Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

The Freedom of Information Act, commonly known as the FOIA, was enacted by Congress in 1966 to give the American public greater access to the federal government's records. The Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendments of 1996 expanded the scope of the FOIA to encompass electronic records and require the creation of "electronic reading rooms" to make records more easily and widely available to the public.

FCC Freedom of Information Act Annual Reports

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Ex Parte

The ex parte rules specify three types of Commission proceedings for ex parte purposes -- (i) "exempt" proceedings, in which ex parte presentations may be made freely, (ii) "permit-but-disclose" proceedings, in which ex parte presentations to Commission decision-making personnel are permissible but subject to certain disclosure requirements (i.e., a copy of written presentations and a summary of oral presentations must be filed in the record), and (iii) "restricted" proceedings, in which ex parte presentations to and from Commission decision-making personnel are generally prohibited (i.e., written materials must generally be served on all parties and all parties must have an opportunity to be present at oral presentations).

Ex Parte Presentations

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