurposing a portion of those
savings to initiate a pilot program to provide broadband to low-income families. Also in 2011, the
Commission undertook reform of the under-utilized program that provides broadband connectivity
to non-profit rural health care providers, allowing them to realize cost savings through increased
use of the telemedicine program. More resources are required to continue the Commission’s work
to modernize USF, implement reforms, increase its oversight of the newly-reformed programs and
provide for critical enforcement of the rules. This request will support funding for additional staff
including, attorneys, economists, IT specialists, program managers, and technologists.

2. Continuity of Operation Plan: ($520,000)


The Commission must provide for its mission-critical systems to be redundant and fully
operational in a Continuity of Operations (COOP) event. The Commission has many (over 20)
mission-critical IT systems and is undertaking an ongoing review of such systems, starting with the
highest priority systems, to determine what actions are needed to be fully operational in such an
event. In the past two years, the FCC has assessed two of its most important mission-critical
systems, the Universal Licensing System (ULS) and the Office of Engineering and Technology’s
Frequency Assignment System (OFACS). The ULS is an interactive licensing database system
- 10 -



used to track wireless licenses and to process and approve new applications, including emergency
applications during disasters. This system is used for both commercial and public safety licenses.
The ULS enables the FCC, public safety frequency coordinators, and the public to efficiently
search for application and license information. OFACS is also essential for the conduct of the
FCC’s spectrum management and coordination responsibilities. OFACS enables FCC spectrum
personnel to access all major FCC spectrum license databases and to provide frequency assignment
records to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), our primary
partner in the conduct of the Nation’s spectrum management activities.

3. Public Safety Answering Points (PSAP) Do Not Call Registry: ($500,000)

Section 6507 of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 requires the FCC to
create a Do-Not-Call registry for telephone numbers used by Public Safety Answering Points
(PSAPs) and to prohibit the use of automatic dialing equipment to contact those numbers. PSAPs
are facilities that have been designated to receive emergency calls and route them to emergency
service personnel. On October 17, 2012, the FCC released a report and order to create such a
registry. Under the statute, verified PSAP administrators or managers must be able to place into the
PSAP registry telephone numbers that are used for the provision of emergency services or for
communications between public safety agencies.

4. Broadband Map (Transfer from NTIA): ($3,000,000)


In FY 2014 and prior fiscal years the Broadband Map costs were included in NTIA’s
appropriations from Congress. Then, NTIA entered into reimbursable agreements with the FCC for
the work performed by the Commission staff. In FY 2015, the Commission will be fully
responsible for the Broadband Map. The modernization of FCC Form 477 will drive an evolution
of the national broadband map to further improve its utility as a key resource of broadband
deployment for consumers, policymakers, researchers, economists, and others. The online platform
will leverage previous investments with new approaches to open government data, creating a
robust and sustainable online platform. The ongoing cost of these efforts for FY 2015 will be $3
Million. The Commission has requested $1 million as a one-time initiative for the Broadband Map.

5. Enforcement Bureau Equipment: ($625,000)
An important part of the Enforcement Bureau's (EB) responsibilities is the enforcement of
technical rules and interference resolution, particularly in the areas of homeland security and public
safety. Emerging technology is adding increased complexity to the resolution of harmful
interference that affects both federal and local government operated public safety services, and
critical infrastructure. As radio technology evolves, manufacturers of test and measurement
equipment also follow those advances, and EB's technical capability must also keep pace with the
evolving technology.
6. FTEs for Information Technology Center Support ($610,000)
Analysis performed in 2010 of other agencies comparable to the FCC in workforce size and budget
showed that such organizations, on average, have 72 FTEs providing IT support and services. The
FCC, in contrast, has only 37 IT FTEs. Funds are requested to support the hiring of 10 new FTEs
- 11 -



for FY 2015 to perform inherently governmental functions of FCC security, IT project
management, and IT contract oversight and management.
This request represents a conservative increase, recognizing the constraints of the budget, and is
necessary to meet the current demand and work of the IT office and address concerns of under-
resourcing this important work. While a larger request would allow the FCC to perform more
efficiently, even offsetting the increased funding in realized efficiencies and reduced costs (such as
reducing the number of contractors needed and better managing long-term investment) the FCC
will work to leverage this conservative increase to achieve such goals, since, without such increase,
the FCC faces significant risk. The agency’s IT workforce has been drastically reduced in recent
years. The FTEs most likely to leave the agency are those representing the bulk of the agency’s
institutional knowledge base. Without increased resources in this critical area, the FCC faces the
inability to onboard a sufficient amount of new talent to engage in knowledge transfer from more
senior FTEs before those FTEs either retire or move on to other more lucrative careers. Loss of that
institutional knowledge could put FCC's legacy IT systems at substantial operational risk.


New Program Performance Initiatives







$13,565,000


1. Commission-wide Information Technology: $12,565,000


During FY 2014, the Commission will continue the work of creating a more robust cybersecurity
program and upgrading mission critical systems. In FY 2015, the Commission will need to invest
additional resources in order to sustain and build upon these efforts.

IT Storage Expansion ($1.290M)
: The FCC needs to expand the tiered enterprise storage solution
to include off-site external storage providers, lower cost storage servers, distributed file systems,
and off-site backup and replication technologies. The solution will be able to move seamlessly and
access data stored in multiple locations through multiple providers without impacting the users or
business applications in the Commission. The system will be scalable at all levels and storage
locations and will provide for improved disaster recovery and COOP capabilities.

Big Data Cybersecurity Analytics ($700K): Big Data Cybersecurity Analytics is applying big data
technologies to Cybersecurity. Current big data technologies are seeing tremendous success in
social media, intelligence, and marketing industries. These technologies will mature through the
year with acceptance by the Cybersecurity community in 2015.

Current big data technology includes massive data repositories, cloud technology, and the use of
unstructured data. Big Data Cybersecurity Analytics will be a disruptive technology in the
Cybersecurity arena, as traditional analysis and forensics techniques will be superseded by
automation conveniences that reduce the burden of work on the analyst. Big data will become a
platform for new methods of analysis. This will greatly increase the Commission’s abilities to
perform Root Cause Analysis.

One example of such analysis is the reverse engineering of malware on computer networks.
Current techniques use a variety of mechanisms to reassemble, export, quantify, and analyze
behavior of malware. Pending capability and skill set, this task can take weeks to perform, as it
- 12 -



involves a number of analysis steps to retrieve a call graph of malware execution from a
disassembler. Big Data Cybersecurity Analytics will present options that automate this capability,
reduce the analyst burden, and improve the ability to quickly perform this function.

Cybersecurity Authorization, Admission & Education ($800K): Authorization & Admission is
going to be an evolving concern as applications like Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) are
installed onto our networks. This challenge is similar to those we face with physical network
access. Instead of worrying about unauthorized computers being attached to the physical network,
organizations must be concerned with virtual computers. These virtual computers must be
authorized before they may be admitted to the network enclave.

A current challenge organizations have solved is network access control for physical computers. A
favorite tactic of auditors is to sneak a computing device into a building and plug it into the
network. They use this to gain unfettered access to network resources and demonstrate that their
client’s network is vulnerable to attack. This has been solved most recently with network access
control technologies that probe new devices to make certain they match network requirements.

With virtualization comes new challenges. Now computers can spawn within the network and on
computers already connected to the network. At this point, the computers already have access to
the network. Authorization and admission technology for virtual computers is required to prevent
this from happening. Applications must be authorized to access network resources. This prevents
attacks analogous to the physical computer. Trusted operating systems have this as a limited
capability, but this must be expanded to include networks.

As technology continues to evolve, it is becoming more important for the average user to
understand Cybersecurity and the steps necessary to protect FCC data. As the FCC moves into a
new area of VDI and Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), the Commission opens itself to
vulnerabilities that can be best thwarted by good user education of Security Best Practices.

Cybersecurity Metrics Program ($575K): The FCC has initiated planning efforts to collect and
analyze monthly metrics related to the cybersecurity threats addressed using data obtained from
commercial sources. For example, metrics such as the number of bot infections across an ISP’s
customer base will be provided to Cybersecurity and Communications Reliability Division
(CCRD) for analysis and baseline tracking. Once effective metrics begin to be voluntarily reported
in FY14, the FCC will implement a Cybersecurity Dashboard to track the commercially-obtained
data to support the analysis process. The Cybersecurity Dashboard will help the FCC track the
ongoing progress of cybersecurity initiatives.

Modernization of Aging IT Systems (9.2M): About 40% of the FCC's application portfolio is more
than 10 years old, and 70% of the IT portfolio depends on depreciated, legacy technologies. FCC is
making significant investments in FY14 in a modular, modern, open standardized computing
platform that allows reusability of IT modules across the FCC Bureaus and Offices where
appropriate. In FY15, the FCC seeks to modernize the application environment via bottom-up,
modular architecture approach to a current, secure, open-source based, and cloud-friendly
framework that is significantly more manageable and sustainable and consistent with this modular,
modern platform. Modular modernization of legacy systems will reduce maintenance and long-
term support costs of the portfolio, enable significant application consolidation, improve security
controls, enable the Commission to move applications to an external cloud or host, and reduce the
risk of a critical legacy system failure during a national spectrum auction.
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This bottoms-up, modular modernization effort also will significantly reduce/enable closure of
open FISMA findings, make ongoing remediation efforts more efficient, reduce the risk of cyber-
exploits on aged infrastructure, and greatly improve the agency’s computer security posture. The
modular approach will focus on smaller IT modules that can be reused. The modular approach will
also incorporate improvements that save time, save money, or reduce the number of workers
required to carry out the work flows of the different FCC Bureaus and Offices. Without this
modular modernization effort, FCC legacy application support and maintenance costs will continue
to increase at a much higher rate than is sustainable, as support and maintenance for outdated
technologies becomes more difficult to locate and more costly to procure.

2. Bureaus and Offices:
$1,000,000

Broadband Map ($1.0M): The modernization of FCC Form 477 will drive an evolution of the
national broadband map to further improve its utility as a key resource of broadband deployment
for consumers, policymakers, researchers, economists, and others. The online platform will
leverage previous investments with new approaches to open government data, to create a robust
and sustainable online platform. A one-time cost of $1 Million is required in order to
accommodate the increase in data collected under Form 477, improve access to the public, and
provide long-term stability for the national broadband map; to accomplish this, an investment in
programming code, software licensing, and cloud service expansion is required. The Commission
requested $3 Million as a base increase for the Broadband Map.


- 14 -



Economy Act Reimbursable Agreements


In FY 2013, the Commission earned approximately $3.2M in Economy Act Reimbursable
Agreements with other Federal agencies, of which the National Telecommunications
Information Administration (NTIA) holds the largest agreement in the amount of $1.8M. The
Commission has agreements ranging from $20K to $724K with other agencies such as
Broadcasting Board of Governors, Department of State, and Department of Justice, General
Services Administration, and many others. The Commission estimates that in FY 2014 and FY
2015, reimbursable agreements will total close to $6M per year.



- 15 -






















PERFORMANCE PLAN











FCC PERFORMANCE PLAN



Mission


Section One of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended states that the mission of the Federal
Communications Commission (FCC) is to “regulat[e] interstate and foreign commerce in communications by
wire and radio so as to make available, so far as possible, to all the people of the United States, without
discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex, a rapid, efficient, Nation-wide and
world-wide wire and radio communication service with adequate facilities at reasonable charges, for the purpose
of the national defense, for the purpose of promoting safety of life and property…” 1

Vision Statement

The FCC’s vision is to promote innovation, investment, competition, and consumer empowerment in and on top
of the communications platforms of today and the future – maximizing the power of communications
technology to grow our economy, create jobs, enhance U.S. competitiveness, and unleash broad opportunity and
a higher quality of life for all Americans.

About the Federal Communications Commission

The FCC is an independent regulatory agency of the United States (U.S.) Government. The FCC is charged
with regulating interstate and international communications by radio, television, wire, satellite, and cable. The
FCC also regulates telecommunications services for hearing-impaired and speech-impaired individuals, as set
forth in Title IV of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The FCC is directed by five Commissioners appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate for five-
year terms, except when filling the unexpired term of a previous Commissioner. Only three Commissioners can
be from the same political party at any given time. The President designates one of the Commissioners to serve
as Chairman.

The FCC is organized by function. There are seven Bureaus and ten Offices. The Bureaus and the Office of
Engineering and Technology process applications for licenses to operate facilities and provide communications
services, analyze complaints from consumers and other licensees, conduct investigations, develop and
implement regulatory programs, and organize and participate in hearings and workshops. Generally, the Offices
provide specialized support services. The Bureaus and Offices are:

The Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau

develops and implements consumer policies, including
disability access and policies affecting tribal nations. The Bureau serves as the public face of the FCC
through outreach and education, as well as responding to consumer inquiries and complaints. The Bureau
also maintains collaborative partnerships with state, local, and Tribal governments in such critical areas as
emergency preparedness and implementation of new technologies.

The Enforcement Bureau

enforces the Communications Act and the FCC’s rules. It protects consumers,
ensures efficient use of spectrum, furthers public safety, and promotes competition.


1 47 U.S.C. § 151.
- 16 -



The International Bureau

administers the FCC’s international telecommunications and satellite programs
and policies, including licensing and regulatory functions. The Bureau promotes pro-competitive policies
abroad, coordinating the FCC’s global spectrum activities and advocating U.S. interests in international
communications and competition. The Bureau works to promote a high-quality, reliable, globally
interconnected, and interoperable communications infrastructure.

The Media Bureau

recommends, develops, and administers policy and licensing programs relating to
electronic media, including radio and broadcast, cable, and satellite television in the United States and its
territories.

The Public Safety & Homeland Security Bureau

supports initiatives that strengthen public safety and
emergency response capabilities to better enable the FCC to assist the public, law enforcement, hospitals,
the communications industry, and all levels of government in the event of a natural disaster, pandemic, or
terrorist attack.

The Wireless Telecommunications Bureau

is responsible for wireless telecommunications policy and
licensing programs in the United States and its territories. Wireless communications services include
cellular, paging, personal communications, and other radio services used by businesses and private citizens.
The Bureau also conducts auctions of spectrum licenses.

The Wireline Competition Bureau

develops and recommends policy and licensing programs for wireline
telecommunications, including telephone landlines, and fixed (as opposed to mobile) broadband, striving to
ensure choice, opportunity, and fairness in promoting the development and availability of these services.
The Bureau has particular responsibility for the Universal Service Fund, a public-private partnership that
helps connect all Americans to communications networks.

The Office of Administrative Law Judges

is composed of one judge (and associated staff) who presides
over hearings and issue decisions on matters referred to him by the FCC.

The Office of Communications Business Opportunities

promotes competition and innovation in the
provision and ownership of telecommunications services by supporting opportunities for small businesses as
well as women and minority-owned communications businesses.

The Office of Engineering and Technology

advises the FCC on technical and engineering matters. This
Office develops and administers FCC decisions regarding spectrum allocations and grants equipment
authorizations and experimental licenses.

The Office of the General Counsel

serves as the FCC’s chief legal advisor.

The Office of the Inspector General

conducts and supervises audits and investigations relating to
FCC programs and operations.

• The Office of Legislative Affairs serves as the liaison between the FCC and Congress, as well as other
Federal agencies.

The Office of the Managing Director

administers and manages the FCC.

The Office of Media Relations

informs the media of FCC decisions and serves as the FCC’s main point of
contact with the media.

- 17 -



The Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis

works with the Chairman, Commissioners, Bureaus,
and Offices in strategic planning and policy development for the agency. It also provides research, advice,
and analysis of complex, novel, and non-traditional economic and technological communications issues.

The Office of Workplace Diversity

ensures that the FCC provides employment opportunities for all
persons regardless of race, color, sex, national origin, religion, age, disability, or sexual preference.

- 18 -



Strategic Goals


The FCC is responsible to Congress and the American people for ensuring an orderly policy framework within
which communications products and services can be efficiently and effectively provided to consumers and
businesses. Equally important, the FCC must also address the communications needs of public safety, health,
and emergency operations; ensure the universal availability of basic telecommunications service; make
communications services accessible to all people; and protect and empower consumers in the communications
marketplace. The FCC, in accordance with its statutory authority and in support of its mission, has established
eight strategic goals. They are:

Strategic Goal 1: Connect America


Maximize Americans’ access to and use of affordable fixed and mobile broadband where they live,
learn, work, and travel.

Strategic Goal 2: Maximize Benefits of Spectrum

Maximize the availability of spectrum in order to provide diverse and affordable communications
services to consumers.

Strategic Goal 3: Protect and Empower Consumers


Empower consumers by ensuring that they have the tools and information they need to make informed
choices in their use of communications services; protect consumers from harm in the communications
market.

Strategic Goal 4: Promote Innovation, Investment, and America’s Global Competitiveness

Ensure that all lawful content can be provided, and accessed, without artificial barriers; promote
innovation in a manner that improves the nation’s ability to compete in the global economy, creating a
virtuous circle that results in more investment and in turn enables additional innovation.

Strategic Goal 5: Promote Competition


Ensure a competitive market for communications and media services to foster innovation, investment,
and job creation, and to ensure consumers have meaningful choice in affordable services.

Strategic Goal 6: Public Safety and Homeland Security

Promote the availability of reliable, interoperable, redundant, rapidly restorable critical
communications infrastructures that are supportive of all required services.

Strategic Goal 7: Advance Key National Purposes

Through international and national interagency efforts, advance the use of broadband for key national
purposes.

Strategic Goal 8: Operational Excellence


Make the FCC a model for excellence in government by effectively managing the FCC’s human,
information, and financial resources; by basing decisions on sound data and analyses; and by
maintaining a commitment to transparent and responsive processes that encourage public involvement
and best serve the public interest.




- 19 -



What the FCC Commits to Accomplish in FY 2015


In implementing its strategic goals, the FCC has identified 24 strategic objectives. Each objective has associated
performance goals and targets.

When reviewing the information on the following pages, the reader should note that the FCC, through its
regulatory activities, influences numerous economic and social outcomes. However, since consumer choice,
technological innovation, economic conditions, and international negotiations can all have an effect on
outcomes, the FCC’s approach to connecting its strategic goals to its performance measures includes only those
factors within the FCC’s control.


CONNECT AMERICA



Strategic Objective 1.1:

Maximize broadband adoption by promoting affordability and removing other
barriers to adoption by all Americans, including those with low incomes and disabilities.

Performance Goals and Targets:

1.1.1
Support and facilitate the development, deployment, and adoption of broadband services across
multiple platforms.
• Carry out rulemakings, spectrum reallocation, and license modifications as needed to ensure
that the growing demand for wireless broadband services is met.
• Expeditiously review applications and issue licenses to qualified auction winners, promoting the
expanded deployment of broadband services.

Strategic Objective 1.2:

Maximize availability of broadband to all Americans and community anchor
institutions, including in rural and tribal lands, while ensuring that universal service programs are efficient,
effective, and impose no greater burden on consumers and businesses than necessary.

Performance Goals and Targets:

1.2.1
Work in partnership with state, local, and tribal governments, consumer groups and industry to
promote broadband availability to all Americans, including consumers in rural and high cost areas
and individuals with disabilities.
• In coordination with state, local, and tribal governments, and consumer and industry groups,
conduct outreach activities to educate the public concerning the Commission’s broadband
initiatives, including those promoting universal service.
• Work collaboratively across FCC offices and bureaus to identify and address tribal and native
community communications issues, including barriers to entry that operate against tribal
broadband deployment and adoption.
• Coordinate with other federal agencies on rules and policies designed to achieve access by
people with disabilities to communications and information technologies.
1.2.2
Continue reform of the universal service program to reflect technological developments and
changes in the market.
• Implement comprehensive reforms to repurpose the use of universal service funding and
accelerate broadband build-out to Americans who currently have no access to robust broadband
infrastructure.

Strategic Objective 1.3:

Enable the private sector to accelerate the deployment and expansion of broadband
networks by minimizing regulatory and other barriers to broadband build out.

Performance Goals and Targets:

1.3.1
Employ strategies to encourage investment in networks and services by existing providers, while
encouraging participation in broadband markets by new and non-traditional participants.
- 20 -



• Initiate or complete rulemaking actions that provide opportunities for innovations in broadband
services.
• Coordinate with industry and academia to identify research opportunities and impediments
towards broadband deployment.

Strategic Objective 1.4:

Measure and monitor the country’s progress on broadband.

Performance Goals and Targets:

1.4.1
Measure and report on progress towards the goals of ensuring that broadband is being deployed to
all Americans in a reasonable and timely fashion.
• Monitor and, as appropriate, revise metrics for determining the extent to which broadband is
being deployed in a reasonable and timely fashion.
• Educate consumers about delivered speeds and performance of broadband networks and make
data publicly available to facilitate informed competitive service choices.


- 21 -



MAXIMIZE BENEFITS OF SPECTRUM




Strategic Objective 2.1:

Develop and implement flexible, market-oriented spectrum allocation and
assignment policies that promote innovation, investment, jobs and consumer benefits, including ensuring
meaningful availability of unlicensed spectrum.

Performance Goals and Targets:

2.1.1
Pursue spectrum allocation and license assignment policies to achieve the effective and efficient use
of spectrum.
• Conduct rulemaking proceedings to allow more flexible ways to allocate and assign spectrum.
• Provide opportunities for innovative and experimental use of spectrum.
2.1.2
Conduct an incentive auction of broadcast television spectrum that repurposes a large swath of
spectrum to more flexible uses, including mobile.
• Conduct a successful incentive auction of broadcast spectrum (600 MHz) planned for mid-2015.
2.1.3
Conduct effective and timely spectrum licensing and equipment authorization activities.
• Process 95% of routine spectrum license applications within 90 days of receipt.
• Process 95% of public safety spectrum license applications within 90 days of receipt
• Process 90% of applications for equipment approvals and experimental authorizations within 90
days of receipt.
• Take enforcement action in appropriate cases against violations of spectrum-related rules, such
as interference and unauthorized use of frequencies.

Strategic Objective 2.2:

Develop and implement policies that support highly efficient use of spectrum.

Performance Goals and Targets:

2.2.1
Facilitate the deployment of new or existing services and devices that use spectrum efficiently and
effectively now and for the future.
• Review and revise, as necessary, the Commission’s spectrum allocation, auctions, licensing and
technical rules and establish policies that promote the development of new technologies and the
provision of new or improved terrestrial and satellite communication services.
• Develop Commission policies and adopt items that promulgate policies designed to increase
consumers’ competitive choices for broadband, domestic and international wireline and
wireless services, and multichannel video programming equipment and services.
• Review, process and resolve in a timely manner applications for transfer of control and
assignment of licenses, as well as applications to discontinue service.
• Analyze space station licensees’ compliance with system implementation milestones and take
action, where necessary, to make unused spectrum available for new applications.



- 22 -



PROTECT AND EMPOWER CONSUMERS




Strategic Objective 3.1:

Promote transparency and disclosure.

Performance Goals and Targets:

3.1.1
Ensure that FCC policy, rulemaking, and enforcement documents clearly explain the basis for
decisions to affected parties, Congress, key constituencies, and the public.
• Decision documents will cite relevant facts and data, and sources for that information, to convey
the basis for decisions.
3.1.2
Support and encourage policies and regulations to ensure that consumers receive consistent
treatment and protections across technologies and platforms, and across FCC bureaus and offices.
• Review and recommend revisions, as necessary, to the Commission’s enforcement and
consumer protection rules and policies.
• Utilize advisory committees, task forces, and intergovernmental groups to foster
communications and coordination with industry representatives, consumer groups, and
representatives of other governmental entities.
• Review and revise, as necessary, FCC consumer publications.
• Foster collaborative efforts across all FCC bureaus and offices to promote consistent treatment
and protections across technologies and platforms in Commission proceedings.

Strategic Objective 3.2:
Act swiftly and consistently in the use of enforcement authority to protect
consumers.

Performance Goals and Targets:

3.2.1
Enforce and defend against legal challenges to the Commission's policies that promote the
competitive provisions of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, and the FCC’s rules.
• Ensure that consumers realize the benefits of competition by compiling a complete record and
working toward resolution of all formal complaints.
• Promote competition in the communications industry by taking action, where appropriate,
consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines on all complaints filed with
the FCC alleging violations of the competition provisions of the Communications Act and the
Commission’s rules.
• Promote the integrity of the communications infrastructure by taking action, where appropriate,
consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, on complaints alleging
violations of the Commission’s equipment marketing rules.
3.2.2
Ensure, through enforcement action and litigation where necessary, that consumers are protected
from anticompetitive practices and other practices that are harmful to consumers.
• Maximize compliance with the Commission’s Customer Proprietary Network Information
(CPNI) rules by reviewing annual CPNI Compliance Filings and taking enforcement action
where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, against
(1) those carriers’ filings identified as non-compliant with the Communications Act or the
Commission’s rules, and (2) those carriers that did not file annual CPNI Compliance Filings.
• Deter business practices that are in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act
(TCPA) Act by taking action, where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of
limitation and other deadlines, on complaints alleging violation of the Commission’s rules
addressing Do-Not-Call telephone solicitation requirements and restrictions on the use of pre-
recorded advertising messages, as well as provisions governing telemarketing and the use of
calling equipment.
• Enforce Commission policy in response to anti-competitive conduct in international markets,
including disruption of traffic by foreign carriers by taking action, where appropriate, consistent
with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, on all allegations and complaints
referred to the Enforcement Bureau.
- 23 -



3.2.3
Engage persons with disabilities through outreach and education initiatives to facilitate informed
choice in the telecommunications and media marketplace.
• Develop Commission rules and policies to ensure that new technologies and services are
accessible to persons with disabilities.
• Monitor and maintain clearinghouse database of accessible products and services.

Strategic Objective 3.3:

Develop and maintain policies that encourage variety in media programming
sources and services for consumers.

Performance Goals and Targets:

3.3.1
Support the development of and defend against legal challenges to media rules and policies that
comply with judicial directives and statutory requirements.
• Develop appropriate rules, policies, and licensing procedures for the effective provision of
broadcast television and radio as well as for cable and satellite television service.
• Promote competition, diversity and localism in Commission rulemaking items concerning
media ownership and the distribution of video programming.
• Review transactions proposing to transfer the control of Commission licenses to ensure that on
balance, the public interest will be served.
• Ensure that video programming continues to be accessible to all Americans, including persons
with disabilities.
3.3.2
Ensure that broadcasters comply with requirements of statutes and the FCC’s rules regarding media
ownership and public interest obligations.
• Deter violations of the Commission’s rules governing assignments and transfers of control as
well as media-related rules by taking action, where appropriate, consistent with applicable
statutes of limitation and other deadlines, on all allegations and complaints referred to the
Enforcement Bureau.
• Ensure compliance with core programming guidelines and commercial time limitations
established in the Children’s Television Act and the Commission’s rules regarding children’s
educational television by taking action, where appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of
limitations and other deadlines, on all new complaints alleging violations.
• Work to ensure compliance with the Commission’s closed captioning rules.

- 24 -



PROMOTE INNOVATION, INVESTMENT, AND AMERICA’S


GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS




Strategic Objective 4.1:
Preserve and expand networks as a platform for economic growth, innovation, job-
creation, and global competitiveness.

Performance Goals and Targets:

4.1.1
Adopt, enforce and defend against legal challenge to policies and rules that protect Internet freedom
and openness and promote robust innovation and investment throughout the broadband ecosystem.
• Ensure that consumers and innovators have clear and complete information to enable them to
make informed choices in choosing networks, devices and services.
• Ensure that consumers and innovators can send and receive lawful traffic and use the devices of
their choice.
• Ensure that consumers and innovators are protected from unreasonable discrimination.
• Monitor informal complaints involving open Internet-related allegations, and open an
investigation in appropriate cases when there is evidence of a pattern of violations.
4.1.2
Eliminate outdated rules and take action to promote the transition from circuit-switched networks to
internet protocol (IP) networks.
• Oversee tests of providing IP-based alternatives to existing services in discrete geographic areas
or situations.
• Based on results of the tests, conduct proceedings that facilitate the transition to IP networks.

Strategic Objective 4.2:

Advocate U.S. spectrum interests in the international arena.

Performance Goals and Targets:

4.2.1
Secure international spectrum allocations that allow for new services and protect incumbent services
from interference.
• As appropriate, coordinate and implement action items as adopted at the World Radio
Conference (WRC).
• Prepare materials and participate in international meetings to secure spectrum and satellite
positions as well as minimize interference issues between services through advocacy of U.S.
positions.
4.2.2
Secure and enforce bilateral spectrum treaties and agreements working with appropriate U.S. and
international government agencies.
• Prepare detailed technical analyses and effectively represent the U.S. in bilateral negotiations
and coordination activities.
• Perform all technical analysis as necessary to ensure compliance with applicable provisions of
bilateral and International Telecommunication Union (ITU) agreements and treaties.
• Secure agreements on international telecommunications regulation that provides flexibility for
the Internet and other new services.



- 25 -



PROMOTE COMPETITION




Strategic Objective 5.1:
Ensure effective policies are in place to promote and protect competition for the
benefit of consumers, including appropriate interconnection policies for communications networks.

Performance Goals and Targets:

5.1.1
Promote competitive choices for wireless, satellite, and wireline voice and data service providers,
for domestic and international services and for multichannel video programming.
• Develop Commission policies and adopt items that promulgate policies designed to increase
consumer’s competitive choices for broadband voice and data, and multichannel video
programming equipment and services.
• Promote compliance with rules designed to maximize competitive choices by taking
enforcement action in appropriate cases.
5.1.2
Evaluate and report on the competitive environment for communications services.
• Develop and publish reports, by deadlines established in legislation or Commission policy, that
provide information concerning competition in the telecommunications, broadcast, cable,
commercial wireless, and satellite industries.

Strategic Objective 5.2:

Ensure expeditious and thorough review of proposed transactions to ensure they serve
the public interest.

Performance Goals and Targets:

5.2.1
Adhere to policies and processes for transaction review that are transparent and uniform across the
FCC’s Bureaus and Offices.
• Review, process and resolve in a timely manner, applications for transfer of control and
assignment of licenses.
• Decision documents concerning mergers and transactions will cite relevant facts, sources of
information, and will convey the basis for decisions.

Strategic Objective 5.3:
Promote pro-competitive and universal access policies worldwide.

Performance Goals and Targets:

5.3.1
Actively advocate in bilateral and multilateral global discussions of issues related to
communications policy in coordination with other U.S. government agencies.
• Participate in meetings and conferences with foreign regulators to foster sound communications
policies.
• Meet with NTIA and the Department of State as necessary to coordinate U.S. positions related
to those policies.
• Work with U.S. government agencies and foreign regulators to promote international trade
policies for telecommunications services and equipment, e.g., Mutual Recognition Agreements
for telecommunications product approval.
• Work with other U.S. government agencies to participate in international studies that track the
status of global communications.
5.3.2
Support and facilitate the deployment of satellite systems.
• Initiate rulemakings that adopt technical and service rules for licensing new satellite space and
earth station facilities that will provide innovative satellite-based services and permit the more
efficient use of spectrum resources.



- 26 -



PUBLIC SAFETY AND HOMELAND SECURITY




Strategic Objective 6.1:
Promote access to effective communications services, including next generation
services, in emergency situations across a range of platforms by public safety, health, defense, and other
emergency personnel, as well as all consumers in need.

Performance Goals and Targets:

6.1.1
Enhance communications and media network reliability, including emergency preparedness and
disaster management practices.
• Ensure that communications are available during emergencies and crises by pursuing network
outage reporting enforcement actions.
• Participate in international meetings, conferences, and activities to promote the continued
reliability of the global communications infrastructure.
• Coordinate and work collaboratively across FCC offices and bureaus on rulemaking items
regarding accessibility of emergency information to persons with disabilities.
6.1.2
Ensure that the public has access to text-to-911 service from their mobile devices, including from
interconnected over-the-top messaging apps.

Strategic Objective 6.2:
Evaluate and strengthen measures for protecting the nation’s critical communications
infrastructure and facilitate rapid restoration of the U.S. communications infrastructure and facilities after
disruption by any cause, including cyberattacks.

Performance Goals and Targets:

6.2.1
Promote construction of nationwide, interoperable broadband public safety capabilities.
• Adopt and implement FCC rules that would effectuate the deployment and operation of a
common, interoperable broadband infrastructure for America’s first responders.
6.2.2
Take appropriate enforcement action for non-compliance with 911 and E911 requirements,
including defending the FCC’s rules in litigation.
• Maximize compliance with the FCC's rules governing the nationwide availability of E911
solutions to ensure that consumers have access to advanced public safety services in an
emergency by reviewing carrier compliance reports and taking enforcement action where
appropriate, consistent with statutes of limitation and other deadlines.
• Promote compliance with the FCC’s rules by taking action, where appropriate, consistent with
applicable statutes of limitations and other deadlines, on all new complaints and referrals
concerning the FCC’s 911 and E911 rules.
6.2.3
Improve the effectiveness of the Emergency Alert System (EAS).
• Promote actions to expand EAS to users of additional communications technologies and media.
• Meet at least quarterly with FEMA and other relevant agencies regarding EAS operational
issues and potential improvements.

Strategic Objective 6.3:
Act swiftly in matters affecting public safety, homeland security, and disaster
management, and implement, maintain and conduct exercises for the FCC’s Continuity of Operations Plans
(COOP) and Emergency Preparedness Plans.
Performance Goals and Targets:
6.3.1
Preserve the integrity of the communications infrastructure relating to public safety by taking action
on 100% of complaints of interference to public safety communications within one day.
• Complaints of interference to public safety communications will receive top priority in 100% of
cases.
6.3.2
Ensure that communications are available during emergencies and crises by conducting cable signal
leakage inspections to minimize harmful interference to aviation and public safety frequencies.
• Report annually on the number of cable signal leakage inspections.
- 27 -



• Maximize compliance and enhance public safety by taking enforcement action where
appropriate, consistent with applicable statutes of limitation and other deadlines, against parties
alleged to have violated the FCC’s cable signal leakage rules.
6.3.3
During crises, work closely with our federal partners such as FEMA and the National
Communications System to provide situational awareness data from the Disaster Information
Reporting System (DIRS) or data derived from the operation of Project Roll Call equipment.
• Provide all staff resources necessary during crises to gather and provide data from DIRS and
Project Roll Call.
6.3.4
Establish and maintain FCC COOP and emergency preparedness procedures to ensure accuracy,
improve effectiveness, and create a better state of readiness.
• Conduct agency-wide exercises to test procedures and provide FCC COOP team members with
the opportunity to practice their roles and responsibilities in the event the COOP is
implemented.
• Participate in federal government-wide COOP activities.
- 28 -



ADVANCE KEY NATIONAL PURPOSES




Strategic Objective 7.1:
Promote and facilitate the use of broadband to address key national challenges,
including health care, education, energy, and e-government.

Performance Goals and Targets:

7.1.1
Support and facilitate the increased use of broadband across key national purposes.
• Support the use of broadband to advance national purposes in rulemakings by promoting
innovative and flexible uses of broadband technology.
• Support the use of broadband to advance national purposes through other means, such as by
facilitating public and private partnerships across industry, government, and nonprofit
organizations.
7.1.2
Connect 99 percent of America’s students to digital learning opportunities through high-speed
broadband in their schools and libraries by 2019.
• Implement improved management and oversight to accelerate the availability of E-Rate funds.
• Restructure the E-Rate program to facilitate deployment of high-speed broadband to schools
and libraries

Strategic Objective 7.2:

Ensure that small businesses have the access to broadband and other
communications tools needed to drive innovation and economic growth.

Performance Goals and Targets:

7.2.1
Support and facilitate wired and wireless deployment and competition to ensure that small
businesses have robust broadband connectivity and meaningful choice of broadband services.
• Promote deployment of broadband services to all small businesses across the country through
continued regulatory reforms.
• Promote competition across broadband service providers by facilitating competition and market
entry.


- 29 -



OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE


Strategic Objective 8.1:
Efficiently and effectively manage the FCC’s procedures for monitoring and
processing applications, petitions, complaints and other matters before the FCC in order to achieve timeliness in
decision-making.

Performance Goals and Targets:

8.1.1
Focus the accountability of the decision-making process at the FCC, shortening the timeline for
FCC-level decisions on matters such as applications for review.
• Establish rigorous internal deadlines and update FCC tracking systems to better monitor and
report on the status of open items.
8.1.2
Streamline the licensing process.
• Develop more efficient procedures and, where possible, reduce the amount of information
applicants need to file.
8.1.3
Modernize the consumer complaint process.
• Streamline the process and create a searchable database that would enable the FCC to analyze
the data received more effectively.
8.1.4
Reduce the backlog of matters pending at the FCC and take steps to ensure that backlogs don’t build
up in the future.
• Initiate aggressive backlog reduction plans and implement procedures to address matters
promptly.

Strategic Objective 8.2:
Continuously review and examine our regulatory processes and significant
regulations to achieve statutory objectives while reducing burdens on industry and promoting innovation and job
growth.

Performance Goals and Targets:

8.2.1
Eliminate or streamline outdated regulations, and update our data collection capability so it is less
burdensome and more focused for both stakeholders and FCC staff.
• Periodically conduct a review of rules and data collections within each FCC bureau and office
with the goal of eliminating or revising requirements that are no longer needed, are inconsistent
with current technologies, or place needless burdens on citizens or businesses.

Strategic Objective 8.3:
Effectively manage the FCC’s information technology resources by maintaining
secure systems that meet the needs of both the FCC and the system users.

Performance Goals and Targets:

8.3.1
Improve Commission systems to make information readily available to agency management for
decision making.
• Ensure that internal information systems provide timely and easily accessible data to FCC
managers.
8.3.2
Upgrade and enhance technology and tools used by Commission staff to carry out the agency’s
mission.
• Provide FCC staff with information technology hardware, systems and training to create an
efficient and effective workforce.
• Continue developing custom-adapted investigative tools that enable the FCC to timely resolve
interference and take appropriate enforcement action across a wide range of services.
• Provide FCC staff with a secure digital infrastructure and maintain a high level of cyber
security readiness and presence.

Strategic Objective 8.4:

Effectively manage the human resources of the FCC in order to ensure sufficient
resources and knowledge to handle the FCC’s workload.

Performance Goals and Targets:


- 30 -



8.4.1
Develop targeted skills and competencies for FCC employees through appropriate career
development aligned with the Commission’s strategic goals.
• Provide a robust selection of training opportunities for Commission employees and encourage
employee participation.
• Reevaluate and revise, as necessary, the FCC’s Strategic Human Capital plan.

Strategic Objective 8.5:

Effectively manage the FCC’s financial resources to best achieve the FCC’s mission
and to maintain internal controls that allow for sound financial management and accounting.

Performance Goals and Targets:

8.5.1
Conduct a program of continuous review and evaluation to assure that all financial operations are
helping control or contain costs, providing high quality customer service, and improving the
effectiveness and efficiency of Commission operations.
• Maintain an effective internal controls program that complies with all applicable laws and
regulations to ensure proper stewardship of Federal resources. Promptly respond to and
remediate identified risks, operational weaknesses, and internal control deficiencies that warrant
correction.





- 31 -














FEE COLLECTIONS AND AUCTIONS













FEE COLLECTIONS AND AUCTIONS


Regulatory Fees


P.L. 103-66, “The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993,” requires that the FCC annually
collect fees and retain them for FCC use in order to offset certain costs incurred by the
Commission.

The fees collected are intended to recover the costs attributable to the Commission’s enforcement,
policy and rulemaking, user information services, and international regulatory activities.

The fees, often referred to as Section 9 fees, apply to the current holder of the license as of a
specific date and to other entities (e.g., cable television systems) which benefit from Commission
regulatory activities not directly associated with its licensing or applications processing functions.

The regulatory fees do not apply to governmental entities, amateur radio operator licensees,
nonprofit entities holding tax exempt status under section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue code, 26
U.S.C. § 501, and certain other non-commercial entities.

The provisions of this law, codified at 47 U.S.C. § 159, give the Commission authority to review
the regulatory fees and to adjust the fees to reflect changes in its appropriation from year to year. It
may also add, delete or reclassify services under certain circumstances. Additionally, the
legislation requires the Commission to charge a 25% late payment penalty and to dismiss
applications or revoke licenses for non-payment of the fees, although it may waive, reduce, or
defer payment of a fee for good cause.

The Commission implemented the Regulatory Fee Collection Program by rulemaking on July 18,
1994. The most recent fee schedule became effective on August 23, 2013, pursuant to an order
adopted by the Commission on August 8, 2013, released August 12, 2013, and published in the
Federal Register on August 23, 2013 (78 FR 52433).

Authorization to Retain Fees


Fees collected up to the level established by Congress are applied against the Commission’s
annual appropriation at the close of each fiscal year. The regulatory fee level of $339.8 million
for FY 2013 was achieved. The Commission collected $11 million above the required regulatory
level in FY 2013, which are reported as temporarily not available pursuant to Public Law.

Appropriations language for FY 2014 prohibits the Commission from using any excess offsetting
collections received in FY 2014 or any prior years. The FCC proposed the same treatment of
excess collections in its FY 2015 budget request. Currently the FCC has collected $82 million in
excess regulatory fees.

Sequestrated Regulatory Fees


The Commission receives an annual Salaries & Expense appropriation from Congress. On March
1, 2013, OMB issued a report to Congress on sequestration for FY 2013, which for the FCC
translated into a $17 million temporary reduction of new budgetary authority. The sequestered
amount is in offsetting collections and the availability of these funds is subject to appropriation
authority.
- 32 -



FY 1999 - FY 2015 RESOURCE COMPARISON

Distribution of Appropriated Budget Authority

(Dol ars in Mil ions)
$400
$375
$341
$335
$335
$339
$339
$339
$350
$313
$289
$291
$300
$281
$270
$273
$245
$250
$229
$210
$192
$200
$375
$342
$336
$336
$340
$340
$340
$312
$150
$219
$266
$273
$280
$289
$290
$200
$186
$173
$100
$50
$20
$24
$30
$26
$5
$0
$1
$1
$1
$1
$1
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001 FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015

Direct Authority (Appropriation)
Regulatory Fees (Col ection Authority)


FY 2015 Regulatory Fee Assumptions


The FY 2014 enacted appropriation maintained regulatory fees at the $339.8 million level. The
FY 2015 budget proposes an increase of regulatory fees to a level of $375.4 million. These
funds will support Commission-wide goals that will allow the FCC to serve the American public
in an efficient, effective, and responsive manner. The distribution of Budget Authority between
direct and offsetting collections from Regulatory Fees is illustrated in the above graph.
- 33 -



Application Processing Fees


Since FY 1987, the FCC has collected and deposited into the General Fund of the U.S. Treasury
application processing fees, often referred to as Section 8 fees. The fees are intended to recover a
substantial portion of the costs of the Commission’s applications processing functions. The
program encompasses over 300 different fees, with the vast majority collected at the time an
original license application, renewal, or request for modification is filed with the Commission.
Most fees are assessed as a one-time charge on a per-application basis, although there are certain
exceptions. Government, nonprofit, non-commercial broadcast, and amateur license applicants are
exempt from the fees. A lockbox bank is used to collect the fees, with all fees deposited into the
General Fund of the U.S. Treasury. Once deposited, these fees are generally not refundable
regardless of the outcome of the application process. The Commission must review and revise the
fees every two years based upon changes to the Consumer Price Index (CPI). On February 28,
2011, the Commission adopted an Order which increased application fees to reflect these CPI
changes; this change became effective June 21, 2011. Application Processing Fee Collections
(Section 8) and Regulatory Fee collections are summarized in the following graph.





FEE COLLECTIONS*

FY 1999 - FY 2015

(Dollars in Mil ions)
$450
$400
$400
$361
$365
$366
$369
$371
$365
$347
$350
$332
$318
$320
$305
$285
$300
$241
$250
$231
$214
$203
$375
$200
$308
$325
$342
$342
$342
$345
$347
$340
$293
$297
$285
$266
$150
$207
$220
$177
$187
$100
$50
$27
$28
$25
$22
$20
$21
$26
$25
$23
$22
$20
$24
$24
$25
$24
$25
$25
$0 FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001 FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015
Sec. 8 Actual
Est. Sec. 8
Sec. 9 Actual
Est. Sec. 9
- 34 -



Spectrum Auctions


The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, P.L. 103-66, required the FCC to auction
portions of the spectrum for certain services, replacing the former lottery process. The
Commission is required to ensure that small businesses, women, minorities, and rural telephone
companies have an opportunity to participate in the competitive bidding process. The Commission
initiated regulations implementing the spectrum auction authority granted by the legislation and
conducted its first round of auctions in July 1994. To date the Commission has completed 83
auctions. As of September 30, 2013, total net winning bids collected and deposited into Treasury
from this program have exceeded $51.9 billion. The original spectrum auction authority was
scheduled to expire in FY 1998. However, it was extended through FY 2007 in the Balanced
Budget Act of 1997, P.L. 105-33; FY 2011 by the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, P.L. 109-171;
2012 by the DTV Delay Act, P.L. 111-4; and most recently, the authority was extended through
September 30, 2022, by the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012, P.L. 112-96.

The Commission is authorized to retain from auction revenues those funds necessary to develop,
implement, and maintain the auction program. These funds cover the personnel and
administrative costs required to plan and execute spectrum auctions; operational costs to manage
installment payments and collections activities; development, implementation, and maintenance
of all information technology systems necessary for Auctions operations, including development
of a combinatorial bidding system; and a proportional share of the general administrative costs of
the Commission based on the split of direct FTE hours. This budget submission assumes the
auctions program will continue to recover the costs of conducting all auctions activities from
spectrum license auction receipts as the FCC continues to use auctions as a licensing mechanism
for spectrum based communications services. The FCC‘s request during the Continuing
Resolution (CR) for an anomaly in FY 2013 to fund the Auctions program was approved at
$98.7 million. The FCC’s FY 2014 Appropriations language capped the auctions program at
$98.7 million. We have requested $106 million in FY 2015 for the auctions program.

The Balanced Budget Act of 1997, P.L. 105-33, required that the Commission provide to
authorizing committees a detailed report of obligations in support of the auctions program for each
fiscal year of operation, as a prerequisite to the continued use of auctions receipts for the costs of
all auctions activities. The FY 2013 Auctions Report will be provided to the appropriate
Congressional committees by September, 2014. The FY 2014 Auctions Report will be submitted
by September, 2015.


FY 2009 - FY 2013 Auctions Activities

2009
2010
2011
2012
2013

Beginning Cash as of October 1st

$208,389,094
$86,739,323
$217,280,263
$199,151,298
$166,489,365

Current Year Net Cash

(76,190,354)
164,048,851
23,580,516
(18,800,654)
(90,056,921)

Less: Deferred Revenue as of Sept 30th 1

(27,234,636)
(33,210,155)
(41,411,725)
(13,135,795)
(6,759,936)

Less: Deposit Liability - Refunds as of Sept 30th

(18,224,781)
(297,756)
(297,756)
(725,484)
(600,544)

Available Auction Cash as of Sept 30th

$86,739,323
$217,280,263
$199,151,298
$166,489,365
$69,071,964
1 Cash associated with licenses that have not been granted.



- 35 -






FY 1994 - FY 2013 Auctions and Collections

Number of

Number of

FY

Auctions

Licences Won

Amount Collected

1994
2
604
$652,954,213
1995
2
129
$8,234,321,195
1996
6
2,026
$2,019,328,594
1997
4
1,614
$2,205,922,232
1998
2
1,388
$860,926,006
1999
6
1,693
$499,598,445
2000
8
4,403
$1,335,043,186
2001
4
3,447
$583,599,901
2002
7
7,036
$135,575,062
2003
7
3,144
$77,121,620
2004
5
267
$126,790,232
2005
6
2,803
$2,208,332,556
2006
5
1,284
$13,834,972,696
2007
5
293
$163,429,971
2008
3
1,144
$18,987,476,034
2009
2
115
$5,592,769
2010
3
4,788
$25,955,967
2011
3
126
$31,024,397
2012
1
93
$3,837,826
2013
2
3,197
$5,734,139
83
39,594
$51,997,537,040



- 36 -





























BUREAUS AND OFFICES

FY 2015 REQUIREMENTS











BUREAU/OFFICE FY 2015 REQUIREMENTS



BUREAUS


Office of Chairman and Commissioners ..................................................................................... 38
Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau ............................................................................. 39
Enforcement Bureau .................................................................................................................... 41
International Bureau .................................................................................................................... 43
Media Bureau ............................................................................................................................... 45
Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau ............................................................................. 46
Wireless Telecommunications Bureau ........................................................................................ 49
Wireline Competition Bureau ...................................................................................................... 50

AGENCY OFFICES:

Office of Administrative Law Judges ......................................................................................... 51
Office of Communications Business Opportunities ................................................................... 53
Office of Engineering and Technology ...................................................................................... 55
Office of General Counsel .......................................................................................................... 57
Office of Inspector General ........................................................................................................ 59
Office of Legislative Affairs ....................................................................................................... 61
Office of the Managing Director ................................................................................................ 62
Office of Media Relations .......................................................................................................... 63
Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis ...................................................................... 64
Office of Workplace Diversity ................................................................................................... 65

- 37 -



OFFICE OF THE CHAIRMAN AND COMMISSIONERS


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

16
30
30
11-Compensation
$3,086,845
$4,955,248
$4,998,653
12-Benefits
$835,278
$1,199,321
$1,263,762
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$3,922,123
$6,154,569
$6,262,415
21-Travel
$131,598
$229,560
$233,233
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$187,456
$319,467
$324,578
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$0
$4,000
$4,000
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$319,054
$553,027
$561,811

TOTAL

$4,241,177
$6,707,596
$6,824,226


The FCC is directed by five Commissioners appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate
for 5-year terms, except when filling an unexpired term. The President designates one of the
Commissioners to serve as Chairperson. Only three Commissioners may be members of the same
political party. None of them can have a financial interest in any Commission-related business.

The Chairman serves as the chief executive officer of the Commission, supervising all FCC activities,
delegating responsibilities to staff units and Bureaus, and formally representing the Commission before
the Congress and the Administration.
- 38 -



CONSUMER AND GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS BUREAU



2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

160
160
160
11-Compensation
$16,966,459
$18,169,325
$18,328,477
12-Benefits
$4,500,799
$4,565,315
$4,803,069
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$21,467,258
$22,734,640
$23,131,546
21-Travel
$52,661
$173,202
$175,973
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$1,104,778
$1,171,049
$1,189,786
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$678,726
$1,233,556
$1,753,293
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$684
$695
31-Equipment
$100
$2,219
$2,255
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$1,836,265
$2,580,710
$3,122,001

TOTAL

$23,303,523
$25,315,350
$26,253,546


The Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau develops and administers the Commission’s
consumer and inter-governmental affairs policies and initiatives to enhance the public’s understanding
of the Commission’s work and to facilitate the Agency’s relationships with other governmental
agencies and organizations. The Bureau is responsible for rulemaking proceedings regarding general
consumer and disability policy. The Bureau serves as the primary entity responsible for
communicating with the general public regarding Commission policies, programs, and activities in
order to facilitate public education and participation in the Commission’s decision-making processes.

The Bureau’s overall objectives include: advising the Commissioners and the other Bureaus and
Offices on consumer, disability, and inter-governmental related areas of concern or interest; initiating,
reviewing, and coordinating orders, programs, and actions, in conjunction with other Bureaus and
Offices, in matters regarding consumer and disability policy and procedures, and any other related
issues affecting consumer policy; representing the Commission on consumer and inter-governmental
related committees, working groups, task forces, and conferences within and outside the Agency; and
providing expert advice and assistance to Bureaus and Offices and consumers regarding compliance
with applicable disability and accessibility requirements, rules, and regulations.

The Bureau serves as the public face of the Commission through outreach and education, as well as
through our Consumer Center, which is responsible for responding to consumer inquiries and
complaints. The Bureau also maintains collaborative partnerships with state, local, and tribal
governments in such critical areas as emergency preparedness and implementation of new
technologies.

The Bureau’s activities include: consumer and disability policy development and coordination;
interaction with the public, federal, state, local, tribal, and other government agencies and industry
groups; oversight of the Consumer Advisory Committee, and the Intergovernmental Advisory
Committee; informal complaint mediation and resolution; consumer outreach and education;
- 39 -



maintaining official FCC records; coordination with the Office of Managing Director for Agency-wide
strategic planning efforts; and any other functions as may be assigned, delegated, or referred to the
Bureau by the Commission.

- 40 -



ENFORCEMENT BUREAU


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

264
264
264
11-Compensation
$31,197,866
$31,202,091
$31,475,402
12-Benefits
$8,434,879
$8,297,184
$8,709,482
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$39,632,745
$39,499,275
$40,184,884
21-Travel
$177,895
$269,037
$273,342
22-Transportation of Things
$27,711
$13,611
$13,829
23-Rent and Communications
$3,307,165
$3,517,661
$3,573,944
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$431,368
$617,790
$627,675
26-Supplies and Materials
$250,434
$268,205
$272,496
31-Equipment
$310,009
$2,065,519
$2,723,567
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$4,504,583
$6,751,823
$7,484,852

TOTAL

$44,137,328
$46,251,098
$47,669,736


The Enforcement Bureau serves as the primary Commission entity responsible for enforcement of the
Communications Act and other communications statutes, the Commission’s rules, orders, and
authorizations, other than matters that are addressed in the context of a pending application for a
license or other authorization or in the context of administration, including post-grant administration,
of a licensing or other authorization or registration program. The Enforcement Bureau’s
responsibilities include, among other things:

 Resolving complaints regarding:
o compliance with statutory and regulatory provisions, including complaints filed
under section 208 of the Communications Act;
o acts or omissions of non-common carriers subject to the Commission’s jurisdiction
under Title II of the Communications Act and related provisions;
o accessibility to communications services and equipment for persons with
disabilities;
o radiofrequency interference and radiofrequency equipment and devices;
o compliance with the Commission’s Emergency Alert System rules;
o the lighting and marking of radio transmitting towers;
o indecent communications subject to the Commission’s jurisdiction;
o the broadcast and cable television children’s television programming commercial
limits contained in section 102 of the Children’s Television Act;
o unauthorized construction and operation of communications facilities;
o false distress signals;
- 41 -



o Title III licensees and permittees;
o pole attachments filed under section 224 of the Communications Act;
o multichannel video and cable television service under part 76 of the Commission’s
rules; and
o other matters assigned to it by the Commission.
 Resolving universal service suspension and debarment proceedings.
 Conducting investigations and collecting information in connection with complaints, on its own
initiative, or upon request of another Bureau or Office.
 Mediating and settling disputes between service providers.
 Serving as trial staff in formal hearings conducted pursuant to 5 U.S.C. § 556 regarding
applications, revocation, forfeitures, and other matters designated for hearing.
 Providing field support for, and field representation of, the Bureau, other Bureaus and Offices,
and the Commission.
 Handling congressional and other correspondence relating to or requesting specific
enforcement actions, specific complaints, or other specific matters within the responsibility of
the Bureau, to the extent not otherwise handled by the Consumer and Governmental Affairs
Bureau, the Office of General Counsel (impermissible ex parte presentations), or another
Bureau or Office.
 Issuing non-hearing related subpoenas for the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the
production of books, papers, correspondence, memoranda, schedules of charges, contracts,
agreements, and any other records deemed relevant to the investigation of matters within the
responsibility of the Bureau.



- 42 -



INTERNATIONAL BUREAU


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

119
119
119
11-Compensation
$15,672,703
$15,954,143
$16,093,891
12-Benefits
$4,075,268
$4,014,731
$4,223,551
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$19,747,971
$19,968,874
$20,317,442
21-Travel
$329,478
$336,197
$341,576
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$999,879
$1,044,207
$1,060,914
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$15,094
$58,573
$59,510
26-Supplies and Materials
$1,200
$18,730
$19,030
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$1,345,651
$1,457,707
$1,481,030

TOTAL

$21,093,622
$21,426,581
$21,798,472


The International Bureau develops, recommends, and administers policies, standards, procedures, and
programs for the regulation of international telecommunications facilities and services, and the
licensing of satellite and submarine cable facilities under its jurisdiction. The Bureau advises and
recommends to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in the
development of and administration of international telecommunications policies and programs. The
International Bureau assumes the principal representational role for Commission activities in
international organizations. The International Bureau has the following duties and responsibilities:

 Initiating and directing the development and articulation of international telecommunications
policies, consistent with the priorities of the Commission.
 Advising the Chairman and Commissioners on matters of international telecommunications
policy, and on the status of the Commission's actions to promote the vital interests of the
American public in international commerce, national defense, and foreign policy areas.
 Developing, recommending, and administering policies, rules, and procedures for the
authorization, licensing, and regulation of international telecommunications facilities and
services, and domestic and international satellite systems.
 Representing the Commission on international telecommunications matters at both domestic
and international conferences and meetings, and directing and coordinating the Commission’s
preparation for such conferences and meetings.
 Serving as the single focal point within the Commission for cooperation and consultation on
international telecommunications matters with other federal agencies, international or foreign
organizations, and appropriate regulatory bodies and officials of foreign government.
 Directing and coordinating, in consultation with appropriate bureaus and offices, negotiation of
international agreements to provide for arrangements and procedures for bilateral coordination
- 43 -



of radio frequency assignments to prevent or resolve international radio interference involving
U.S. licensees.
 Developing, coordinating with other federal agencies, and administering regulatory assistance
and training programs for foreign administrations to promote telecommunications development.
 Providing advice and technical assistance to U.S. trade officials in the negotiation and
implementation of telecommunications trade agreements.
 Conducting economic, legal, technical, statistical, and other appropriate studies, surveys, and
analyses in support of development of international telecommunications policies and programs.
 Collecting and disseminating within the Commission information and data on international
telecommunications, and regulatory and market developments in other countries and
international organizations.
 Promoting the international coordination of spectrum allocation, and frequency and orbital
assignments, so as to minimize cases of international radio interference involving U.S.
licensees.
 Ensuring fulfillment of the Commission’s responsibilities under international agreements and
treaty obligations, and, consistent with Commission policy, ensuring that the Commission’s
regulations, procedures, and frequency allocations comply with mandatory requirements of all
applicable international and bilateral agreements.
 Overseeing and, as appropriate, administering activities pertaining to the international
consultation, coordination, and notification of U.S. frequency and orbital assignments,
including activities required by bilateral agreements, the International Radio Regulations, and
other international agreements.
 Monitoring compliance with the terms and conditions of authorizations and licenses granted by
the Bureau, and pursuing enforcement actions in conjunction with appropriate bureaus and
offices.
- 44 -



MEDIA BUREAU


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

181
181
181
11-Compensation
$20,305,303
$21,012,686
$21,196,744
12-Benefits
$5,080,832
$5,254,397
$5,529,135
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$25,386,135
$26,267,083
$26,725,879
21-Travel
$8,366
$23,521
$23,897
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$1,510,556
$1,591,762
$1,617,230
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$14,772
$155,196
$157,679
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$13,723
$13,943
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$1,533,694
$1,784,202
$1,812,749

TOTAL

$26,919,829
$28,051,285
$28,538,628


The Media Bureau develops, recommends, and administers the policy and licensing programs for the
regulation of media, including cable television, broadcast television and radio, and satellite services in
the United States and its territories. The Bureau advises and recommends to the Commission, or acts
for the Commission under delegated authority, in matters pertaining to multichannel video
programming distribution, broadcast radio and television, direct broadcast satellite service policy, and
associated matters. The Bureau will, among other things:
 Conduct rulemaking proceedings concerning the legal, engineering, and economic aspects of
electronic media services.
 Conduct comprehensive studies and analyses concerning the legal, engineering, and economic
aspects of electronic media services.
 Resolve waiver petitions, declaratory rulings, and adjudications related to electronic media
services.
 Process applications for authorization, assignment, transfer, and renewal of media services,
including AM, FM, TV, the cable TV relay service, and related matters.

- 45 -



PUBLIC SAFETY AND HOMELAND SECURITY BUREAU


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

113
113
113
11-Compensation
$13,609,919
$13,510,283
$13,628,625
12-Benefits
$3,701,222
$3,624,766
$3,803,570
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$17,311,141
$17,135,049
$17,432,194
21-Travel
$22,809
$76,886
$78,116
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$843,133
$879,493
$893,565
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$139,209
$127,543
$129,584
26-Supplies and Materials
$9,136
$11,027
$11,203
31-Equipment
$60,520
$31,985
$32,497
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$1,074,806
$1,126,934
$1,144,965

TOTAL

$18,385,947
$18,261,983
$18,577,158


The Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (PSHS) advises and makes recommendations to the
Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in all matters pertaining to public
safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster
management, and ancillary operations. The Bureau has responsibility for coordinating public safety,
homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster management,
and related activities within the Commission. The Bureau also performs the following functions:

 Develops, recommends, and administers policy goals, objectives, rules, regulations, programs,
and plans for the Commission to promote effective and reliable communications for public
safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster
management and related activities, including public safety communications (including 911,
enhanced 911, and other emergency number issues), priority emergency communications, alert
and warning systems (including the Emergency Alert System), continuity of government
operations, implementation of Homeland Security Presidential Directives and Orders, disaster
management coordination and outreach, communications infrastructure protection, reliability,
operability and interoperability of networks and communications systems, the Communications
Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), and network security. Recommends policies
and procedures for public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management
and preparedness, and recommends national emergency plans and preparedness programs
covering Commission functions during national emergency conditions. Conducts outreach and
coordination activities with, among others, state and local governmental agencies, hospitals and
other emergency health care providers, and public safety organizations. Recommends national
emergency plans, policies, and preparedness programs covering the provision of service by
communications service providers, including telecommunications service providers,
information service providers, common carriers, non-common carriers, broadcasting and cable
facilities, satellite and wireless radio services, radio frequency assignment, electro-magnetic
radiation, investigation, and enforcement.
- 46 -




 Under the general direction of the Defense Commissioner, coordinates the public safety,
homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster
management, and related activities of the Commission, including national security and
emergency preparedness and defense mobilization, Continuity of Government (COG) planning,
alert and warning systems (including the Emergency Alert System), and other functions as may
be delegated during a national emergency or activation of the President’s war emergency
powers as specified in section 706 of the Communications Act. Provides support to the
Defense Commissioner, including with respect to his/her participation in public safety and
homeland security organizations and committees. Represents the Defense Commissioner with
other Government agencies and organizations, the communications industry, and Commission
licensees on public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and
preparedness, disaster management, and related issues.

 Develops and administers rules, regulations, and policies for priority emergency
communications, including the Telecommunications Service Priority System. Supports the
Chief of the Wireline Competition, International, and Wireless Telecommunications Bureaus
on matters involving assignment of Telecommunications Service Priority System priorities and
in administration of that system.

 The Chief of PSHS Bureau or designee acts as the FCC Alternate Homeland Security and
Defense Coordinator and principal to the successor to the National Communications System,
and serves as the Commission’s representative on the successor’s committees.

 Advises and makes recommendations to the Commission, or acts for the Commission under
delegated authority, in all matters pertaining to the licensing and regulation of public safety,
homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, and disaster
management wireless telecommunications, including ancillary operations related to the
provision or use of such services.

 Conducts studies of public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency
management and preparedness, disaster management, and related issues. Develops and
administers recordkeeping and reporting requirements for communications companies
pertaining to these issues. Administers any Commission information collection requirements
pertaining to public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management and
preparedness, disaster management, and related issues.

 Interacts with the public, local, state and other governmental agencies, and industry groups
(including advisory committees and public safety organizations and associations) on public
safety, homeland security, national security, emergency management, disaster management,
and related issues. Serves as the point of contact for the U.S. Government in matters of
international monitoring, fixed and mobile direction-finding, and interference resolution, and
oversees coordination of non-routine communications and materials between the Commission
and international or regional public organizations or foreign administrations.

 Maintains and operates the Commission’s public safety, homeland security, national security,
emergency management and preparedness, and disaster management facilities and operations,
including the Communications Center, the establishment of any Emergency Operations Center
(EOC), and any liaison activities with other federal, state, or local government organizations.
- 47 -




 Reviews and coordinates orders, programs, and actions initiated by other Bureaus and Offices
in matters affecting public safety, homeland security, national security, emergency
management and preparedness, disaster management, and related issues to ensure consistency
with overall Commission policy.

 Develops and recommends responses to legislative, regulatory, or judicial inquiries and
proposals concerning or affecting public safety, homeland security, national security,
emergency management, disaster management, and related issues. Responses to judicial
inquiries should be developed with and recommended to the Office of General Counsel.

 Develops and maintains the Commission’s plans and procedures, including the oversight,
preparation, and training of Commission personnel, for Continuity of Operations (COOP),
Continuity of Government functions, and Commission activities and responses to national
emergencies and other similar situations.

 Acts on emergency requests for Special Temporary Authority during non-business hours when
the other Offices and Bureaus of the Commission are closed. Such actions shall be coordinated
with, if possible, and promptly reported to the responsible Bureau or Office.

 Maintains liaison with other Bureaus and Offices concerning matters affecting public safety,
homeland security, national security, emergency management and preparedness, disaster
management, and related issues.

 Is authorized to declare that a temporary state of communications emergency exists pursuant to
§ 97.401(b) of this chapter and to act on behalf of the Commission with respect to the operation
of amateur stations during such temporary state of communications emergency.

 Performs such other functions and duties as may be assigned or referred to it by the
Commission or the Defense Commissioner.





- 48 -



WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS BUREAU


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

215
215
215
11-Compensation
$11,839,786
$12,937,606
$13,050,931
12-Benefits
$3,154,613
$3,510,235
$3,681,802
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$14,994,399
$16,447,841
$16,732,733
21-Travel
$3,991
$14,427
$14,658
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$251,370
$282,053
$286,566
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$287,686
$56,110
$57,008
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$543,047
$352,590
$358,231

TOTAL

$15,537,446
$16,800,431
$17,090,965


The Wireless Telecommunications Bureau (WTB) advises and makes recommendations to the
Commission, or acts for the Commission under delegated authority, in matters pertaining to the
regulation and licensing of wireless communications services, devices, facilities, and electromagnetic
spectrum resources. The Bureau develops and recommends policy goals, objectives, programs, and
plans for the Commission on matters concerning wireless communications and electromagnetic
spectrum resources, drawing upon relevant economic, technological, legislative, regulatory, and
judicial information and developments. Such matters include addressing the present and future
wireless communications and spectrum needs of U.S. consumers, businesses, state, local, and tribal
governments, and other entities; promoting access, efficiency, and innovation in the allocation,
licensing and use of the electromagnetic spectrum; ensuring choice, opportunity, and fairness in the
development of wireless communication services and markets; developing policies regarding the
conduct of auctions of Commission licenses; promoting investment in wireless communications
infrastructure, including wireless broadband, and the integration and interconnection of wireless
communications networks with other communications networks and facilities; and promoting the
development and widespread availability of wireless broadband, mobile, public safety, and other
wireless communications services, devices, and facilities, including through open networks, where
appropriate.

The Bureau’s activities include developing and coordinating policy; conducting rulemaking and
licensing work; conducting spectrum auctions of wireless licenses; conducting auctions for other
services and programs as needed; and acting on applications for service and facility
authorizations. The Bureau also determines the resource impact of existing, planned, or recommended
Commission activities concerning wireless communications, and develops and recommends resources
deployment priorities. The Bureau reviews and coordinates orders, programs, and actions initiated by
other Bureaus and Offices in matters affecting wireless communications to ensure consistency of
overall Commission policy.

- 49 -




WIRELINE COMPETITION BUREAU


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

178
178
217
11-Compensation
$22,754,451
$23,267,907
$28,971,719
12-Benefits
$6,152,015
$6,131,828
$7,998,144
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$28,906,466
$29,399,735
$36,969,863
21-Travel
$9,162
$52,034
$52,867
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$1,284,833
$1,389,956
$1,412,195
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$68,688
$92,562
$94,043
26-Supplies and Materials
$499
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$1,363,182
$1,534,552
$1,559,105

TOTAL

$30,269,648
$30,934,287
$38,528,968


The Wireline Competition Bureau advises and makes recommendations to the Commission, or acts for
the Commission under delegated authority, on matters concerning wireline communications and
ancillary operations, drawing on relevant economic, technological, legislative, regulatory, and judicial
information and developments. The Bureau’s objectives include: ensuring that all Americans are
included in 21st century communications by reaching all of America with affordable broadband and
voice services; ensuring access to affordable broadband connectivity for schools, libraries, and health
care institutions; fostering competition, especially for small businesses; ensuring a sustainable
framework for competitors who rely on the facilities of others; and ensuring that the public has access
to accurate and comprehensive data about communications services, including data about broadband.

The Bureau’s activities include: policy development and coordination; adjudicatory and rulemaking
proceedings affecting wireline telecommunications service providers; administering the provisions of
the Communications Act relating to charges, practices, and classifications for wireline
telecommunications service providers to ensure that they are just and reasonable; action on requests for
interpretation or waivers of rules; determinations regarding lawfulness of carrier tariffs; action on
applications for authorization to transfer service and facility authorizations or to discontinue services
or the operation of facilities; review of carrier performance; administration of accounting requirements
for incumbent local exchange carriers; administration of FCC reporting requirements affecting
telecommunications and broadband providers; economic research and analysis; interaction with the
public, local, state, and other government agencies, industry groups, and other stakeholders on wireline
communications regulation and related matters; reviewing and coordinating orders, programs, and
actions initiated by other Bureaus and Offices in matters affecting wireline communications to ensure
consistency with overall Commission policy; and any other functions as may be assigned, delegated, or
referred to the Bureau by the Commission.

- 50 -



AGENCY OFFICES


Office of Administrative Law Judges


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

4
4
4
11-Compensation
$304,215
$433,512
$437,309
12-Benefits
$54,335
$72,361
$77,713
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$358,550
$505,873
$515,023
21-Travel
$0
$428
$435
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$22,366
$23,080
$23,449
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$4,000
$20,783
$21,116
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$26,366
$44,291
$45,000

TOTAL

$384,916
$550,164
$560,022


The Office of Administrative Law Judges (OALJ) hears and conducts all adjudicatory cases designated
for formal evidentiary hearing, other than those designated to be heard by the Commission en banc or
by one or more members of the Commission. The Office may also conduct other hearings which the
Commission may assign in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).

OALJ functions substantially as U.S. District Court Judges in non-jury cases, with the exception that
Initial Decisions rendered are subject to review by the Commission if requested by a party, or on the
Commission’s own motion.

OALJ has the following responsibilities:






Adjudicative



 Prepares and maintains hearing calendars, showing time and place of hearings.

 Presides over and conducts formal proceedings concerning investigations, rule-makings and
adjudications.

 Acts on motions, petitions and other pleadings filed in proceedings.

 Conducts on-the-record prehearing conferences.

 Issues subpoenas, administers the oath, examines witnesses, makes findings of fact, and
rules upon evidentiary questions.

- 51 -



 Prepares and issues Initial Decisions.






Administrative


 Prepares reports, statistical data and other information requested or received by the Office
of Personnel Management, and other offices or agencies of the U.S. Government concerned
with proper operation of the Office of Administrative Law Judges.

 Upon instruction of Chairman, serves as liaison for the Commission in securing advice or
information from representatives of other agencies, bar associations and interested persons
in connection with Office practices and hearing procedures.

 Exercises such authority as may be assigned by the Commission pursuant to Section 5(c) of
the Communications Act of l934, as amended.






- 52 -



Office of Communications Business Opportunities


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

12
12
12
11-Compensation
$1,414,703
$1,514,053
$1,527,315
12-Benefits
$362,803
$398,052
$418,018
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$1,777,506
$1,912,105
$1,945,334
21-Travel
$2,695
$28,192
$28,643
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$72,658
$74,980
$76,180
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$50,000
$0
$0
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$125,354
$103,172
$104,823

TOTAL

$1,902,860
$2,015,277
$2,050,156


The Office of Communications Business Opportunities (OCBO), as a staff office to the Commission,
develops, coordinates, evaluates, and recommends to the Commission policies, programs, and practices
that promote participation by small entities, women, and minorities in the communications industry. A
principal function of the Office is to lead, advise, and assist the Commission, including all of its
component Bureau/Office managers, supervisors, and staff, at all levels, on ways to ensure that the
competitive concerns of small entities, women, and minorities are fully considered by the agency in
notice and comment rulemakings. In accordance with this function, the Office:

 Conducts independent analyses of the Commission’s policies and practices to ensure that
those policies and practices fully consider the interests of small entities, women, and
minorities;
 Advises the Commission, Bureaus, and Offices of their responsibilities under the
Congressional Review Act provisions regarding small businesses; the Report to Congress
regarding Market Entry Barriers for Small Telecommunications Businesses (47 U.S.C. §
257); and the Telecommunications Development Fund (47 U.S.C. § 614).
The Office has the following duties and responsibilities:
 Serving, through its director, as the principal small business policy advisor to the
Commission;
 Developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies that promote participation
by small entities, women, and minorities in the communications industry;
 Managing the Regulatory Flexibility Analysis process pursuant to the Regulatory
Flexibility Act and the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act to ensure that
small business interests are fully considered in agency actions;
- 53 -



 Developing and recommending Commission-wide goals and objectives for addressing the
concerns of small entities, women, and minorities and reports of achievement;
 Acting as the principal channel for disseminating information regarding the Commission’s
activities and programs affecting small entities, women, and minorities;
 Developing, recommending, coordinating, and administering objectives, plans and
programs to encourage participation by small entities, women, and minorities in the
decision-making process;
 Promoting increased awareness within the Commission of the impact of policies on small
entities, women, and minorities;
 Acting as the Commission’s liaison to other federal agencies on matters relating to small
business.

- 54 -



Office of Engineering and Technology


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

82
82
82
11-Compensation
$9,936,581
$10,341,413
$10,431,997
12-Benefits
$2,674,943
$2,733,178
$2,869,680
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$12,611,524
$13,074,591
$13,301,677
21-Travel
$8,686
$20,670
$21,001
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$431,613
$461,077
$468,454
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$709,546
$699,438
$710,629
26-Supplies and Materials
$28,950
$42,231
$42,907
31-Equipment
$13,420
$94,758
$96,274
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$1,192,215
$1,318,174
$1,339,265

TOTAL

$13,803,739
$14,392,765
$14,640,942


The Office of Engineering and Technology allocates spectrum for commercial, private, and non-
Federal governmental use and provides expert advice on technical issues before the Commission,
including recommendations on technical standards for spectrum users. The Office also performs the
following duties and responsibilities:
 Developing overall policies, objectives, and priorities for the Office of Engineering and
Technology programs and activities; performing management functions; and supervising the
execution of these policies.
 Advising and representing the Commission on frequency allocation and spectrum usage
matters, including those covered by international agreements.
 Planning and directing broad programs for development of information relative to
communication techniques and equipment, radio wave propagation, and new uses for
communications, and advising the Commission and staff offices in such matters.
 Representing the Commission at various national and international conferences and meetings
devoted to the progress of communications and the development of information and standards.
 Conducting engineering and technical studies in advanced phases of terrestrial and space
communications, and special projects to obtain theoretical and experimental data on new or
improved techniques, including cooperative studies with other staff units and consultant and
contract efforts as appropriate.
 Advising the Commission and other Bureaus and Offices concerning spectrum management,
emerging technologies, technical standards, international considerations, and national security
matters involved in making or implementing policy or in resolving specific situations involving
these matters.
 Developing and implementing procedures to acquire, store, and retrieve scientific and technical
information required in the engineering work of the Commission.
- 55 -



 Providing advice to the Commission, participating in and coordinating staff work with respect
to general frequency allocation proceedings and other proceedings not within the jurisdiction of
any single Bureau, and providing assistance and advice with respect to rulemaking matters and
proceedings affecting more than one Bureau.
 Administering Parts 2, 5, 15, and 18, of the Commission’s Rules and Regulations.
 Performing technical, engineering, and management functions of the Commission with respect
to formulating rules and regulations, technical standards, and general policies for Parts 2, 5, 15
and 18, and for equipment authorization of radio equipment for compliance with all appropriate
rules.
 Maintaining liaison with other agencies of government, technical experts representing foreign
governments, and members of the public and industry concerned with communications and
frequency allocation and usage.
 Coordinating frequency assignments for Commission licensees with Federal Government
agencies, and representing the Commission on issues regarding use of spectrum when
jurisdiction is shared with the Federal Government.
 Preparing recommendations for legislation, and reviewing recommendations for rule changes
and rulemaking proposals initiated by other offices affecting Bureau programs and operations.

- 56 -



Office of General Counsel



2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

71
71
71
11-Compensation
$9,787,343
$10,446,019
$10,537,520
12-Benefits
$2,619,608
$2,690,268
$2,827,533
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$12,406,951
$13,136,287
$13,365,053
21-Travel
$6,552
$10,666
$10,837
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$624,074
$583,955
$593,298
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$2,430
$3,420
$3,475
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$633,056
$598,041
$607,610

TOTAL

$13,040,007
$13,734,328
$13,972,662

As chief legal advisor to the Commission and its various components, the Office of General Counsel
performs the following duties and responsibilities:
 Prepares and makes recommendations and interpretations concerning procedural rules of
general applicability.
 Reviews all proposed Commission orders and rules for consistency with the Constitution, laws
of the United States, and other rules and precedents.
 Represents the Commission in litigation matters.
 Ensures consistent and timely public interest analysis of transactions considered by the
Commission and providing technical expertise on various corporate, bankruptcy, fraud, and
other transactional issues.
 Assists and makes recommendations to the Commission with respect to cases of adjudication
(including the review of initial decisions by Administrative Law Judges) and such other cases
as, by Commission policy, are handled in a similar manner and that have been designated for
hearing.
 Advises and makes recommendations to the Commission with respect to proposed legislation.
 Interprets statutes, regulations, and international agreements affecting the Commission.
 Provides advice to the Commission and its components on general law issues (e.g., leases,
contracts, debt collection, tort claims, fiscal law, and labor law) common to most federal
agencies.

- 57 -



 Serves as principal advisor to the Commission in the administration of laws and regulations
regarding government ethics, as well as the Freedom of Information, Privacy, Government in
the Sunshine, and Alternative Dispute Resolution Acts.
 Exercises such authority as may be assigned or referred to it by the Commission pursuant to
section 5(c) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, as well as the Commission’s
rules.


- 58 -



Office of Inspector General


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

42
46
52
11-Compensation
$3,979,673
$6,623,747
$6,623,747
12-Benefits
$1,081,758
$1,644,655
$1,644,655
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$5,061,431
$8,268,402
$8,268,402
21-Travel
$24,436
$49,675
$49,675
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$365,033
$390,524
$390,524
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$3,514,843
$2,285,009
$2,285,009
26-Supplies and Materials
$50
$2,040
$2,040
31-Equipment
$94,795
$94,350
$94,350
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$3,999,157
$2,821,598
$2,821,598

TOTAL

$9,060,588
$11,090,000
$11,090,000


The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Office of Inspector General (OIG) was established
in compliance with the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law 94-454), as amended. The OIG
conducts and supervises audits, inspections, and investigations relating to FCC programs and
operations. The OIG provides management feedback and leadership, and recommends policies for
activities designed to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness in the administration of, and to
prevent and detect fraud and abuse in, such programs and operations. The OIG communicates with the
Commission and Congress to keep them informed about issues and deficiencies relating to the
administration of such programs and operations and the necessity for and progress of corrective action.
The Inspector General reports directly to the Commission. The primary duties and responsibilities of
the OIG include:

 Conducting, supervising, and coordinating audits and investigations relating to the programs
and operations of the FCC.

 Reviewing existing and proposed legislation and regulations relating to programs and
operations of the FCC, and making recommendations in semiannual reports required by section
5(a) of the Inspector General Act concerning the impact of such legislation or regulations on
the economy and efficiency in the administration of programs and operations administered or
financed by the FCC, and the prevention and detection of fraud and abuse in such programs and
operations.

 Recommending policies for, and conducting or coordinating other activities carried out by or
financed by the FCC for, the purpose of promoting economy and efficiency in the
administration of, or preventing and detecting fraud and abuse in, its programs and operations.

- 59 -



 Recommending policies for matters relating to the promotion of economy and efficiency in the
administration of, or the prevention and detection of fraud and abuse in, programs and
operations administered or financed by the FCC.

 Reporting expeditiously to the Attorney General whenever the Inspector General has
reasonable grounds to believe there has been a violation of Federal criminal law.















- 60 -



Office of Legislative Affairs


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

12
11
11
11-Compensation
$1,474,511
$1,597,736
$1,611,731
12-Benefits
$423,875
$431,400
$452,569
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$1,898,386
$2,029,136
$2,064,301
21-Travel
$1,315
$4,932
$5,011
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$107,167
$72,841
$74,006
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$0
$0
$0
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$108,482
$77,773
$79,017

TOTAL

$2,006,868
$2,106,909
$2,143,318


The Office of Legislative Affairs informs the Congress of the Commission’s decisions, facilitates
responses to Congressional inquiries, and provides technical assistance to Congressional staff
regarding proposed legislation. Specifically, the Office has the following functions:
 Advising and making recommendations to the Commission with respect to legislation proposed
by Members of Congress or other government agencies, and coordinating the preparation of
Commission views for submission to Congress or other government agencies.
 Tracking and monitoring legislation impacting the Commission, providing technical assistance
to Congressional staff, as necessary.
 Coordinating Commission and Bureau responses to formal inquiries by individual Members of
Congress and committees, including tracking inquiries and setting response times.
 Assisting the staffs of Members of Congress in responding to constituent concerns.
 Assisting in the preparation for, and the coordination of, the Chairman’s and Commissioners’
appearances before Committees of Congress.
 Assisting the Office of Managing Director in the preparation of the Managing Director’s annual
report to Congress, as well as with the annual submission of the Commission budget.
 Coordinating the Commission’s legislative program, obtaining Bureau and Office comments,
and drafting final legislative proposals.





- 61 -



Office of the Managing Director


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

209
204
214
11-Compensation
$17,384,785
$17,805,209
$18,794,523
12-Benefits
$4,466,614
$4,575,073
$4,693,232
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$24,034
$29,420
$29,891

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$21,875,433
$22,409,702
$23,517,646
21-Travel
$59,454
$145,489
$147,817
22-Transportation of Things
$47,480
$114,455
$116,286
23-Rent and Communications
$31,505,894
$32,427,253
$32,946,089
24-Printing and Reproduction
$1,013,283
$1,032,421
$1,048,940
25-Other Contractual Services
$33,968,589
$33,761,146
$51,142,016
26-Supplies and Materials
$1,043,680
$1,475,502
$1,499,110
31-Equipment
$1,630,583
$2,399,074
$2,637,459
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$7,270
$200
$200

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$69,276,233
$71,355,540
$89,537,917

TOTAL

$91,151,666
$93,765,242
$113,055,564


The Managing Director is appointed by the Chairman with the approval of the Commission. Under the
supervision and direction of the Chairman, the Managing Director serves as the Commission’s chief
operating official with the following duties and responsibilities:
 Providing managerial leadership to, and exercising supervision and direction over, the
Commission’s Bureaus and Offices with respect to management and administrative matters but
no substantive regulatory matters such as regulatory policy and rulemaking, authorization of
service, administration of sanctions, and adjudication.
 Formulating and administering all management and administrative policies, programs, and
directives for the Commission consistent with authority delegated by the Commission and the
Chairman, and recommending to the Chairman and the Commission major changes in such
policies and programs.
 As the administrative head of the agency, assisting the Chairman in carrying out the
administrative and executive responsibilities delegated to the Chairman.
 Advising the Chairman and the Commission on management, administrative, and related
matters; reviewing and evaluating the programs and procedures of the Commission; initiating
action or making recommendations as may be necessary to administer the Communications Act
most effectively in the public interest. Assessing the management, administrative, and resource
implications of any proposed action or decision to be taken by the Commission or by a Bureau
or Office under delegated authority; recommending to the Chairman and the Commission
program priorities, resource and position allocations, management, and administrative policies.
 Directing agency efforts to improve management effectiveness, operational efficiency,
employee productivity, and service to the public. Administering Commission-wide
management improvement programs.

- 62 -



Office of Media Relations


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

14
14
14
11-Compensation
$1,631,617
$1,794,661
$1,810,381
12-Benefits
$459,555
$492,602
$516,451
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$2,091,172
$2,287,263
$2,326,832
21-Travel
$3,814
$1,144
$1,162
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$138,114
$96,858
$98,408
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$247,217
$107,050
$108,763
26-Supplies and Materials
$8,600
$15,908
$16,163
31-Equipment
$453
$17,084
$17,357
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$398,198
$238,044
$241,853

TOTAL

$2,489,370
$2,525,307
$2,568,685


The Office of Media Relations informs the news media of Commission decisions and serves as the
Commission’s main point of contact with the media. The Office of Media Relations has the following
duties and responsibilities:
 Enhancing public understanding of and compliance with the Commission’s regulatory
requirements.
 Acting as the principal channel for communicating information to the news media on
Commission policies, programs, and activities.
 Advising the Commission on information dissemination as it affects liaison with the media.
 Managing the FCC’s Internet site and oversee the agency’s Web standards and guidelines,
including accessibility.
 Managing the audio and visual support services for the Commission.
 Also, manages the FCC's social media sites including Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr and
others.



- 63 -



Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis



2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

26
26
26
11-Compensation
$2,932,796
$3,841,794
$3,875,446
12-Benefits
$854,975
$1,061,941
$1,113,059
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$3,787,771
$4,903,735
$4,988,505
21-Travel
$2,421
$19,221
$19,529
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$163,991
$155,444
$157,931
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$0
$0
$4,000,000
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$0
$0
31-Equipment
$0
$315
$320
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$166,412
$174,980
$4,177,780

TOTAL

$3,954,183
$5,078,715
$9,166,284


The Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis (OSP) works with Bureaus and other Offices,
including those of the Chairman and other Commissioners, to develop and implement communications
policies in all areas of Commission authority and responsibility. Specifically, the Office performs
functions including:

 Acting as home for the FCC’s Chief Economist and Chief Technologist.
 Hosting Visiting Scholars from academia and elsewhere that joins the FCC on a temporary
basis to contribute to the Commission’s mission.
 Coordinating the publication of the FCC White Paper series, a forum for staff to publish
research aside from formal Commission actions.
 Working on high-priority issues at the request of the Chairman, Commissioners, or
Bureau/Office Chiefs.
 Leading outreach efforts to relevant stakeholders, e.g., within academia, think tanks, the
business community, and the capital markets.
 Providing research and expertise on request to any member of the Commission as resources
allow.







- 64 -



Office of Workplace Diversity


2013
2014
2015

Actuals

Appropriated

Cong. Request

FTE

5
5
5
11-Compensation
$572,086
$591,890
$597,075
12-Benefits
$161,820
$172,481
$180,434
13-Benefits for Former Personnel
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Personnel Costs

$733,906
$764,371
$777,509
21-Travel
$0
$0
$0
22-Transportation of Things
$0
$0
$0
23-Rent and Communications
$41,014
$42,325
$43,002
24-Printing and Reproduction
$0
$0
$0
25-Other Contractual Services
$46,430
$29,467
$29,938
26-Supplies and Materials
$0
$519
$527
31-Equipment
$0
$0
$0
42-Insurance Claims and Indemnities
$0
$0
$0

Subtotal, Non-Personnel Costs

$87,444
$72,311
$73,468

TOTAL

$821,350
$836,682
$850,977


The Office of Workplace Diversity, as a staff office to the Commission, develops, coordinates,
evaluates, and recommends to the Commission policies, programs, and practices that foster a diverse
workforce and promotes and ensures equal opportunity for all employees and candidates for
employment. A principal function of the Office is to lead, advise, and assist the Commission,
including all of its component Bureau/Office managers, supervisors, and staff at all levels, on ways to
promote inclusion and full participation of all employees in pursuit of the Commission’s mission. In
accordance with this principal function, the Office shall: (1) conduct independent analyses of the
Commission’s policies and practices to ensure that those policies and practices foster diversity in the
workforce and ensure equal opportunity for employees and applicants; and (2) advise the Commission,
Bureaus, and Offices of their responsibilities under: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as
Amended; Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended; Age Discrimination in
Employment Act of 1967, as amended; Executive Order 11478; and all other statutes, Executive
Orders, and regulatory provisions relating to workforce diversity, equal employment opportunity,
nondiscrimination, and civil rights. The Office has the following duties and responsibilities:
 Serving, through its Director, as the principal advisor to the Chairman and Commission
officials on all aspects of workforce diversity, organization, equal employment opportunity,
nondiscrimination, and civil rights.
 Providing leadership and guidance to create a work environment that values and encourages
diversity in the workforce.
 Developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies to foster a workforce whose
diversity reflects the diverse makeup of the Nation, enhances the mission of the Commission,
and demonstrates the value and effectiveness of a diverse workforce.
 Developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies that promote understanding
among members of the Commission's workforce of their differences and the value of those
- 65 -



differences, and provides a channel for communication among diverse members of the
workforce at all levels.
 Developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies to ensure that all members of
the Commission’s workforce and candidates for employment have equal access to opportunities
for employment, career growth, training, and development, and are protected from
discrimination and harassment.
 Developing and recommending Commission-wide workforce diversity goals and reporting on
achievements.
 Developing, implementing, and evaluating programs and policies to enable all Bureaus and
Offices to manage a diverse workforce effectively and in compliance with all equal
employment opportunity and civil rights requirements.
 Working closely with the Associate Managing Director - Human Resources Management to
ensure compliance with Federal and Commission recruitment and staffing requirements.
 Managing the Commission’s equal employment opportunity compliance program.
Responsibilities in this area include processing complaints alleging discrimination,
recommending to the Chairman final decisions on EEO complaints within the Commission, and
providing consulting services to employees and applicants on EEO matters.
 Developing and administering the Commission’s program of accessibility and accommodation
for disabled persons in accordance with applicable regulations.
 Representing the Commission at meetings with other public and private groups and
organizations on matters concerning workforce diversity and equal employment opportunity.
 Maintaining liaison with and soliciting views of organizations within and outside the
Commission on matters relating to equal opportunity and workforce diversity.



- 66 -











APPENDICES














FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

Summary of Requested Resources

($ in Thousands)

DISTRIBUTION OF BUDGET AUTHORITY:

Change to

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Appropriated

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Budget Authority

FCC - Commission without Office of the Inspector
General:

Direct Appropriation

$0
$0
$0
$0

Authority to Spend Offsetting Collections:
Regulatory Fees

$313,443
$328,754
$364,290
$35,536
Appropriation Total
$313,443
$328,754
$364,290
$35,536

Authority to Spend
Other Off-setting Collections:
1) Economy Act/Misc. Other

$3,227
$6,000
$6,000
$0
2) Auctions Cost Recovery Reimbursements
98,514
98,234
105,481
7,247

Other Offsetting Collections

$101,741
$104,234
$111,481
$7,247

Total Budget Authority - Available to incur obligations

$415,184
$432,988
$475,771
$42,783

Other Budget Authority

Credit Program Account 1/
$571
$1,933
$500
($1,433)

FCC - Office of the Inspector General:
Direct Appropriation

$0
$0
$0
$0

Authority to Spend Offsetting Collections:
Regulatory Fees

$9,061
$11,090
$11,090
($0)
OIG Appropriation Total
$9,061
$11,090
$11,090
($0)

Authority to Spend
Other Off-setting Collections:
1) Economy Act/Misc. Other

$0
$0
$0
$0
2) Auctions Cost Recovery Reimbursements
135
505
519
14

OIG Other Offsetting Collections

$135
$505
$519
$14

OIG Total Budget Authority - Available to incur obligations

$9,195
$11,595
$11,609
$14

Other Budget Authority

Credit Program Account 1/
$0
$0
$0
$0
Universal Service Fund (USF) 2/
$1,956
$3,315
$4,130
$815

Total FCC with OIG

Appropriation Total
$322,504
$339,844
$375,380
$35,536

Other Offsetting Collections & Other Budget Authority

$104,403
$109,987
$116,630
$6,643

Total Budget Authority - Available to incur obligations

$426,907
$449,831
$492,010
$42,179
1/ Credit Program Account carryover amount.
2/ The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008 (P.L. 110-161) authorizes use of $21.5M to be used by the Office of the Inspector General for USF
Audit Support. In FY 2008 - FY 2013, $13.9M was obligated. The remaining $7.6M has been carried forward, as follows $3.3M is estimated to be
used in FY 2014 and $4.3M will be used in FY 2015.
- 67 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

Summary of Requested Resources

($ in Millions)

OUTLAYS:

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

FCC - Commission without Office of the Inspector
General:

New Offsetting Collections:

Regulatory Fees

$311
$346
$362

Auctions Receipts

99
97
105

Interagency/Other

3
6
6

Homeland Security

2
2
2

Subtotal, Outlays from new discretionary authority

$415
$451
$475

Outlays from prior year discretionary balances

0
0
0

SUBTOTAL OUTLAYS

$415
$451
$475

FCC - Office of the Inspector General:
New Offsetting Collections:

Regulatory Fees

$9
$11
$11

Auctions Receipts

0
1
1

Interagency/Other

0
0
0

Homeland Security

0
0
0

Subtotal, Outlays from new discretionary authority

$9
$12
$12

Outlays from prior year discretionary balances

0
0
0

OIG SUBTOTAL OUTLAYS

$9
$12
$12

TOTAL FCC with OIG OUTLAYS

$424
$463
$487


- 68 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

Summary of Requested Resources

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Actual

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

FCC - Commission without Office of the Inspector
General:

Total Compensable Workyears:
Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTEs)

1,681
1,689
1,738

Proposed Distribution:
Direct

0
0
0
Offsetting Collections
1,678
1,684
1,736
Auctions Credit Program Account
3
5
2

TOTAL FTE - Commission

1,681
1,689
1,738

FCC - Office of the Inspector General:
Total Compensable Workyears:
Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTEs)

42
46
52

Proposed Distribution:
Direct

0
0
0
Offsetting Collections
32
45
52
Auctions Credit Program Account
0
0
0
Universal Service Fund (USF) (Term)
10
1
0

TOTAL FTE - OIG

42
46
52

TOTAL FCC with OIG FTE

1,723
1,735
1,790


- 69 -




FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

SUMMARY TABLES

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

REGULATORY FEES - CURRENT:

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$184,852
$194,876
$203,691
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
49,095
50,527
55,105
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$233,947
$245,403
$258,797

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$24
$29
$30
Travel (21.0)
838
1,503
1,478
Transportation of Things (22.0)
75
128
130
GSA Rent (23.1)
37,266
38,977
39,604
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
5,695
5,514
5,626
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
1,013
1,032
1,049
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
16,673
21,737
25,024
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
2,354
3,385
3,439
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
21,159
15,668
32,681
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
1,343
1,833
1,864
Equipment (31.0)
2,110
4,634
5,618
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
7
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$88,557
$94,441
$116,543

Total Obligations from Regulatory Fees

$322,504
$339,844
$375,340

Total Resources from Regulatory Fees

$322,504
$339,844
$375,340

- 70 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

SUMMARY TABLES

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

AUCTIONS COST RECOVERY REIMBURSABLE AUTHORITY:

-- The following table depicts the distribution of the actual resources for FY 2013, Congressional Approved
for FY 2014, and estimated for FY 2015 obligations utilizing auctions cost recovery reimbursable authority.

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$26,357
$26,376
$29,533
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
7,035
6,223
7,009
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$33,392
$32,599
$36,542

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$4
$4
$4
Travel (21.0)
170
164
317
Transportation of Things (22.0)
7
10
10
GSA Rent (23.1)
6,844
8,108
6,954
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
2,821
1,550
2,858
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
157
156
158
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
11,280
19,577
22,000
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
330
329
335
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
41,296
31,458
31,962
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
158
275
280
Equipment (31.0)
2,191
4,499
4,571
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
0
10
10
Subtotal Other Expenses
$65,258
$66,140
$69,458

Total Auctions Cost Recovery

Reimbursable Obligations:

$98,650 1/
$98,739
$106,000
1/ The FCC received a Continuing Resolution Anomaly for FY 2013 in the amount of $13.7M for Auctions.



- 71 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

SUMMARY TABLES

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

GOVERNMENT/OTHER REIMBURSABLE AUTHORITY

-- The following table depicts the Economy Act/Other Reimbursable actual resources for FY 2013 and
estimated for FY 2014 and FY 2015.

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$230
$300
$300
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
65
100
100
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$295
$400
$400

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$0
$0
$0
Travel (21.0)
7
50
50
Transportation of Things (22.0)
0
0
0
GSA Rent (23.1)
0
0
0
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
0
0
0
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
0
0
0
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
1,046
2,700
2,700
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
0
0
0
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
1,594
2,500
2,500
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
33
50
50
Equipment (31.0)
252
300
300
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
1
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$2,932
$5,600
$5,600

Total Government/Other Reimbursable

Authority

$3,227
$6,000
$6,000


- 72 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

SUMMARY TABLES

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

CREDIT PROGRAM ACCOUNT:

-- The following table depicts the distribution of actual obligations from the Credit Program account for FY
2013 and estimated for FY 2014 and FY 2015. These obligations are presented in separate schedules
apart from the Salaries & Expenses account and funded from Permanent Indefinite Authority.

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$266
$277
$180
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
72
75
20
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$338
$352
$200

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$0
$0
$0
Travel (21.0)
0
0
0
Transportation of Things (22.0)
0
0
0
GSA Rent (23.1)
0
0
0
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
0
0
0
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
0
0
0
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
86
181
200
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
109
1,400
100
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
0
0
0
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
0
0
0
Equipment (31.0)
0
0
0
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
38
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$233
$1,581
$300

Total Credit Program

$571
$1,933
$500


- 73 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

SUMMARY TABLES

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

UNIVERSAL SERVICE FUND:

-- The following table depicts the distribution of obligations from the use of Universal Service Funds (USF)
for FY 2013, estimated for FY 2014 and FY 2015. These obligations are presented in separate
schedules apart from the Salaries & Expenses account and funded from amounts transferred from USF
in FY 2008, as permitted in appropriations language that year. No new budget authority was enacted in
FY 2014; carryover balances will be used for continued USF oversight by the Inspector General.

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$1,019
$100
$0
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
278
50
0
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$1,297
$150
$0

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$0
$0
$0
Travel (21.0)
5
10
5
Transportation of Things (22.0)
0
0
0
GSA Rent (23.1)
71
5
0
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
0
0
0
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
0
0
0
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
588
3,140
4,120
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
0
0
0
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
0
0
0
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
0
0
0
Equipment (31.0)
27
10
5
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
0
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$691
$3,165
$4,130

Total Universal Service Program 1/

$1,988
$3,315
$4,130
1/ The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008 (P.L. 110-161) authorizes use of $21.5M to be used by the Office of the
Inspector General for USF Audit Support. In FY 2008 - FY 2013, $13.9M was obligated. The remaining $7.6M has been
carried forward, as follows $3.3M is estimated to be used in FY 2014 and $4.3M will be used for FY 2015.


- 74 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

FCC SUMMARY TABLES (EXCLUDING OIG)

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

REGULATORY FEES - CURRENT (EXCLUDING OIG):

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$180,872
$189,376
$197,068
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
48,013
49,225
53,461
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$228,885
$238,601
$250,529

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$24
$29
$30
Travel (21.0)
813
1,406
1,428
Transportation of Things (22.0)
75
128
130
GSA Rent (23.1)
36,923
38,619
39,213
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
5,673
5,514
5,626
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
1,013
1,032
1,049
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
13,858
17,913
22,739
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
2,354
3,385
3,439
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
20,459
15,668
32,681
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
1,342
1,833
1,862
Equipment (31.0)
2,015
4,625
5,524
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
7
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$84,558
$90,153
$113,721

Total Obligations from Regulatory Fees

$313,443
$328,754
$364,250

Total Resources from Regulatory Fees

$313,443
$328,754
$364,250


- 75 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

FCC SUMMARY TABLES (EXCLUDING OIG)

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

AUCTIONS COST RECOVERY REIMBURSABLE AUTHORITY (EXCLUDING OIG):

-- The following table depicts the distribution of the estimated resources for FY 2013, Congressional Approved
for FY 2014, and estimated for FY 2015 obligations utilizing auctions cost recovery reimbursable authority.

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$26,357
$26,376
$29,533
Personnel Benefits (12.1)
7,035
6,223
7,009
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$33,392
$32,599
$36,542

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$4
$4
$4
Travel (21.0)
170
164
317
Transportation of Things (22.0)
7
10
10
GSA Rent (23.1)
6,844
8,108
6,954
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
2,821
1,550
2,858
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
157
156
158
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
11,146
19,086
21,495
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
330
329
335
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
41,296
31,458
31,962
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
158
275
280
Equipment (31.0)
2,191
4,486
4,558
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
0
10
10
Subtotal Other Expenses
$65,122
$65,635
$68,939

Total Auctions Cost Recovery

Reimbursable Obligations:

$98,514
$98,234 1/
$105,481
1/ The FCC received a Continuing Resolution Anomaly for FY 2013 in the amount of $13.7M for Auctions.


- 76 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

FCC SUMMARY TABLES (EXCLUDING OIG)

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

GOVERNMENT/OTHER REIMBURSABLE AUTHORITY (EXCLUDING OIG):

-- The following table depicts the Economy Act/Other Reimbursable estimated resources for FY 2013 and
estimated for FY 2014 and FY 2015.

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$230
$300
$300
Personnel Benefits (12.1)
66
100
100
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$296
$400
$400

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$0
$0
$0
Travel (21.0)
7
50
50
Transportation of Things (22.0)
0
0
0
GSA Rent (23.1)
0
0
0
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
0
0
0
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
0
0
0
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
1,046
2,700
2,700
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
0
0
0
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
1,594
2,500
2,500
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
33
50
50
Equipment (31.0)
252
300
300
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
0
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$2,931
$5,600
$5,600

Total Government/Other Reimbursable

Authority

$3,227
$6,000
$6,000



- 77 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

FCC SUMMARY TABLES (EXCLUDING OIG)

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

CREDIT PROGRAM ACCOUNT (EXCLUDING OIG):

-- The following table depicts the distribution of estimated obligations from the Credit Program account for FY
2013 and estimated for FY 2014 and FY 2015. These obligations are presented in separate schedules apart
from the Salaries & Expenses account and funded from Permanent Indefinite Authority.

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$266
$277
$180
Personnel Benefits (12.1)
72
75
20
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$337
$352
$200

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$0
$0
$0
Travel (21.0)
0
0
0
Transportation of Things (22.0)
0
0
0
GSA Rent (23.1)
0
0
0
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
0
0
0
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
0
0
0
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
86
181
200
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
109
1,400
100
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
0
0
0
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
0
0
0
Equipment (31.0)
0
0
0
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
39
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$234
$1,581
$300

Total Credit Program

$571
$1,933
$500

- 78 -




FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

FCC OIG SUMMARY TABLES

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

REGULATORY FEES - CURRENT (OIG):

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$3,980
$5,500
$6,624
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
1,082
1,302
1,644
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$5,061
$6,802
$8,268

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$0
$0
$0
Travel (21.0)
24
97
50
Transportation of Things (22.0)
0
0
0
GSA Rent (23.1)
343
358
391
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
22
0
0
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
0
0
0
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
2,815
3,824
2,285
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
0
0
0
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
700
0
0
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
0
0
2
Equipment (31.0)
95
9
94
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
0
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$3,999
$4,288
$2,822

Total Obligations from Regulatory Fees

$9,061
$11,090
$11,090

Total Resources from Regulatory Fees

$9,061
$11,090
$11,090


- 79 -




FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

FCC OIG SUMMARY TABLES

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

AUCTIONS COST RECOVERY REIMBURSABLE AUTHORITY (OIG):

-- The following table depicts the distribution of the estimated resources for FY 2013, Congressional
Approved for FY 2014, and estimated for FY 2015 obligations utilizing auctions cost recovery

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time/Part-time Permanent (11.0)
$0
$0
$0
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
0
0
0
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$0
$0
$0

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$0
$0
$0
Travel (21.0)
0
0
0
Transportation of Things (22.0)
0
0
0
GSA Rent (23.1)
0
0
0
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
0
0
0
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
0
0
0
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
135
491
505
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
0
0
0
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
0
0
0
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
0
0
0
Equipment (31.0)
0
14
14
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
0
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$135
$505
$519

Total Auctions Cost Recovery

Reimbursable Obligations:

$135 1/
$505
$519
1/ The FCC received a Continuing Resolution Anomaly for FY 2013 in the amount of $13.7M for Auctions.

Note:

The OIG has no reimbursable agreements. The OIG uses no Credit Reform Program Funds.


- 80 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

FCC OIG SUMMARY TABLES

DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES

($ in thousands)

UNIVERSAL SERVICE FUND (OIG):

-- The following table depicts the distribution of estimated obligations from the use of Universal Service
Funds (USF) for FY 2013, estimated for FY 2014 and FY 2015. These obligations are presented in
separate schedules apart from the Salaries & Expenses account and funded from amounts transferred
from USF in FY 2008, as permitted in appropriations language that year. No new budget authority was
enacted in FY 2014; carryover balances will be used for continued USF oversight by the Inspector
General.

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

Object Class Description

Actuals

Cong. Approp.

Cong. Request

Personnel Compensation & Benefits:

Full-time Temporary (11.0)
$1,019
$100
$0
Personnel Benefits (12.0)
278
50
0
Subtotal Personnel Comp. & Benefits
$1,297
$150
$0

Other Expenses:

Benefits for Former Personnel (13.0)
$0
$0
$0
Travel (21.0)
5
10
5
Transportation of Things (22.0)
0
0
0
GSA Rent (23.1)
71
5
0
Other Rents, Comm., Utilities (23.3)
0
0
0
Printing and Reproduction (24.0)
0
0
0
Contract Services - Non-Fed (25.2)
588
3,140
4,120
Fed. Purchase, Goods & Services (25.3)
0
0
0
Operation & Maint. of Equipment (25.7)
0
0
0
Supplies and Materials (26.0)
0
0
0
Equipment (31.0)
27
10
5
Land and Structures (32.0)
0
0
0
Insurance Claims & Indemnities (42.0)
0
0
0
Subtotal Other Expenses
$691
$3,165
$4,130

Total Universal Service Program 1/

$1,988
$3,315
$4,130
1/ The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008 (P.L. 110-161) authorizes use of $21.5M to be used by the Office of the
Inspector General for USF Audit Support. In FY 2008 - FY 2013, $13.9M was obligated. The remaining $7.6M has been
carried forward, as follows $3.3M is estimated to be used in FY 2014 and $4.3M will be used for FY 2015.


- 81 -





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800
575
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5,839
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1,290
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$17,096
$322,496
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784
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- 82 -



FY 2015 Budget Estimates to Congress

SUMMARY OF INCREASES BY BUDGET OBJECT CLASS CODE

($ in thousands)

Adjustment to

Inflationary

FY 2015 New

OC Description

Base Budget

Increase

Intiatives

11.00 Compensation
-- Pay Raise for FY 2014
$0
$1,725
$0
-- Staffing Adjustment
5,988
0
0
12.00 Benefits
-- Benefits associated with Pay Raise
0
433
0
-- Staffing Adjustment
1,622
0
0
-- Worker Compensation
0
1
0
-- FERS Increase
0
2,208
0
13.00 Benefits for Former Personnel
0
0
0
21.00 Travel and Transportation of Persons
-- Domestic/International/Joint Board Travel
0
21
0
-- Leased, Passenger Vehicles
0
1
0
22.00 Transportation of Things
0
2
0
23.00 Rents, Communications, Utilities
-- GSA Rent and Fees Increase: Portals I & II, and field offices
0
594
0
-- Non-GSA Space Rent
0
24
0
-- GSA and Non-GSA Telephones
0
46
0
-- M ail Service--Postage
0
7
0
-- GSA, Electric, Other Utilities
0
16
0
-- Telecommunications Service-Non-GSA
0
1
0
-- Other Equipment Rental/Copier Rental
0
18
0
24.00 Printing and Reproduction
0
17
0
25.00 Other Contractual S ervices
-- Contract Services - Federal & Non-Federal
3,500
272
1,000
-- ADP Data Retrieval Services
0
34
0
-- Training/Tuition/Fees; Gov't-wide training initiative
0
12
0
-- Contract Purchases-Federal
0
4
0
-- Interagency Contracts
0
45
0
-- Field Office Buildings and Grounds; Space Repair
0
4
0
-- Health Services
0
2
0
-- Repair/M aintenance of Vehicles
0
1
0
-- ADP Software/ADP Equip. M aintenance; ADP Service Contracts
4,397
248
12,365
-- Repair Office Equipment/Technical Equipment
0
2
0
26.00 S upplies and Materials
-- Field Fuel Supplies
0
2
0
-- Periodicals & Subscriptions
0
8
0
-- General Supplies and M aterials
0
19
0
31.00 Equipment
-- Technical Equipment
625
21
0
-- ADP Equipment
0
21
100
-- ADP Software
0
15
100
-- Equipment
0
2
0
-- Vehicle Purchase
0
13
0
-- Other Equipment
0
0
0
32.00 Lands and S tructures
0
0
0
42.00 Insurance Claims and Indemnities
0
0
0

TOTAL

$16,132
$5,839
$13,565

TOTAL INCREAS E

$35,536

- 83 -






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- 85 -






















EXHIBITS AND REPORTS















UNIVERSAL SERVICE FUND

Under the Telecommunications Act of 1996, telecommunications carriers that provide interstate and international telecommunications services
are required to contribute funds for the preservation and advancement of universal service. The contributions generally provided, in turn, by
each carrier's subscribers, are used to provide services eligible for universal service support as prescribed by the FCC. Interest income
on these funds is utilized to offset carrier contributions. Administrative costs of the program are provided from carrier contributions.
For budgetary purposes, the USF comprises five elements that consist of four universal service support mechanisms and the
Telecommunications Relay Service (TRS) Fund. The TRS Fund represents a program established under section 225 of the Act. This
statute provides for an mechanism to support relay services necessary for telecommunications access by speech or hearing impaired
populations.
Public Law 113-76 temporarily suspended the application of the Antideficiency Act to the Federal universal service fund programs authorized
under section 254 of the Communications Act of 1934, through December 31, 2015. The Antideficiency Act requires that funds be available
before incurring an obligation on behalf of the Federal Government.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

2013 Actual
2014 Est.
2015 Est.

Obligation by program activity:

0001
Universal service fund
$10,460
$11,619
$11,123
0002
Program support
112
141
148
0900
Total new obligations (object class 41.0)
$10,572
$11,760
$11,271

Budgetary resources

1000
Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year
$3,180
$3,339
$2,157
1021
Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations
923
806
603
1050
Unobligated balance (total)
$4,103
$4,145
$2,760

Budget authority:

M andatory:
1201.1
Appropriation (special fund)--Receipts
9,760
9,756
9,787
1201.2
Appropriation (special fund)--Interest
27
16
43
1260
Appropriation, mandatory (total)
$9,787
$9,772
$9,830

S pending authority from offsetting collections, mandatory:

1850
Collected (total)
$21
$0
$0
1900
Budget authority (total)
9,808
9,772
9,830
1930
Total budgetary resources available
$13,911
$13,917
$12,590
1941
Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year
$3,339
$2,157
$1,319

Change in obligated balances:

3000
Unpaid obligated balance, start of year
$3,492
$3,975
$4,963
3010
Obligation incurred, unexpired accounts
$10,572
$11,760
$11,271
3020
Total outlays (gross)
9,166
9,966
(10,384)
3040
Recoveries of prior year obligations
(923)
(806)
(603)
3050
Unpaid obligated balance, end of year (net)
$22,307
$24,895
$5,247
3100
Obligation balance, start of year
$3,492
$3,975
$4,963
3200
Obligation balance, end of year
$3,975
$4,963
$5,247

Budget authority and outlays net:

4090
Budget authority gross:
$9,808
$9,772
$9,830
4100
Outlays from new mandatory authority
4,762
5,473
5,715
4101
Outlays from new mandatory balances
4,404
4,493
4,669
87.00
Total outlays (net)
$9,166
$9,966
$10,384

Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays

4123
Offsetting collection from Non-Federal sources
($21)
$0
$0
4160
Budget authority net (mandatory)
$9,787
$9,772
$9,830
4170
Outlays net (mandatory)
$9,145
$9,966
$10,384

Memorandum (non-add) entries:

5000
Total investments, start of year: Federal securities: Par value
$6,541
$7,150
$7,150
5001
Total investments, end of year: Federal securities: Par value
7,150
7,150
7,150

- 86 -



SPECTRUM AUCTION PROGRAM ACCOUNT

This program provided direct loans for the purpose of purchasing spectrum licenses at the Federal Communications Commission's auctions.
The licenses were purchased on an installment basis, which constitutes an extension of credit. The first year of activity for this program was 1996.
As required by the Federal Credit Refom Act of 1990, this account records, for this program, the subsidy costs associated with the direct loans
obligated in 1992 and beyond (including modifications of direct loans or loan guarantees that resulted from obligations or commitments in any year),
as well as administrative expenses of this program. The subsidy amounts are estimated on a present value basis and administrative expenses are
estimated on a cash basis. The FCC no longer offers credit terms on purchases through spectrum auctions. Program activity relates to
maintenance and close-out of existing loans.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


2013 Actual
2014 Est.
2015 Est.

Obligations by program activity:

0709 Administrative Expenses
$1
$1
$1
0900 Total new obligations
$1
$1
$1

Budgetary resources available for obligation:

1000 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year
$4
$3
$4

Budget authority

1200 Appropriation, mandatory
$0
$2
$2
1260 Appropriation, mandatory (total)
$0
$2
$2
1930 Total budgetary resources available
$4
$5
$6

Memorandum (non-add) entries

1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year
$3
$4
$5

Change in obligated balances:

3000 Unpaid obligated balance, start of year
$0
$0
$0
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts
1
1
1
3020 Total outlays (gross)
(1)
(1)
(1)
3050 Unpaid obligation, end of year (gross)
$0
$0
$0

Budget authority and Outlays (net)

4090 Budget authority, gross
$0
$2
$2
Outlays, gross:
4100 Outlays from new mandatory authority
$0
$1
$1
4101 Outlays from mandatory balance
1
0
0
4110 Outlays gross (total)
$1
$1
$1
4160 Budget authority, net (mandatory)
$0
$2
$2
4170 Outlays, net (mandatory)
$1
$1
$1
4180 Budget authority, net (total)
$0
$2
$2
4190 Outlays, net (total)
$1
$1
$1



- 87 -



Summary of Loan levels, Subsidy Budget Authority and Outlays by Program (in millions of dollars)

2013 Actual
2014 Est.
2015 Est.

Direct loan upward reestimate:

1350 Spectrum auction
$18
$0
$0
1359 Total upward reestimate budget authority
0
0
0

Direct loan downward reestimate:

1370 Spectrum auction
0
0
0
1379 Total downward reestimate budget authority
0
0
0

Administrative expense data:

3510 Budget authority
1
1
1
3590 Outlays from new authority
1
1
1

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)

2013 Actual
2014 Est.
2015 Est.
1111 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent
$0
$1
$1
1252 Other services
0
1
0
1253 Other purch of goods & services from Government acct
0
2
1
1410 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
19
0
0
9999 Total new obligations
$19
$4
$2




- 88 -



SPECTRUM AUCTION DIRECT LOAN FINANCING ACCOUNT

As required by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, this non-budgetary account records all cash flows to and from the Government
resulting from direct loans obligated in 1992 and beyond (including modifications of direct loans that resulted from obligations in any year).
The amounts in this account are a means of financing and are not included in the budget totals.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


2013 Actual
2014 Est.
2015 Est.

Obligation by program activity:

Credit program obligations:

0713 Payement of interest to Treasury
$1
$10
$7
0900 Total new obligations
$1
$10
$7

Budgetary resources:

Unobligated balance:

1000 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year
$4
$6
$0

Financing authority :

Borrowing authority, mandatory:

1400 Borrowing authority
$1
$7
$7
1440 Borrowing authority, mandatory (total)
$1
$7
$7

Spending authority from offsetting collections, mandatory:

1800 Offseting collections
$4
$0
$0
1825 Spending authority from offsetting collections applied to repay debt
(1)
0
0
1850 Spending authority from offsetting collections, mandatory:
$3
$0
$0
1900 Financing authority (total)
$4
$7
$7
1930 Total budgetary resources avaialble
$8
$13
$7

Memorandum (non-add) entries:

1941 Unexpirsed unobligated balance, end of year
$6
$0
$0

Change in obligated balances:

3010 Obligation incurred, unexpired accounts
$2
$13
$7
3020 Financing disbursements (gross)
(2)
(7)
(7)

Financing authority and disbursements, net

4090 Financing authority, gross (mandatory)
($2)
$7
$7
4010 Financing disbursements, gross
$2
$7
$7
4160 Financing authority, net (mandory)
$0
$7
$7
4170 Financing disbursements, net (mandatory)
($2)
$7
$7
4180 Financing authority, net (total)
$0
$7
$7
4190 Financing disbursements, net (total)
($2)
$7
$7




- 89 -




Status of Direct Loans (in millions of dollars)

2013 Actual
2014 Est.
2015 Est.

Cumulative balance of direct loans outstanding:

1210 Outstanding, start of year
$112
$112
$88
1263 Write-offs for default: Direct loans
0
(24)
(24)
1264 Other adjustments, net(adjust to princ recoveries)
0
0
0
1290 Outstanding, end of year
$112
$88
$64


- 90 -


























RESPONSES TO CONGRESSIONAL INQUIRIES

CONCERNING GAO RECOMMENDATIONS












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Document Outline

  • Budget Cover
  • FY_2015_Final Budget 03 05 2014
    • Inflationary Increases to Base $5,839,312
    • Other Increase Base $16,132,000
    • New Program Performance Initiatives $13,565,000
    • CONNECT AMERICA
    • Regulatory Fees
  • ALL GAO Letters

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