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New York City Narrowbanding Waiver

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Released: December 26, 2012

Federal Communications Commission

DA 12-2078

Before the

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20554

In the Matter of
)
)

CITY OF NEW YORK
)
WT Docket No. 99-87
)
Request for Waiver of Section 90.209(b) of the
)
Commission’s Rules
)
)

ORDER

Adopted: December 26, 2012

Released: December 26, 2012

By the Deputy Chief, Policy and Licensing Division, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau and
Deputy Chief, Mobility Division, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau:

I.

INTRODUCTION

1. On June 13, 2012, the City of New York (the City) filed a request for waiver,1 on behalf of
the City's Police Department (NYPD), Fire Department (FDNY), Department of Corrections (DOC),
Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), and Department of Information Technology and
Telecommunications (DoITT), for a waiver of the Commission’s January 1, 2013 VHF-UHF
narrowbanding deadline, which requires private land mobile radio (PLMR) licensees in the 150-174 MHz
and 421-512 MHz bands to operate using channel bandwidth of no more than 12.5 kHz or equivalent
efficiency by January 1, 2013.2
2. The City seeks separate extension dates for two different components of its radio system:
·
The main portion of the UHF system used by FDNY and NYPD operates on frequencies in
the “T-Band” (470-512 MHz), for which the January 1, 2013 narrowbanding deadline has
previously been waived in the T-Band Narrowbanding Waiver Order.3 The City now seeks a
similar waiver for additional non-T-Band channels that are operationally integrated with the
T-Band systems.4
·
The City seeks a separate waiver until December 31, 2014 for certain other systems used by


1 Request for Waiver on Behalf of the City of New York of Commission Rules Regarding the Migration of Private
Mobile Land Radio Services to 12.5 kHz Or Narrower Technology by January 1, 2013, WT Docket 99-87 (filed Jun.
8, 2012) (Waiver Request).
2 See 47 C.F.R. § 90.209(b)(5); see also Implementation of Sections 309(j) and 337 of the Communications Act of
1934 as Amended; Promotion of Spectrum Efficient Technologies on Certain Part 90 Frequencies, Third
Memorandum Opinion and Order and Third Further Notice of Proposed Rule Making and Order
, WT Docket No.
99-87, RM-9332, 19 FCC Rcd 25045 (2004).
3 See Implementation of Sections 309(j) and 337 of the Communications Act of 1934 as Amended; Promotion of
Spectrum Efficient Technologies on Certain Part 90 Frequencies, Order, WT Docket No. 99-87, RM-9332, 27 FCC
Rcd 4213 (WTB/PSHSB/OET 2012) (T-Band Narrowbanding Waiver Order).
4 Waiver Request at Appendix A.

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FDNY, DEP, and DOC that are not integrated with the City’s T-Band systems.5
3. By this Order, we grant waiver relief with respect to both portions of the City’s request.
With respect to the non-T-Band channels used by FDNY and NYPD that are operationally integrated with
the T-Band systems, we extend the same waiver relief previously granted to the City’s T-Band facilities
pursuant to the T-Band Narrowbanding Waiver Order. With respect to DEP, we grant an extension until
May 1, 2013. We respect to the other systems used by FDNY and DOC, we grant a waiver until
December 31, 2014.

II.

BACKGROUND

4. New York City, with a population of more than 8 million residents, is among the most
densely populated areas of the U.S. The City's five boroughs comprise approximately 300 square miles of
land and are bordered by 600 miles of shoreline. The City also hosts a massive transportation
infrastructure for highway, rail, subways, airports, and harbors. Its diverse architecture, varied
topography, and intensive land use, plus the in-building, tunnels, below-ground and surrounding
waterway environments, present an extremely varied and challenging radio frequency (RF) environment
for effective wireless communications. Finally, the City faces heightened public safety and emergency
preparedness demands in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks and the damage caused by
Superstorm Sandy in October 2012.

A.

NYPD

5. NYPD is the largest municipal police force in the nation, responsible for policing over 300
square miles of land and all waterways within and around the City.6 It employs over 47,000 uniformed
officers and 14,804 civilians, all of whom utilize the NYPD radio system in the performance of their
duties.7 The NYPD radio system operates primarily in the T-Band and includes nearly 160 base station
repeaters, 1,400 receivers at more than 300 radio sites, and 130 Emergency Control Stations for
emergency wireless backup capability in the event of wired network failure.8
6. NYPD has made significant progress in narrowbanding its radio operations. It has converted
most of its voice channels from 25 kilohertz (kHz) analog to 12.5 kHz analog transmission, with some
channels being converted from 25 kHz analog to 12.5 kHz APCO Project 25 (P25) digital encrypted
channels. In addition, all of its equipment is dual-mode (i.e., can operate on both 25 and 12.5 kHz),
although it is currently operating in 25 kHz analog mode.9 NYPD’s only remaining task to complete
narrowbanding is the reprogramming of subscriber units.10
7. While NYPD has taken substantial steps towards narrowbanding, it is not currently subject to
a narrowbanding obligation with respect to its T-Band operations. In April 2012, in response to the
requirement in Section 6103 of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 (Public Safety


5 Id.
6 Waiver Request at 5.
7 Id. This includes 35,354 sworn police officers, 2,539 Traffic Enforcement Agents, 4,954 School Safety Agents,
and 4,369 Auxiliary Police Officers. See id.
8 Id. at 6.
9 Id. at 7. See also Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, Public Safety & Homeland Security Bureau, & Office of
Engineering & Technology Provide Reminder of January 1, 2013 Deadline for Transition to Narrowband Operations
in the 150-174 MHz & 421-512 MHz Bands & Guidance for Submission of Requests for Waiver & Other Matters,
Public Notice,
26 FCC Rcd 9647 (2011).
10 Waiver Request at 7-8.
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Spectrum Act) to clear T-Band public safety frequencies for eventual sale by competitive bidding,11 the
Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, and Office of
Engineering and Technology issued the T-Band Narrowbanding Waiver Order, which waived the January
1, 2013 narrowbanding deadline for all T-Band frequencies.12 Because NYPD operates primarily on T-
Band channels, the City notes that the T-Band waiver resulted in “only a small subset” of non-T-Band
frequencies used by NYPD remaining subject to the narrowbanding mandate.13 The City further notes
that these non-T-Band channels – most of which are low-power tactical channels – are operationally
integrated with the T-Band channels for which a waiver has been granted.14
8. The City argues that in light of the T-Band waiver, the underlying purpose of narrowbanding
would not be served if applied to the NYPD’s non-T-Band channels. It contends that the “intent of the
narrowband mandate is to provide additional channels within the land mobile radio bands to
accommodate prospective licensees” and that since the low-power tactical channels used by the NYPD
are spaced 12.5 kHz from incumbent 25 kHz licensees, “no new channels will become available for
prospective licensees regardless of whether the NYPD narrowbands their low power tactical channels in
the 450-470 MHz band.”15
9. The City further argues that strict application of the deadline to NYPD’s non-T-Band
channels would be contrary to the public interest, because “[n]arrowbanding interstitial point-to-point
tactical channels will result in a loss of range, degrading operational capability and potentially
compromising officer safety.”16 It further insists that “[s]ince these channels are dynamically assigned
and are used in the absence of a supporting network, infrastructure modifications or enhancements cannot
remedy the problem.”17
10. Moreover, the City contends that programming both T-Band and non-T-Band tactical
channels into the same radio with 25 and 12.5 kHz channel bandwidths, respectively, would result in
different coverage patterns that could compromise officer safety, as officers would likely be unaware of
the coverage disparity and how to differentiate between wideband and narrowband tactical channels on a
radio that can utilize both.18 The City also cites technical issues and operational problems arising from
digital modulation in radios engaged in unit-to-unit tactical communications.19
11. The City also claims that “[t]he continued use of 450-470 MHz, 25 kHz low-power interstitial
tactical channels within the geographic limits of the City of New York will not impact any other licensee”
and that “since all other network channels used by the NYPD are T-Band channels, which have been
exempted from the narrowband waiver, the requirement to narrowband three network channels places an
undue burden on the NYPD, both from a financial and a technical perspective.”20 Challenged by a
persistent fiscal crisis, the City argues that it would be imprudent to undertake the cost of narrowbanding


11 Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012, 47 U.S.C.A. § 1413 (West).
12T-Band Narrowbanding Waiver Order, 27 FCC Rcd 4213 (WTB/PSHSB/OET 2012).
13 Waiver Request at 8-9.
14 Id at 12.
15 Id. at 9.
16 Id. At 9-10.
17 Id.
18 Id.
19 Id.
20 Id. at 10-11 (emphasis omitted).
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operations that will subsequently need to move to a different frequency range.21 The City also highlights
its unique RF environment, noting that “loss of coverage due to narrowbanding is particularly acute in
tactical or point-to-point applications since there is no infrastructure that can be modified to compensate
for coverage loss.” 22
12. Finally, the City contends that “[c]ontinuing to provide uniform coverage and avoiding a
time-consuming and expensive re-programming effort, which would ultimately be unnecessary due to the
relocation of the T-Band, would be consistent with the purpose of the T-Band Waiver.”23 Accordingly, to
allow the NYPD to maintain its 25 kHz radio air interface technology on non-T-Band as well as T-Band
channels, the City seeks a waiver on behalf of NYPD until two years after completion of competitive
bidding for reallocated T-Band public safety channels pursuant to the Public Safety Spectrum Act. 24

B.

FDNY

13. FDNY provides fire protection and emergency medical services (EMS) to the City’s residents
and visitors, with more than 200 firehouses, thirty EMS stations, and 2,000 vehicles.25 It uses various
frequencies and types of subscriber equipment, including over 8,700 portable radios, 3,000 mobile radios,
and hundreds of base stations through the City.26
14. FDNY Subway Radio Channels. FDNY supports fire ground operations with a variety of
radio systems for voice communications by FDNY personnel in different environments. These systems
use T-Band channels for dispatch, tactical point-to-point radio communications, and in-building repeaters,
and use non-T-Band channels for amplifiers to extend coverage into the City’s subway system.27 FDNY
is also in the process of transitioning its legacy operations onto a T-Band simulcast system and a T-Band
trunked radio system.28 While the new T-Band systems are narrowband-capable, FDNY is operating its
simulcast system in wideband mode to allow seamless operation with legacy systems that have not been
transitioned, including the non-T-band subway channels.29 Because of the interdependency between the
T-Band simulcast system and the non-T-Band-subway channels, the city seeks a waiver on behalf of
FDNY to allow continued wideband operation of the subway channels until two years after the
completion of competitive bidding for the reallocated T-Band public safety channels.30
15. Other FDNY Channels. FDNY also utilizes certain UHF and VHF channels that are not
integrated with its T-Band operations.31 The City states that FDNY has made progress toward


21 Id. at 11.
22 Id. The City emphasizes the dense urban environment of New York City, and notes that the NYPD “responds to a
great number of emergency calls requiring Officers to enter large buildings, and therefore particularly concerned
with indoor radio coverage.”
23 Id. at 12.
24 Id. at 12.
25 Id. at 13.
26 Id.
27 Id. at 14
28 Id.. FDNY has partnered with DoITT to launch the simulcast system for fire and EMS dispatch and the trunked
radio system, which serves FDNY and other City agencies.
29 Id. at 17.
30 Id.
31 Id. at 13-14. These include VHF dispatch channels and UHF EMS channels. See Appendix A.
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narrowbanding these channels: it has identified which subscribers are reprogrammable, has purchased
software and upgrades for reprogrammable equipment and new equipment for those that could not be
upgraded, has completed the transition to narrowband for all municipal EMS ambulances and officer
response vehicles, as well as replaced all portable subscriber units used by municipal EMS personnel.32
16. Nevertheless, the City contends that FDNY requires an extension until December 31, 2014 to
complete narrowbanding of these operations, particularly its EMS MED system for medical telemetry
devices that enables EMS technicians to communicate in real time with a physician in critical moments
during emergency response.33 The City emphasizes that “the FDNY-owned EMS MED equipment
provides a reliable communications path [for medical telemetry], especially at scenes where cellphone
connections become unavailable.”34 Because most existing FDNY EMS MED equipment is not
narrowband-capable, FDNY is in the process of replacing that equipment. The City notes, however, that
some facilities that must be narrowbanded are outside FDNY’s control.35 In particular, certain systems
that operate on FDNY’s behalf are owned and maintained by others, including the NYC Subway
Underground Radio System,36 Volunteer Emergency Service Provider system(s),37 and Voluntary
Hospital Service Provider system(s).38 The City contends that the separate ownership and operation of
these facilities has prevented FDNY from obtaining public grant funding to support their narrowbanding
and therefore requires FDNY to provide direct funding in spite of a persistently bad fiscal climate. In light
of these challenges, FDNY anticipates that it will need until December 31, 2014 to complete


32 Id. at 14.
33 Id. at 15.
34 Id., citing http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2011/08/26/cell-phone-outage-concerns-rise-as-hurricane-irene-barrels-up-
east-coast/ (last accessed Nov. 30, 2012);
http://www.cio.com/article/127901/Minneapolis_Bridge_Collapse_Why_Cellular_Service_Goes_Down_During_Di
sasters?page=1&taxonomyld=3061 (last accessed Nov. 30, 2012).
35 Id. at 16.
36 The City’s Transit Authority (NYCTA) hosts an underground radio system that includes FDNY’s Fire Operation
and EMS channels, provides coverage throughout the subway system, and maintains and operates equipment on
behalf of FDNY. The network is a series of systems, each with its own base stations, signal boosters, and related
equipment. The FDNY’s Fire Operations operate on two channels and uses NYCTA’s narrowband-capable
equipment, and the City argues that “the FDNY’s fire ground operations must remain intact at 25 kHz as these two
subway channels are integral to all other T-Band frequencies including dispatch (T-Band UHF), citywide fire
ground point-to-point radio (T-Band UHF) as well as all other in-building repeaters (T-Band UHF).” NYCTA was
granted a waiver of the Commission’s deadline until June 30, 2016. See id. at 16-17. See also In the Matter of New
York City Transit Authority, Order, WT Docket No. 99-87, 27 FCC Rcd 8964 (2012).
37 FDNY has volunteer ambulance corps (VAC) and volunteer fire departments (VFD) to supplement the City’s 911
services. Like FDNY’s use of NYCTA’s underground system, VACs and VFDs use equipment not necessarily
owned by FDNY but that operates on FDNY channels. FDNY makes recommendations to each affected entity
about how best to proceed toward narrowband compliance. Though FDNY assists financially when possible, each
VAC and VFD relies on donations to fund and support operations and are each responsible for purchasing FDNY-
recommended equipment. FDNY states that these groups could achieve narrowband compliance if given an
extension to December 31, 2014. See id. at 18.
38 Voluntary hospital service providers (Voluntaries) are for-profit ambulance companies that assist FDNY with 911
response services, support hospitals in the city and provide up to one-third of the City’s ambulances. Each Voluntary
is required to purchase and maintain FDNY-recommended subscriber equipment, but many also face financial
difficulties with procurement. FDNY estimates that narrowbanding could be complete for Voluntaries by December
31, 2014. See id at 18-19.
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narrowbanding of these systems.39

C.

DEP

17. The DEP manages the City’s water supply, collects and treats 1.3 billion gallons of
wastewater produced daily, and regulates air quality, hazardous waste, and quality of life issues.40 In
order to narrowband, the DEP plans to replace localized UHF repeater systems at fourteen DEP water
treatment plants and has determined that 75 percent of its portable radios and 62.5 percent of its repeaters
need replacement.41 The City has further decided to take this opportunity to standardize all plant
operations and transition to digital operations in one streamlined project.42 The City states that DEP “has
been working diligently to meet the narrowband mandate but has encountered many difficulties in its
efforts to meet the January 1, 2013 deadline.”43 However, the City has submitted a timetable and seeks an
extension of the deadline to December 31, 2014 to narrowband DEP’s radio infrastructure.44

D.

DOC

18. The DOC operates and manages fifteen inmate facilities, two hospital prison wards, and a
number of holding facilities for the Criminal, Supreme, and Family Courts for each City borough,
handling over 100,000 admissions each year and managing roughly 14,000 inmates on a daily basis.45 On
most weekdays the DOC logs over 3,000 miles transporting inmates to courts or other medical or jail
facilities through the City and State.46 Most of DOC’s facilities are found in the Rikers Island complex,
which houses ten different jails. Outside of Rikers Island, the DOC operates four jail facilities, sixteen
court detention facilities, and three hospital wards throughout Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn, and the
Bronx, with a combined capacity of approximately 3,000 detainees facing or currently in trial.47
19. The DOC holds radio licenses for several UHF frequencies used at Rikers Island and
throughout the five Boroughs.48 After an inventory analysis, the DOC found that it needs to purchase
1,500 portable radios and 43 repeaters to be fully narrowband compliant.49 Though it has commenced the
procurement process and is already installing and programming repeaters at several facilities, the City
says that the DOC has encountered “unanticipated resource constraints, as well as complex migration
issues in the unusually difficult New York City wireless transmission and reception environment,” taking
longer than DOC anticipated in migrating radio users to narrowband operation.50 The DOC seeks an
extension of the narrowband deadline to December 31, 2014.
20. On August 17, 2012, the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau and the Public Safety and


39 Id at 19-20.
40 Id. at 20.
41 Id.
42 Id.
43 Id.
44 Id.
45 Id.
46 Id.
47 Id. at 21-22.
48 Id. at 22.
49 Id.
50 Id.
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Homeland Security Bureau issued a Public Notice seeking comment on the City’s waiver request.51 No
parties submitted comments in this proceeding.

III.

DISCUSSION

21. Section 1.925 of the Commission’s Rules states that in order to obtain a waiver of the
Commission’s Rules, a petitioner must demonstrate either that (i) the underlying purpose of the rule(s)
would not be served or would be frustrated by application to the present case, and that a grant of the
waiver would be in the public interest;52 or (ii) in view of unique or unusual factual circumstances of the
instant case, application of the rule(s) would be inequitable, unduly burdensome, or contrary to the public
interest or the applicant has no reasonable alternative.53
22. Applying this standard to narrowbanding, we have stated in the Narrowbanding Waiver
Guidance Notice, jointly issued by the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, the Public Safety and
Homeland Security Bureau, and the Office of Engineering and Technology, that narrowbanding waiver
requests “will be subject to a high level of scrutiny” under the waiver standard.54 We have also provided
recommended guidance on the factors that licensees should address in their requests and have
recommended that in addressing these factors, licensees should seek to demonstrate that “(i) they have
worked diligently and in good faith to narrowband their systems expeditiously; (ii) their specific
circumstances warrant a temporary extension of the deadline; and (iii) the amount of time for which a
waiver is requested is no more than is reasonably necessary to complete the narrowbanding process.”55

A.

Non-T-Band Frequencies Integrated With T-Band Frequencies

23. We first address the City’s request to waive the narrowbanding deadline with respect to non-
T-Band channels used by NYPD and FDNY that are integrated with their T-Band systems. As a result of
Section 6103 of the Public Safety Spectrum Act, NYPD and FDNY must eventually relocate their T-Band
operations to alternative spectrum. In light of this statutory requirement, the T-Band Narrowbanding
Waiver Order
held that enforcing the narrowbanding deadline in the T-Band would be inequitable and
contrary to the public interest.56
24. Although in the T-Band Narrowbanding Waiver Order, we indicated that T-Band licensees
that also operate on non T-band were required to meet the narrowbanding deadline with respect to those
non-T-band frequencies, we conclude that in this instance the waiver relief granted by the T-Band
Narrowbanding Waiver Order
should also be extended to the non-T-Band channels identified by NYPD
and FDNY. The record indicates that while these non-T-Band-channels are operationally integrated into


51 Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau Seeks Comment on Requests for Waiver of the Dec. 31, 2016 700
MHz Narrowbanding Deadline filed by the City of New York, Public Notice, DA 12-1345, 27 FCC Rcd 9606 (rel.
Aug. 17, 2012).
52 47 C.F.R. § 1.925(b)(3)(i).
53 47 C.F.R. § 1.925(b)(3)(ii).
54 Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, and Office of Engineering
and Technology Provide Reminder of January 1, 2013 Deadline for Transition to Narrowband Operations in the
150-174 MHz and 421-512 MHz Bands and Guidance for Submission of Requests for Waiver and Other Matters,
Public Notice, 26 FCC Rcd 9647 (2011) (Narrowbanding Waiver Guidance Notice); see also Wireless
Telecommunications Bureau and Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau Provide Supplemental Guidance for
Licensees in the 150-174 and 421-512 MHz Bands Seeking Waivers of the January 1, 2013 Narrowbanding
Deadline, Public Notice, 27 FCC Rcd 1936 (WTB/PSHSB 2012).
55 Narrowbanding Waiver Guidance Notice, 26 FCC Rcd at 9649.
56 T-Band Narrowbanding Waiver Order, 27 FCC Rcd at 4214-4215.
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NYPD and FDNY’s T-Band systems, they only represent a small subset of the total channels in use in
these systems.57 Thus, strict application of the narrowbanding requirement to the non-T-Band channels
while leaving the T-Band channels in wideband mode could significantly disrupt the operation of critical
public safety systems, without freeing up a significant amount of spectrum, a result which does not
promote efficient spectrum use and therefore would not serve the underlying purpose of the rule. Finally,
there is no evidence that NYPD’s and FDNY’s continued use of non-T-Band channels within the
geographic limits of the City will negatively impact any other licensee. For all of these reasons, we
conclude that a grant of the waiver is in the public interest.
25. We modify the waiver requested by the City in one respect. The City asks for an extension
of the narrowbanding deadline until two years after the Commission completes the competitive bidding
process required by Section 6103 of the Public Safety Spectrum Act for public safety frequencies in the
T-Band.58 We decline to do so, as this date has not yet been determined. Instead, we grant waiver relief
co-extensive with the relief previously granted by the T-Band Narrowbanding Waiver Order.59

B.

Other Frequencies

26. We also grant relief with respect to the remaining part of the waiver request, seeking an
extension of the narrowband deadline for FDNY VHF dispatch and UHF medical telemetry channels and
the channels used by DOC until December 31, 2014. With respect to the FDNY channels, we find that
the requested relief is warranted under the second prong of our waiver standard. Furthermore, the record
shows that FDNY has made significant progress toward narrowbanding these channels and has provided a
clear timeline for completion.
27. Similarly, we find that the requested relief is warranted for the DOC channels in light of the
City’s uniquely challenging RF environment, combined with public safety concerns in maintaining the
stability of correctional facilities and waste management, present circumstances that make the strict
application of the deadline unduly burdensome and inequitable. We also place significant weight on the
fact that DOC has worked diligently and in good faith to narrowband its systems expeditiously, as
evidenced by clear timelines and the work that has been done to date toward narrowband compliance.
Therefore, with respect to all FDNY and DOC channels identified in this portion of the City’s waiver
request, we find that the requested two year extension is reasonable under the circumstances, and
therefore grant a waiver of the narrowbanding deadline until December 31, 2014.
28. With regard to the DEP channels, we find that DEP has not shown sufficient evidence to
warrant relief until December 31, 2014. We note that the DEP states that under its current schedule it will
complete its narrowbanding transition by May 1, 2013.60 We have requested licensees to demonstrate the
amount of time for which a waiver is requested is no more than is reasonably necessary to complete the
narrowbanding process.61 The record is silent as to why DEP requires an additional 19 months of
wideband operation after the conclusion of its narrowbanding transition. We therefore will grant DEP a


57 Id at 8.
58 Waiver Request at 17, Appendix A.
59 T-Band Narrowbanding Waiver Order, 27 FCC Rcd at 4215 ¶7 (“Specifically, we waive the requirement that
Industrial/Business and Public Safety Radio Pool licensees in the 470-512 MHz band migrate to 12.5 kHz channel
bandwidth or utilize a technology that achieves equivalent efficiency by January 1, 2013 … The Commission will
consider how long this waiver relief should remain in effect once it takes further steps that clarify the status of
incumbent T-Band licensees.”).
60 Waiver Request at 21.
61 Narrowbanding Waiver Guidance Notice at 9649.
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waiver of the narrowbanding deadline only until May 1, 2013. If DEP needs additional time beyond that,
it must, in advance of the expiration of this extension, file a request for further extension that
demonstrates that the additional amount of time requested is no more than is reasonably necessary.

IV.

ORDERING CLAUSES

29. Accordingly, IT IS ORDERED pursuant to Section 4(i) of the Communications Act of 1934,
as amended, 47 U.S.C. § 154(i), and Section 1.925(b)(3) of the Commission’s rules, 47 C.F.R. §
1.925(b)(3), that the Request for Extension of Narrowbanding Deadline, filed on June 13, 2012 by the
City of New York IS GRANTED to the extent specified in this order.
30. This action is taken under delegated authority pursuant to Sections 0.191 and 0.392 of the
Commission’s rules, 47 C.F.R. §§ 0.191, 0.392.
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
Zenji Nakazawa
Deputy Chief, Policy and Licensing Division
Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau
Scot Stone
Deputy Chief, Mobility Division
Wireless Telecommunications Bureau
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APPENDIX

Waiver Request Date #1:

We grant waiver relief co-extensive with the relief previously granted by the
T-Band Narrowbanding Waiver Order for the following call signs and frequencies

NYPD UHF

450-470 MHz Frequency Licenses
(FRN 0003462421)
Frequency Call Signs
453.825
KQP434; K5I296
453.950
KQP434
453.250
KEH307; WJC79
KQP434; KQP434; K5I296 KQP434; K5I296
458.825
KQP434; 458.950 KQP434
458.250
KJ7505; WJC79; WJC80; WJC81; WJC82; WJC 83
460.525
WQNA692
465.525
WQNA692
(FRN 0003462512)

NYPD Tactical UHF 450 — 470 MHz Channels

Frequency Call Signs
465.1125
WBPQ 332
465.1875
WBPQ 332; WPKY 646
465.2375
WBPQ 332
465.3125
WBPQ 332
465.4625
WBPQ 332
465.4875
WBPQ 332
460.1125
WBPQ 332
460.1875
WBPQ 332; WPKY 646
460.2375
WBPQ 332; WPKY 646
460.3125
WBPQ 332
460.4625
WBPQ 332
460.4875
WBPQ 332
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(FRN 0003462512)

FDNY Subway Radio UHF 450 — 470 MHz Channels

FDNY-SUBWAY 1 RPT
460.5750 KY8033, KL0329-332
FDNY-SUBWAY 2 RPT
460.6250 KY8033, KL0329-332
FDNY-SUBWAY 1 RPT-MO 465.5750 KY8033
FDNY-SUBWAY 2 RPT-MO 465.6250 KY8033
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Waiver Request Date #2:

We grant relief of the narrowbanding deadline until December 31, 2014 for
the following frequencies and call signs.
(FRN 0003462512)

FDNY Dispatch VHF Channels 150 - 174 MHz Channels

KEB527, KED962, KYE994, KEB523,
154.1900 KEB524, KEB525, KEB526,
KEB523, KEB524, KEB525, KEB526,
154.2500 KEB527, KED962, KYE994
KEB523, KEB524, KEB525, KEB526,
154.3700 KEB527, KED962, KYE994
KEB523, KEB524, KEB525, KEB526,
154.4000 KEB527, KED962, KYE994
KEB523, KEB524, KEB525, KEB526,KEB527,
154.4300 KED962, KYE994, KV2288,WNJG268, WN5U962
154.8300 KV2288, WPFS461
154.0700 KV2288
154.0100 KV2288
153.9500 KV2288
153.7700 KV2288
153.8900 KV2288
(FRN 0003462512)

FDNY UHF MED Channels 450 - 470 MHz Channels

KA3875, KGC452, KKL715, KUN595,
MED 1
463.000/468.000
KUN596, KUN597, KUN598, WRU931
KA3875, KGC452, KKL715, KUN595,
MED 2
463.025/468.025
KUN596, KUN597, KUN598, WRU931
KA3875, KGC452, KKL715, KUN595,
MED 3
463.050/468.050
KUN596, KUN597, KUN598, WRU931
KA3875, KGC452, KKL715, KUN595,
MED 4
463.075/468.075
KUN596, KUN597, KUN598, WRU931
KA3875, KGC452, KKL715, KUN595
MED 5
463.100/468.100 ,KUN596, KUN597, KUN598, WRU931
KA3875, KGC452, KKL715, KUN595,
MED 6
463.125/468.125
KUN596, KUN597, KUN598, WRU931
KA3875, KGC452, KKL715, KUN595,
MED 7
463.150/468.150
KUN596, KUN597, KUN598, WRU931
KGC452, KKL715, KMB268, KUN595,
MED 8
463.175/468.175
KUN596, KUN597, KUN598, WRU933
KGC452, KKL715, KMB268, KUN595,
MED 9
462.950/467.950
KUN596, KUN597, KUN598, WRU933
12

Federal Communications Commission

DA 12-2078

KGC452, KKL715, KMB268, KUN595,
MED 10 462.975/467.975
KUN596, KUN597, KUN598, WRU933
13

Federal Communications Commission

DA 12-2078

(FRN 0003462512)

DOC UHF Jail Channels 450 — 470 MHz Channels

155.310/.370/.520
KB21980
155.5950
WYC886, WYC876, WYC877, WYC878,
WYC879, KA35345
158.9100
KB76551
453.1000
KJV315 through 318
453.7500
KF0831, KJV301, KJV303, WNJM507
458.100/.175/.200/.300 KH9216
453.2125/458.2125
WPKY646
453.3625/453.3625
WPKY646
453.4125/458.4125
WPKY646
460.3625/465.3625
WPKY646, WPGA632
460.1250/465.1250
WNYF842
460.4125/465.4125
WNY1442
453.4875/458.4875
KD41458, WQAA847
453.5125/458.5125
KD41458, WQAA847
453.5375/458.5375
KD41458, WQAA847
453.0625/458.0625
KD41458, WQAA847
453.3125/458.3125
KD41458, WQAA847
453.2625/458.2625
KD41458, WQAA847
460.0375/465.0375
WNY1446

Waiver Request Date #3:

We grant relief of the narrowbanding deadline until May 1, 2013 for the
following frequencies and call signs.
(FRN 0003462512)

DEP UHF Water Treatment Channels 450 — 470 MHz Channels

451.1625/456.1625
WNYZ288
451.1625/456.1625
WNYY401
451.4125
WPIB472
453.2000/453.2000
WNMC275
453.6625/458.6625;458.7625 WQGY510
458.2250
WPGV747
458.2500
WYR2549
458.2250
WPDC661
453.6125/458.6125
WNUZ671
KCT611, KDB505, KGV249, KJC708,
453.9000/458.9000
KWI649, KXM866, KXM867
14

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