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WRC-07 Implementation

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Released: November 19, 2012

Federal Communications Commission

FCC 12-140

Before the

Federal Communications Commission

Washington, D.C. 20554

In the Matter of
)
)
Amendment of Parts 1, 2, 15, 74, 78, 87, 90, and 97
)
of the Commission’s Rules Regarding
)
Implementation of the Final Acts of the World
)
ET Docket No. 12-338
Radiocommunication Conference (Geneva, 2007)
)
(WRC-07), Other Allocation Issues, and Related
)
Rule Updates
)

NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULEMAKING AND ORDER

Adopted: November 15, 2012

Released: November 19, 2012

Comment Date: [60 days after date of publication in the Federal Register]
Reply Comment Date: [90 days after date of publication in the Federal Register]

By the Commission:

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Heading
Paragraph #
I.
INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................. 1
II. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................................... 2
III. BACKGROUND .................................................................................................................................... 5
A. Allocation Table............................................................................................................................... 5
B. Procedural Background.................................................................................................................... 9
IV. NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULEMAKING ........................................................................................ 13
A. LF (30 to 300 kHz) and MF (300 to 3000 kHz) Allocations ......................................................... 13
1. New Amateur Service Band (135.7-137.8 kHz)...................................................................... 13
2. Amateur 160 Meter Band (1800-2000 kHz)............................................................................ 20
B. VHF (30 to 300 MHz) Allocations ................................................................................................ 25
1. Additional Aeronautical Use of 108-117.975 MHz ................................................................ 25
2. VHF Maritime Mobile Band (156-162 MHz) ......................................................................... 30
a. 156.4875-156.5625 MHz .................................................................................................. 30
b. Automatic Identification System (AIS) ............................................................................ 39
C. UHF (300 to 3000 MHz) Allocations ............................................................................................ 42
1. Radiolocation Use of 420-450 MHz........................................................................................ 42
2. Mobile Meter Reading Use of 928-960 MHz.......................................................................... 44
3. Additional Aeronautical Use of 960-1164 MHz ..................................................................... 45
4. Feeder Link Allocations near 1.4 GHz.................................................................................... 52
5. Aeronautical Mobile Telemetry Use of 2310-2320 MHz and 2345-2360 MHz ..................... 56
D. SHF (3 to 30 GHz) Allocations...................................................................................................... 59
1. Radio Astronomy Observatories in the 4 and 14 GHz Bands ................................................. 59
2. 5091-5150 MHz....................................................................................................................... 61
a. New Aeronautical Mobile Service Band........................................................................... 61
b. Updating Service Rules for Aviation Services.................................................................. 68
3. Radiolocation and Active Sensors in the 9-10 GHz Range..................................................... 78
4. Satellite and Fixed Use of 17.7-20.2 GHz............................................................................... 88

Federal Communications Commission

FCC 12-140

5. Meteorological Satellite Use of 18-18.1 GHz ......................................................................... 97
6. Deletion of Radionavigation Service Allocation from 24.75-25.05 GHz ............................. 101
E. Radio Astronomy Observatories in the 81-95 GHz Range .......................................................... 105
F. Protection of Passive Sensors from Active Service Operations................................................... 107
1. Protection of the EESS (passive) from Unwanted Emissions ............................................... 108
2. Protection of Passive Sensors Receiving in Active Service Bands ....................................... 138
a. 10.6-10.68 GHz............................................................................................................... 139
b. 36-37 GHz....................................................................................................................... 151
G. Other Matters ............................................................................................................................... 156
V. ORDER............................................................................................................................................... 158
VI. PROCEDURAL MATTERS.............................................................................................................. 172
A. Notice of Proposed Rulemaking .................................................................................................. 172
1. Ex Parte ................................................................................................................................. 172
2. Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis .................................................................................. 173
3. Paperwork Reduction Act Analysis....................................................................................... 174
4. Filing Requirements .............................................................................................................. 175
B. Order ............................................................................................................................................ 178
1. Paperwork Reduction Act...................................................................................................... 178
2. Congressional Review Act .................................................................................................... 179
3. Accessible Formats................................................................................................................ 180
VII. ORDERING CLAUSES.................................................................................................................... 181
APPENDIX A – Glossary of Frequently Used Radiocommunication Service Terms
APPENDIX B – New and Renumbered Domestic Footnotes
APPENDIX C – Land Mobile Operations in the 156.4875-156.5625 MHz Band
APPENDIX D – Proposed Rules
APPENDIX E – Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis
APPENDIX F – Final Rules

I.

INTRODUCTION

1. By this action, we propose to amend Parts 1, 2, 74, 78, 87, 90, and 97 of the Commission’s
rules to implement allocation decisions from the World Radiocommunication Conference (Geneva, 2007)
(WRC-07) concerning portions of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum between 108 MHz and 20.2 GHz
and to make certain updates to our rules in this frequency range.1 This Notice of Proposed Rulemaking
(Notice) follows the Commission’s July 2010 WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order,2 which made certain
non-substantive, editorial revisions to the Table of Frequency Allocations (Allocation Table) and to other
related rules.3 We also address the recommendations for implementation of the WRC-07 Final Acts that
the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) submitted to the Commission
in August 2009.4 As part of our comprehensive review of the Allocation Table, we also propose to make


1 International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Final Acts of the World Radiocommunication Conference (Geneva,
2007) (WRC-07 Final Acts), available for purchase at http://www.itu.int/publ/R-ACT-WRC.8-2007/en.
2 Amendment of Parts 1, 2, 15, 25, 73, and 90 of the Commission’s Rules to Make Non-Substantive Editorial
Revisions to the Table of Frequency Allocations and to Various Other Rules, Order, DA 10-762, 25 FCC Rcd 9712
(2010) (WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order).
3 The Allocation Table consists of the International Table of Frequency Allocations (International Table), the United
States Table of Frequency Allocations (U.S. Table), and the FCC Rule Part(s) cross references, as described in
further detail herein. 47 C.F.R. § 2.106.
4 See footnote 27, infra. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC), an independent agency, administers
non-Federal RF spectrum, and the NTIA, part of the Department of Commerce, administers Federal RF spectrum.
47 C.F.R. § 2.105(a).
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FCC 12-140

allocation changes that are not related to the WRC-07 Final Acts and to update certain service rules, and
request comment on other allocation issues that concern portions of the RF spectrum between 137.5 kHz
and 54.25 GHz. Additionally, by Order, we make minor updates and corrections to the Allocation Table
and to Parts 15 and 90 of the Commission’s rules. Collectively, our actions are designed to conform our
rules to the WRC-07 Final Acts and to provide significant benefits to the American public.

II.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

2. In the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking herein, we propose to:
·
Raise the secondary amateur service allocation in the 1900-2000 kHz band (100 kilohertz) to primary
status, providing amateur radio operators nearly exclusive use of the band. (para. 20)
·
Allocate the 108-117.975 MHz band to the aeronautical mobile route (R) service (AM(R)S) on a
primary basis for Federal/non-Federal shared use subject to the condition that it will not constrain
adjacent-band FM broadcasting. (para. 28)
·
Allocate 50 kilohertz of spectrum (156.4875-156.5125 MHz and 156.5375-156.5625 MHz) to the
fixed and land mobile services on a primary basis for non-Federal use. (para. 34)
·
Allocate 50 kilohertz of spectrum (161.9625-161.9875 MHz and 162.0125-162.0375 MHz) to the
mobile-satellite service (MSS) on a secondary basis for Federal/non-Federal shared use for the
reception of automatic identification system (AIS) emissions from stations operating in the maritime
mobile service. (para. 41)
·
Modify the quiet zone rules for radiolocation systems operating in the 420-450 MHz band. (para. 43)
·
Allocate the 960-1164 MHz band to the AM(R)S on a primary basis for Federal/non-Federal shared
use. (para. 49)
·
Remove the conditional secondary non-Federal fixed-satellite service (FSS) allocations from the
“Little LEO” feeder link bands as well as an unused primary non-Federal aeronautical mobile
telemetry (AMT) allocation from the 2310-2320 MHz band. (paras. 51 and 57, respectively)
·
Allocate the 5091-5150 MHz band to the aeronautical mobile service on a primary basis for
Federal/non-Federal shared use, with restrictions. (para. 64)
·
Modify the priority of microwave landing system (MLS) use of the 5091-5150 MHz band and extend
to 2016 the period in which assignments may be made to earth stations that provide feeder links for
non-geostationary satellite orbit (NGSO) systems in the MSS. (para. 67)
·
Amend Part 87 of the Commission’s rules to conform to the proposed AMT allocation. (para. 68)
·
Recognize changes to the Federal radiolocation service allocation in the 9000-9200 MHz and
9300-9500 MHz bands, provide for secondary non-Federal use of the 9300-9500 MHz band, and
allocate the 9800-9900 MHz band to the Earth exploration-satellite service for active operations
(EESS (active)) and the space research service (SRS) (active) on a secondary basis. (paras. 85-86)
·
Establish coordination areas in California and Guam for terrestrial operations in the 17.7-19.7 GHz
band. (paras. 91-92)
·
Allocate the 18-18.1 GHz band to the meteorological-satellite service for space-to-Earth (downlink)
transmission on a primary basis. (para. 100)
·
Update the list of radio astronomy stations that observe in the 81-86 GHz, 92-94 GHz, and
94.1-95 GHz bands. (para. 106)
·
Implement WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission limits for non-Federal stations in specified radio
services that transmit in four bands that are near or adjacent to passive sensor bands, and solicit
comment on alternate mitigation techniques that would be suitable for the 31-31.3 GHz band.
3

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FCC 12-140

(paras. 110, 125-126)
·
Implement WRC-07’s mandatory spectrum sharing criteria for stations that transmit in two frequency
bands that are shared with passive sensors. (paras. 147 and 155)
·
Urge operators of adjacent-band active services to take actions to comply with WRC-07’s
non-mandatory unwanted emission levels, as applicable. (paras. 110, 147-148)
3. In addition, we solicit comment on whether we should:
·
Allocate the 135.7-137.8 kHz band to the amateur radio service on a secondary basis, subject to the
protection of power line carrier (PLC) operations. (para. 16)
·
Remove a lightly-used primary non-Federal AMT allocation in the 2345-2360 MHz band and an
unused primary radionavigation service allocation from the 24.75-25.05 GHz band. (paras. 58 and
100, respectively)
4. In the Order herein, we correct grammatical, typographical, and display errors in the United
States Table of Frequency Allocations (U.S. Table) and also remove inconsistencies between the
non-Federal Table of Frequency Allocations (non-Federal Table) and the service rules. The most
significant of these updates are: 1) correct the cross references to Allocation Table footnotes in Parts 15
and 90 of the Commission’s rules; 2) update the list of grandfathered sites in the 1432-1435 MHz band;
and 3) remove an unused Federal site from the list of grandfathered sites in the 3650-3700 MHz band.

III.

BACKGROUND

A.

Allocation Table

5. Section 2.106 of the Commission’s rules contains the Table of Frequency Allocations
(Allocation Table), which sets forth the allocation of radio frequencies both domestically and
internationally.5 Except as otherwise provided for in Section 2.102 of the rules, the assignment, licensing
and use of frequencies between 9 kHz and 275 GHz must be in accordance with the Allocation Table in
Section 2.106.6 The Allocation Table is a formatted graphical table of six columns that are divided into
cells, with each cell representing a specific frequency band (band). The Allocation Table consists of three
sections: 1) the International Table of Frequency Allocations (International Table),7 which is subdivided
into the Region 1 Table (column 1), the Region 2 Table (column 2), and the Region 3 Table (column 3);8
2) the United States Table (U.S. Table),9 which is subdivided into the Federal Table of Frequency
Allocations (Federal Table) (column 4) and the non-Federal Table of Frequency Allocations (non-Federal
Table) (column 5);10 and 3) the FCC Rule Part(s) (column 6).11


5 The allocation (of a frequency band) is an entry in the Table of Frequency Allocations of a given frequency band
for the purpose of its use by one or more terrestrial or space radiocommunication services or the radio astronomy
service under specified conditions. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
6 47 C.F.R. § 2.102(a).
7 The International Table is described in 47 C.F.R. § 2.104.
8 47 C.F.R. § 2.104(a), (h). For the allocation of radio frequencies, the ITU has divided the world into three Regions
and has codified the allocations for these Regions in its Table of Frequency Allocations. The United States and
most of its insular areas are in Region 2, which is essentially North America and South America. Region 1 is
generally Europe, Africa, the Middle East, the former Soviet Union, and Mongolia. Region 3 is the rest of Asia and
Australasia. See 47 C.F.R. § 2.104(b) for the ITU’s official definitions and map of the Regions.
9 The U.S. Table is described in 47 C.F.R. § 2.105.
10 In the United States, radio spectrum may be allocated for either Federal or non-Federal use exclusively, or for
Federal/non-Federal shared use. 47 C.F.R. § 2.105(b).
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FCC 12-140

6. The International Table generally reflects the Regional allocations and international footnotes
shown in Table of Frequency Allocations within the International Telecommunication Union (ITU)
Radio Regulations (ITU Allocation Table).12 The U.S. Table is the Commission’s means of organizing
and presenting how the radio spectrum is used in the United States and its Region 2 insular areas and it
illustrates both NTIA- and FCC-administered RF spectrum, including those frequency bands with both
Federal and non-Federal allocations. The Federal Table portion of the U.S. Table illustrates frequency
bands that are administered by the NTIA, and the non-Federal Table portion illustrates frequency bands
that are administered by the Commission.13 References to international, U.S., Federal, and non-Federal
footnotes are shown within the U.S. Table.14 The text of the international, U.S., Federal, and non-Federal
footnotes immediately follow the Allocation Table.15 The FCC Rule Part(s) portion of the table contains
cross references to relevant FCC Rule Part(s), where applicable.16 The International Table, the Federal
Table, and the FCC Rule Part(s) are included in the Commission’s Allocation Table for informational
purposes only.17
7. When we refer to U.S., Federal, and non-Federal footnotes in this Notice, we will use the
same nomenclature specified in Section 2.105 of the Commission’s rules and employed in the
U.S. Table.18 For the international footnotes we reference in this Notice, however, we will substitute a
different nomenclature to help identify those footnotes. For example, the ITU Radio Regulations refer to
international footnote 5.53 as Radio Regulation (RR) No. 5.53, which is simply abbreviated as
“No. 5.53.” Instead of using this abbreviation, to more clearly indicate that we are referring to an
international footnote, we will use the abbreviation “RR 5.53.” In addition, in the WRC-07 Table
(Continued from previous page)


11 The FCC Rule Part(s) cross references are described in 47 C.F.R. § 2.105(e).
12 47 C.F.R. § 2.104(h). See ITU Radio Regulations, Edition of 2008 at Article 5 (titled “Frequency allocations”),
Section IV (titled “Table of Frequency Allocations”) (ITU Allocation Table).
13 47 C.F.R. § 2.105(a). NTIA regulates and approves the use of spectrum by Federal departments and agencies and
maintains the Federal Table in its Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency
Management
(NTIA Manual). See Section 305(a) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 305.
See Public Law 102-538, 106 Stat. 3533 (1992); 47 C.F.R. § 2.105(a). The Commission regulates and approves the
use of spectrum by non-Federal entities and maintains the non-Federal Table in Section 2.106. See Section 303 of
the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. 303; 47 C.F.R. §§ 2.102(a) and (b)(2); 2.105(a).
14 Where an international footnote is applicable, without modification, to both Federal and non-Federal operations,
the Commission places the footnote in both the Federal Table and the non-Federal Table and the international
footnote is binding on both Federal users and non-Federal licensees. If, however, an international footnote pertains
to a service allocated only for Federal or non-Federal use, we place the international footnote only in the affected
Table. Any footnote consisting of “5.” followed by one or more digits, e.g., 5.53, denotes an international footnote.
U.S. footnotes appear in both the Federal and non-Federal Tables. Any footnote consisting of the letters “US”
followed by one or more digits, e.g., US7, denotes a stipulation affecting both Federal and non-Federal operations.
Federal footnotes appear solely in the Federal Table. Any footnote consisting of the letter “G” followed by one or
more digits, e.g., G2, denotes a stipulation applicable only to Federal operations. Non-Federal footnotes appear
solely in the non-Federal Table. Any footnote consisting of the letters “NG” followed by one or more digits, e.g.,
NG2, denotes a stipulation applicable only to non-Federal operations. In some cases, a letter, or letters, may be
appended to the digit(s) of a footnote number to preserve the sequential order. 47 C.F.R § 2.105(d)(5).
15 47 C.F.R. § 2.106 INTERNATIONAL FOOTNOTES, UNITED STATES (US) FOOTNOTES, FEDERAL GOVERNMENT (G)
FOOTNOTES, and NON-FEDERAL GOVERNMENT (NG) FOOTNOTES. Because all footnotes to the Allocation Table are
listed in Section 2.106, it is unnecessary to individually cite the footnotes that are discussed in this Notice and Order,
and therefore we dispense with the formal citation for each individual footnote.
16 47 C.F.R. § 2.105(e).
17 47 C.F.R. §§ 2.104(a), 2.105(d)(3) and (e).
18 47 C.F.R. § 2.105(d)(5)(ii), (iii), and (iv). See also footnote 14, supra.
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Clean-up Order, the Commission adopted a new system for numbering domestic footnotes.19 Under this
convention, we organize and number domestic footnotes based on frequency order, except that we
generally number those domestic footnotes that are based on international footnotes on the related
international footnote’s number. In this proceeding, we continue to implement our new system for
numbering domestic footnotes based on frequency order.
8. Finally, we note that while both the FCC and NTIA share jurisdiction over RF spectrum, the
FCC does not authorize or license Federal users. Many of our proposals pertain to Federal/non-Federal
shared bands and would, for example, modify and update U.S. footnotes that are applicable to both
Federal and non-Federal users. These have been coordinated with NTIA. Nevertheless, we emphasize
that it will be necessary for NTIA to make conforming modifications to its NTIA Manual for these
changes to apply to Federal users. In parts of this document where we discuss how our proposals would
affect both Federal and non-Federal uses of a frequency band, we do not intend to suggest that we could
or would make unilateral changes to Federal spectrum use.

B.

Procedural Background

9. The ITU, under the auspices of the United Nations, periodically convenes a World
Radiocommunication Conference to address international spectrum use. The Commission conducted its
primary preparations for WRC-07 via its 2007 World Radiocommunication Conference Advisory
Committee (WAC), which held 11 public meetings between January 30, 2004, and December 13, 2006, to
evaluate and approve recommendations and preliminary views that were later submitted for Commission
consideration.20 The U.S. Proposals for WRC-07 that resulted from that process addressed many of the
items on the WRC-07 agenda.21 In addition, the United States worked with other administrations to craft
inter-American (i.e., ITU Region 2) proposals.22 From February 19-March 2, 2007, the ITU


19 WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order, 25 FCC Rcd at 9718-19 paras. 14-15 (describing this numbering convention in
greater detail).
20 The Commission, under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), chartered the WAC to provide the
Commission with advice and technical support and to recommend proposals for WRC-07. Each of the advisory
committee’s five Informal Working Groups (IWGs) discussed and drafted preliminary views and proposals and
presented these drafts to the full Advisory Committee. Drafts approved by the Advisory Committee became the
Committee’s recommendations to the Commission. In addition, NTIA submitted letters to the Commission
containing draft proposals that had been developed by Federal agencies. By public notice, the Commission
requested comment on the WAC’s recommendations and the Federal proposals. After consideration by the
U.S. Government, many of the recommendations and proposals became a part of the United States’ views and draft
proposals that formed the basis for discussions at bilateral, regional, and international meetings in preparation for
WRC-07. See http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-3907A1.pdf and
http://www.fcc.gov/ib/wrc-07/.
21 The U.S. Proposals to the ITU for WRC-07 consisted of Conference Document 5 and Addendum 1 through
Addendum 17. The allocation proposals that we make herein are based on the WRC-07 Final Acts and the
U.S. proposals contained in Conference Document 5, Addendum 1 and Addendum 4. See United States of America
Proposals for the Work of the Conference
, plenary meeting, Document 5-E, February 9, 2007 (U.S. Proposals for
WRC-07
); United States of America Proposals for the Work of the Conference [for] Agenda item 1.2, Addendum 1
to Document 5-E, September 7, 2007 (Addendum 1 to U.S. Proposals); and United States of America Proposals for
the Work of the Conference [for] Agenda item 1.20
, Addendum 4 to Document 5-E, September 7, 2007
(Addendum 4 to U.S. Proposals).
22 See CITEL Administrations Proposals for the Work of the Conference, plenary meeting, Document 14-E, dated
October 2, 2007, at http://www.fcc.gov/ib/wrc-07/rcp/citel/con14.doc.
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Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) prepared and approved a report on technical, operational, and
regulatory/procedural matters relevant to the WRC-07 Agenda.23
10. The ITU convened WRC-07 from October 22-November 16, 2007, in Geneva, Switzerland,
with 161 Member States participating.24 WRC-07 addressed 30 agenda items affecting nearly all
terrestrial and space radio services and applications and adopted allocation changes that relate to RF
bands used by both Federal and non-Federal entities in the United States. The ITU published the actions
taken at WRC-07 as the WRC-07 Final Acts and subsequently revised the ITU Radio Regulations to
include these actions.25 Free online access to all current ITU-R Recommendations and Reports is now
provided to the general public.26
11. On August 20, 2009, NTIA forwarded to the Commission its recommendations for
implementation of the WRC-07 Final Acts in the U.S. Table.27 On July 21, 2010, the Commission
released the WRC-07 Clean-up Order, which amended Parts 1, 2, 15, 25, 73, and 90 of its rules to make
non-substantive, editorial revisions to the Allocation Table, related sections in Part 2, and certain service
rules in the above-noted rule parts. In particular, the Commission updated the International Table to
reflect the allocation changes that WRC-07 made in the WRC-07 Final Acts.28 On July 26, 2012, NTIA
revised certain of its recommendations for implementation of the WRC-07 Final Acts in the U.S. Table.29


23 See ITU Radiocommunication Sector “CPM [Conference Preparatory Meeting] Report on technical, operational
and regulatory/procedural matters to be considered by the 2007 World Radiocommunication Conference (Geneva,
2007),” posted on the ITU website on July 12, 2007 (CPM-07 Report).
24 For an overview of U.S. participation in WRC-07, see United States Delegation Report [on] World
Radiocommunication Conference 2007, submitted to the Secretary of State by Ambassador Richard M. Russell,
United States Head of Delegation (U.S. Delegation Report). See also ITU Results of WRC-07 “Bringing all radio
services together
,” presented at the ITU Regional Radiocommunication Seminar, April 14-18, 2008, Buenos Aires,
Argentina.
25 See ITU Radio Regulations, Edition of 2008, available at http://www.itu.int/pub/R-REG-RR/en (ITU Radio
Regulations
).
26 The ITU-R Recommendations are available at http://www.itu.int/pub/R-REC, and the ITU-R Reports are
available at http://www.itu.int/pub/R-REP.
27 See Letter from Karl B. Nebbia, Associate Administrator, Office of Spectrum Management, NTIA, to
Julius P. Knapp, Chief, Office of Engineering and Technology (OET), ET Docket No. 12-338, dated August 20,
2009 (NTIA WRC-07 Implementation Recommendations). On September 28, 2009, NTIA corrected and
supplemented its recommendations for WRC-07 domestic implementation. See Letter from Karl B. Nebbia to
Julius P. Knapp, ET Docket No. 12-338, dated September 28, 2009 (NTIA WRC-07 Supplement).
28 Because the WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order only implemented changes of a non-substantive nature, the Order
created four placeholder U.S. footnotes – US226, US444, US444A, and US519 – to replicate the pre-WRC-07 text
of four international footnotes (RR 5.226, RR 5.444, RR 5.444A, and RR 5.519, respectively) that WRC-07
modified and require a Commission rulemaking before they can be implemented in the United States. See
WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order
, 25 FCC Rcd at 9723-24 paras. 21-25.
29 In particular, we note that this letter addresses WRC-07’s allocation of the 4400-4940 MHz and 5925-6700 MHz
bands for wideband aeronautical mobile telemetry (AMT) systems that would be used for flight testing purposes and
that are not considered an application of a safety service. The 4400-4940 MHz band is essentially a Federal
exclusive band and the 5925-6700 MHz band is essentially a non-Federal exclusive band. NTIA initially
recommended that we allocate both of these frequency bands for both Federal and non-Federal AMT use on a
primary basis, based on the assumption that some flight test requirements could be accommodated in these large
frequency ranges. More recently, NTIA elaborated that it could not support a non-Federal AMT allocation in the
4400-4940 MHz band if the Commission declined to propose to allocate the 5925-6700 MHz band for primary
Federal AMT use. Because of the large number of existing incumbent operations in the 5925-6700 MHz band and
because of the potential for a single co-frequency airborne station to cause harmful interference over large
geographic areas to these primary stations, we do not believe it prudent to propose adding any AMT allocation in
(continued…)
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The actions we propose in this notice are designed to complete the implementation of certain of the
WRC-07 Final Acts in the U.S. Table and other allocation matters. Finally, in the Order portion of this
action, we make several additional non-substantive, editorial revisions to the Allocation Table. For
organizational purposes, we have generally arranged our discussion of individual allocation issues by
ascending frequency range.30 In addition, we provide a glossary of frequently used radiocommunication
service terms in Appendix A.
12.
The ITU convened the World Radiocommunication Conference 2012 (WRC-12) from
January 23-February 17, 2012, in Geneva, Switzerland, with 165 Member States participating.31 In
general, this proceeding does not address the WRC-12 Final Acts.32 We recognize that, in conjunction
with the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking portion of this item, commenters may wish to identify specific
actions taken at WRC-12 and discuss how they might affect our proposals herein. While we welcome
such comments, we generally anticipate addressing the actions taken at WRC-12 in a separate
implementation proceeding.

IV.

NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULEMAKING

A.

LF (30 to 300 kHz) and MF (300 to 3000 kHz) Allocations

1.

New Amateur Service Band (135.7-137.8 kHz)

13.
In the U.S. Table, the 130-160 kHz band is allocated to the fixed service (FS) and maritime
mobile service (MMS) on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use.33 WRC-07 allocated the
135.7-137.8 kHz band to the amateur radio service on a secondary basis in all ITU Regions. WRC-07
also adopted RR 5.67A, which restricts the use of this LF allocation to amateur radio stations transmitting
with a maximum equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) of 1 watt (W).34 There are no
non-Federal stations in the FS and MMS that are licensed to operate in the 135.7-137.8 kHz band, and
Federal use of this band is light.35
(Continued from previous page)


this band. As a result, Federal AMT operations are likely to occupy much of the 4400-4940 MHz band, leaving
little or no capacity for non-Federal AMT operations in that band. Additionally, we note that NTIA’s ongoing study
of whether the 1755-1850 MHz band should be repurposed for commercial broadband use raises the potential that
much of the spectrum space in the 4400-4940 MHz band would be further encumbered by relocated Federal AMT
operations. Consequently, we are not proposing either allocation. See also WRC-07 Final Acts, RR 5.440A (for
AMT use of the 4400-4940 MHz band) and RR 5.457A (for AMT use of the 5925-6700 MHz band).
30 47 C.F.R. § 2.101.
31 See ITU Press Release, Feb. 17, 2012 at http://www.itu.int/net/pressoffice/press_releases/2012/10.aspx.
32 See Final Acts of [the 2012] World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12), Geneva, 23 January–
17 February 2012, available at http://www.itu.int/pub/R-ACT-WRC.9-2012 (WRC-12 Final Acts).
33 The FS is a radiocommunication service between specified fixed points, and the MMS is a mobile service between
coast stations and ship stations, or between ship stations, or between associated on-board communication stations;
survival craft stations and emergency position-indicating radiobeacon stations may also participate in this service.
47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c). RR 5.64 restricts stations in the FS and MMS to certain classes of emissions.
34 RR 5.67A also requires that amateur stations not cause harmful interference to stations of the radionavigation
service operating in Mongolia, Kyrgyzstan, and Turkmenistan. ITU-R studies have shown that the radiation
efficiency of typical amateur radio stations’ transmitting antennas is typically less than 1 percent, resulting, in
practice, in an EIRP of about 1 W. Reception of these transmissions over long paths has been demonstrated using
receiving systems employing long integration times. See CPM-07 Report, Chapter 5, Agenda item 1.15, at 111.
35 On February 21, 2012, the staff conducted a study of the 135.7-137.8 kHz band using the Commission’s Universal
Licensing System (ULS) and found no active call signs. There are 3 Federal assignments that authorize operations
in the 135.7-137.8 kHz band: a coast station located in Dixon, California, transmits on 21 frequencies below
150 kHz, including two frequencies (135.95 and 139.1 kHz) that overlap segments of the WRC-07 allocation, to
(continued…)
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14.
We note, however, that electric utilities operate Power Line Carrier (PLC) systems in the
9-490 kHz band for communications important to the reliability and security of electric service to the
public.36 PLC systems operate under the provisions of Section 15.113 of the Commission’s rules on an
unprotected and non-interference basis with respect to authorized radio users, and the provisions of this
section are restricted to PLC operations on transmission lines.37 A power utility operating a PLC system
must submit the details of all existing systems plus any proposed new systems or changes to existing
systems to the Utilities Telecom Council (UTC).38
15.
Previously, in ET Docket No. 02-98, the Commission, inter alia, considered allocating the
135.7-137.8 kHz band to the amateur service on a secondary basis and in that matter examined the
potential for amateur transmissions to cause harmful interference39 to PLC systems.40 It declined to make
that allocation after finding the potential for interference between the amateur operations proposed at that
time and the incumbent PLCs, and noting the importance of PLC operations in helping maintain critical
electric infrastructure.41 The Commission did, however, recognize the potential for some limited amateur
operations in this band under individual experimental licenses, and observed that such operations would
“allow empirical data to be developed on the sharing possibilities in this band for future consideration.”42
16.
Because the 135.7-137.8 kHz band is now allocated internationally to the amateur service
on a secondary basis in all ITU Regions, we conclude that it is an appropriate time to re-examine the
potential for shared amateur service-PLC use of the band. We seek comment on whether the
135.7-137.8 kHz band should be allocated to the amateur service on a secondary basis and restricted in
accordance with RR 5.67A. Commenters should address, in particular, any recent developments that
would prompt a re-evaluation of the Commission’s prior decision.
17.
Because PLC systems operating under Section 15.113 of the rules serve important
functions, such as tripping protection circuits if a downed power line or other fault is detected in the
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ships in the Pacific Ocean using a bandwidth of 3 kilohertz or less, and the 126.7-141.7 kHz band is used to track
tagged salmon in Pacific watersheds.
36 47 C.F.R. § 2.106, footnote US2.
37 The provisions of Section 15.113 “apply only to systems operated by a power utility for general supervision of the
power system and do not permit operation on electric lines which connect the distribution substation to the customer
or house wiring.” 47 C.F.R. § 15.113. See also “How the System Works” (describing the electrical distribution
system) on the Edison Electric Institute’s website (available at
http://www.eei.org/ourissues/electricitydistribution/Pages/HowWorks.aspx).
38 UTC is the “industry-operated entity” specified in 47 C.F.R. § 15.113(a).
39 Harmful interference is interference which endangers the functioning of a radionavigation service or of other
safety services or seriously degrades, obstructs, or repeatedly interrupts a radiocommunication service operating in
accordance with the ITU Radio Regulations. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
40 The Commission also stated that it believed that sharing of this spectrum would be facilitated if the amateur
station is limited to an EIRP of 1 W and the transmission bandwidth is limited to 100 Hz. Because of possible
difficulty in measuring the EIRP of an amateur station in this frequency range, the Commission also proposed to
limit amateur transmitter output power in this band to 100 W peak envelope power (PEP). Amendment of Parts 2
and 97 of the Commission’s Rules to Create a Low Frequency Allocation for the Amateur Radio Service, ET Docket
No. 02-98, Notice of Proposed Rule Making, FCC 02-136, 17 FCC Rcd 8954, 8963 ¶ 25 (2002) (2003 Amateur
Radio NPRM
) (FCC 02-136).
41 Amendment of Parts 2 and 97 of the Commission’s Rules to Create a Low Frequency Allocation for the Amateur
Radio Service, ET Docket No. 02-98, Report and Order, 18 FCC Rcd 10258, 10264 ¶ 18 (2003) (FCC 04-71). See
also
ARRL Petition for Rule Making, RM-9404, received Oct. 22, 1998, at 15, Table 3 (ARRL LF Petition).
42 18 FCC Rcd 10264 ¶ 20.
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power grid, we would only consider adding an amateur allocation if we were comfortable that amateur
radio and utility PLC systems could successfully co-exist in the band. We seek comment on technical
rules or methods that could be implemented to assure such coexistence. How do other nations
accommodate amateur radio use in this band, and are there differences in PLC systems deployment that
might make those models more or less useful in the United States? Are there other segments within the
9-490 kHz band where use by amateur stations would be a better fit from a spectrum sharing viewpoint?43
18.
We seek comment on the advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and benefits
associated with changing our rules. For example, what benefits might accrue to the amateur radio
community? To what extent do utilities deploy PLC systems on distribution lines in the 9-490 kHz band
under our Part 15 rules, and how would those operations be affected were we to add a new secondary
amateur radio service allocation in this band? What specific actions would PLC systems operators need
to take if there were a secondary amateur radio service allocation in the band, and what are the associated
costs?
19.
We seek comment on whether the concept of requiring individual amateur stations to be
“quasi-coordinated” for fixed use at a specified location – an option that we did not pursue in 2003 – still
holds merit.44 Are there other steps, such as limiting operating privileges in this frequency band (e.g., to
Amateur Extra Class licensees), that would better facilitate amateur use of the band? We also seek
comment on the relevance of studies that discuss the potential for in-band amateur service radio
transmitters to operate compatibly with PLC systems in light of any developments since our 2003
decision.45 In particular we seek comment on the appropriate maximum field strength level and minimum
separation distance from PLC systems for secondary amateur service operations in this band.


43 We note that UTC previously offered to “identify alternative bands or to develop technical standards that would
protect incumbent operations.” See UTC ex parte filing at 6, RM-9404, received May 20, 1999. We also note that
WRC-12 allocated the 472-479 kHz band to the amateur service on a secondary basis in all ITU Regions, subject to
certain geographic and operational restrictions. See WRC-12 Final Acts, Article 5 (titled “Frequency allocations”),
at 6-7 (table entry for the 472-479 kHz band, RR 5.80A, and RR 5.80B).
44 We note that, had the Commission allocated the 135.7-137.8 kHz band to the amateur service on a secondary
basis in 2003, UTC offered to conduct a “quasi-coordination” process to reduce the risk of interference to PLC
systems. Under the UTC suggestion, the Commission would have required that amateur operators submit data to
UTC about their proposed operations. UTC would then notify utilities about those amateur operations that may
impact their PLC systems. Utilities and amateur operators would cooperate to avoid causing interference to each
others’ operations. See UTC Comments, ET Docket No. 02-98, received July 29, 2002. Irrespective of whether
UTC is still willing to assist the Commission with its suggested “quasi-coordination” process, we believe that, as an
initial matter, it would be helpful to generally limit the vertical antenna height of amateur stations transmitting in the
135.7-137.8 kHz band to 60.96 meters (200 feet) and to also consider the low efficiency of antennas in this band.
See ARRL LF Petition, RM-9404, at 13; ARRL LF Erratum, RM-9404, received Nov. 18, 1998 (correcting p. 13 of
the Petition); and http://www.fcc.gov/help/antenna-structure-registration-asr-help (An antenna structure must be
registered if the antenna structure is taller than 200 feet above ground level or may interfere with the flight path of a
nearby airport).
45 For example, NTIA Technical Report TR-85-181, titled “Evaluation Techniques – Fixed Service Systems to
Power-Line-Carrier Circuits,” U.S. Department of Commerce, Sept. 1985, at pp. 2-1, 5-77 suggests that in-band
amateur service radio transmitters can operate compatibly with PLC systems if the electric field strength from
the amateur service radio transmitters in the vicinity of the transmission lines does not exceed 81.2 dBμV/m.
Specifically, using Figure 47, 81.2 dBμV/m is the threshold field intensity level for the frequency 136 kHz at which
interference occurs to PLC systems on transmission lines with 161 kV and lower voltages.
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2.

Amateur 160 Meter Band (1800-2000 kHz)

20.
Next, we propose changes for an existing amateur service allocation in what is known as
the 160 meter band at 1800-2000 kHz.46 Specifically, we propose to reallocate the 1900-2000 kHz
sub-band (segment) of the 160 meter band to the amateur service on a primary basis.
21.
The amateur 160 meter band consists of two segments: the 1800-1900 kHz segment, which
is allocated to the amateur service on an exclusive basis, and the 1900-2000 kHz segment, which is
allocated to the radiolocation service (RLS) on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use and to the
amateur service on a secondary basis under the terms of US290.47 We note that ARRL, the national
association for Amateur Radio (ARRL), has identified the 160 meter band and the amateur HF bands as
“[b]y far, the heaviest-used [amateur service] allocations.”48
22.
Historically, the 1715-2000 kHz band was allocated exclusively to the amateur service.49
In 1953, the Commission removed the 1715-1800 kHz segment from the amateur radio service and
allocated the 1800-2000 kHz band to the amateur service on a shared basis with the radionavigation
service (RNS).50 In 1983, the Commission allocated the 1800-1900 kHz band to the amateur service on
an exclusive basis and the 1900-2000 kHz band to the RLS on a primary basis for Federal and
non-Federal use and, pursuant to US290, to the amateur service on a secondary basis.51 The Commission
stated that: “The purpose of allocating this band [1900-2000 kHz] to the radiolocation service was to
provide reaccommodation spectrum for radiolocation users that will have to move out of the
1605-1705 kHz band when AM broadcasting is implemented in that band.”52 The AM broadcasting


46 In the Amateur Radio Service, the usual means of identifying radio spectrum is by wavelength rather than by
frequency. 47 C.F.R. § 97.301(b)-(d).
47 Radiodetermination is defined as the determination of the position, velocity, and/or other characteristics of an
object, or the obtaining of information relating to these parameters, by means of the propagation properties of radio
waves. There are two main fields within radiodetermination: 1) radionavigation, which is radiodetermination used
for the purposes of navigation, including obstruction warning; and 2) radiolocation, which is radiodetermination
used for purposes other than those of radionavigation. The RLS is defined as a radiodetermination service for the
purpose of radiolocation. The most common use of the RLS allocation is radar (which is a radiodetermination
system based on the comparison of reference signals with radio signals reflected, or retransmitted, from the position
to be determined). 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
48 See ARRL Comments, ET Docket No. 03-104, received July 7, 2003, p. 2.
49 See, e.g., 47 C.F.R. 1938 Supp. 1940, Section 2.73 (Allocation of carrier frequencies to various services) at
pp. 59-60 where 72 frequencies from 1716 kHz to 2000 kHz are allocated to the amateur service, but listed as
“1,715 to 2,000 kilocycles” in Section 12.201 (p. 249). This allocation was later shifted to “1,750 to 2,050
kilocycles.” See, e.g., 47 C.F.R. 1938 Cum. Supp. 1944, Section 12.111 (p. 11714).
50 The RNS is a radiodetermination service for the purpose of radionavigation. See footnote 47, supra, for the
definition of radionavigation. LORAN (LOng RAnge Navigation) was an RNS system using LF (90-110 kHz) and
MF (1715-2000 kHz) transmitters in multiple deployments (multilateration) to determine the location and speed of
the receiver. See, e.g., 47 C.F.R. § 12.111(a)(1) (1953-1952 edition).
51 Amendment of Part 2 of the Commission’s Rules Regarding Implementation of the Final Acts of the World
Administrative Radio Conference, Geneva, 1979, General Docket 80-739, Second Report and Order, 49 FR 2358,
2360 paras. 21 and 24 (Jan. 19, 1984) (WARC-79 Second R&O).
52 Id. at 2360.
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proceeding was resolved in 2000,53 and our review of the Commission’s Universal Licensing System
(ULS) database finds that no one is licensed to use this non-Federal RLS allocation.54
23.
Current Federal use of the 1900-2000 kHz band is light, with 10 assignments that authorize
operations in this band. A single Federal assignment authorizes land and mobile stations in the RLS to
transmit on 1922 kHz using a necessary bandwidth of 600 hertz (Hz) within a protected radius of
193 kilometers (km) centered on San Diego, California. All other Federal assignments in the
1900-2000 kHz band are for unallocated uses, and thus, these assignments operate on an unprotected and
non-interference basis.55
24.
We propose to amend the U.S. Table to remove the Federal and non-Federal RLS
allocations from the 1900-2000 kHz band and to raise the secondary amateur service allocation to primary
status because there appear to be few (if any) RLS stations operating in this band. In addition, we note
that “this [RLS] allocation was made for reaccommodation purposes and not to provide additional
spectrum for radiolocations needs,”56 that the Commission has concluded its AM Expanded Band
proceeding that would have prompted non-Federal RLS licensees to relocate to the 1900-2000 kHz band,
and that this band was historically allocated to the amateur service on an exclusive basis. We request
comment on the status of Federal RLS stations that are authorized to operate in the San Diego area, and
the extent NTIA would need us to recognize them as grandfathered Federal users. We also anticipate that
the other relatively low-power Federal assignments would continue to operate on an unprotected and
non-interference basis. Consequently, we propose to delete US290 from the list of U.S. footnotes and to
delete the 1900-2000 kHz band and several limitations that pertain only to that band from the
Radiolocation Service Frequency Table in Section 90.103(b) of the Commission’s rules.57 We also
propose to amend Section 97.303 by revising paragraph (c) to remove the 1900-2000 kHz segment from
the list of frequency segments that are allocated to the RLS in the United States and other nations; and by
revising paragraph (g) to list, by ITU Region, where amateur stations transmitting in the 160 meter band
must not cause harmful interference to, and must accept interference from, stations authorized by other
nations.58 The proposed changes are shown in Appendix D. This action would update the Commission’s


53 Implementation of the AM Expanded Band Allotment Plan, MM Docket No.87-267, Memorandum Opinion and
Order
, 15 FCC Rcd 17018 (2000). This Order is the last activity in the docket, resolving an issue remanded from
the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in an unreported order on March 6, 1998.
54 Specifically, on July 20, 2012, Commission staff conducted a review of the 1900-2000 kHz band using the
Commission’s ULS database and found no active call signs.
55 Federal coast stations located at Fort Story, Virginia, and Point Loma, California, intermittently transmit
narrowband signals (100 hertz) on four frequencies (1910, 1926, 1938, and 1968 kHz) to ships approximately 20 km
offshore. Federal stations in the FS and mobile service transmit on 1998.5 kHz with necessary bandwidths between
100 hertz and 3 kilohertz.
56 WARC-79 Second R&O, 49 FR 2360 para. 24.
57 RLS rules are contained in the Part 90 Private Land Mobile Radio rules, Subpart F. The 1900-2000 kHz band is
shown in the Radiolocation Service Frequency Table as the “1900 to 1950” and “1950 to 2000” kHz bands.
Because Limitations 25-28 pertain only to the 1900-2000 kHz band, we would also remove and reserve Section
90.103(c)(25)-(28). 47 C.F.R. § 90.103(b).
58 The 1800-2000 kHz band is allocated to the amateur service on a primary basis in ITU Regions 2 and 3, and the
1810-1850 kHz band is allocated to the amateur service on a primary basis in ITU Region 1. While the
1800-1850 kHz segment in ITU Region 2 and the 1830-1850 kHz segment in ITU Region 1 are allocated
exclusively to the amateur service, the entire 160 meter band in ITU Region 3 and all other segments in ITU
Regions 1 and 2 are shared with other radiocommunication services. Because of the large distances that signals in
the 160 meter band can propagate, and because of the requirement that stations “operate so as to not cause harmful
interference to any service of the same or higher category in the other ITU Regions or sub-Regions,” we have
reflected the allocations in each of the Regions and sub-Regions in the proposed revision of Section 97.303(g).
47 C.F.R. § 97.303(a), (c), (g). See also Note to § 97.303 (The Allocation Table contains the complete, unabridged,
(continued…)
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rules to reflect actual usage and would – after more than half a century – restore this 100 kilohertz of
spectrum to nearly exclusive amateur service use. We seek comment on these proposals.

B.

VHF (30 to 300 MHz) Allocations

1.

Additional Aeronautical Use of 108-117.975 MHz

25.
In the U.S. Table, the 108-117.975 MHz band is currently allocated to the aeronautical
radionavigation service (ARNS) on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use.59 US93 states that
the frequency 108 MHz may be authorized for use by VHF omnidirectional range (VOR) test facilities,
subject to the condition that no interference is caused to the reception of frequency modulation (FM)
broadcasting stations.60 In addition, US343 states that Differential-Global-Positioning-System (DGPS)
stations, limited to ground-based transmitters, may be authorized on a primary basis in the
108-117.975 MHz band for the specific purpose of transmitting DGPS information intended for aircraft
navigation.61
26.
The 2003 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-03) adopted RR 5.197A, which
provided a limited aeronautical mobile (route) service (AM(R)S) allocation in the 108-117.975 MHz band
to support air navigation and surveillance functions.62 In its preparation for WRC-07, the United States
stated that the only AM(R)S allocations in the 108-117.975 MHz band that it was considering were for
new aviation navigation surveillance technology – DGPS in the 108-112 MHz band – which is consistent
with RR 5.197A.63 WRC-07 modified RR 5.197A to remove the limitation to air navigation and
(Continued from previous page)


and legally binding frequency sharing requirements that pertain to the Amateur Radio Service).
59 The ARNS is a radionavigation service intended for the benefit and safe operation of aircraft. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
60 US93 also states that VOR operation on this frequency should not be essential for the safety of life or property.
A VOR station is defined as a radionavigation land station in the ARNS providing direct indication of the bearing
(omni-bearing) of that station from an aircraft. 47 C.F.R. § 87.5. The Commission has issued 75 call signs for
VOR test facilities on 108 MHz, and Federal agencies hold six such authorizations. VOR stations are assigned
frequencies in the in 108-117.975 MHz band. Frequencies in the 108-111.975 MHz band are also assigned to
localizer stations. 47 C.F.R. § 87.475.
61 In 2003, the Commission authorized the use of DGPS in the 108-117.975 MHz band on a non-developmental
basis, and also required DGPS receivers to meet the International Civil Aviation Organization’s minimum
interference immunity requirements. Review of Part 87 of the Commission's Rules Concerning the Aviation Radio
Service, WT Docket No. 01-289, Report and Order and Further Notice of Proposed Rule Making,
18 FCC Rcd 21432, 21457-59 (2003).
62 RR 5.197A (WRC-03) read as follows: “The band 108-117.975 MHz may also be used by the aeronautical mobile
(R) service on a primary basis, limited to systems that transmit navigational information in support of air navigation and
surveillance functions in accordance with recognized international aviation standards. Such use shall be in accordance
with Resolution 413 (WRC-03) and shall not cause harmful interference to nor claim protection from stations operating
in the aeronautical radionavigation service which operate in accordance with international aeronautical standards.” This
international footnote was not implemented domestically. See CPM-07 Report at 1/1.6/1.3 (where AM(R)S use is
characterized as an allocation). The AM(R)S is an aeronautical mobile service (AMS) reserved for communications
relating to safety and regularity of flight, primarily along national or international civil air routes. AMS is a mobile
service between aeronautical stations and aircraft stations, or between aircraft stations, in which survival craft
stations may participate; emergency position indicating radiobeacon stations may also participate in this service on
designated distress and emergency frequencies. An aeronautical station is defined as a land station in the AMS. In
certain instances, an aeronautical station may be located, for example, on board a ship or on a platform at sea. An
aircraft station is defined as a mobile station in the aeronautical mobile service, other than a survival craft station,
located on board an aircraft. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
63 WRC-07 revised RR 5.197A to read as follows: “Additional allocation: the band 108-117.975 MHz is also
allocated on a primary basis to the aeronautical mobile (R) service, limited to systems operating in accordance with
recognized international aeronautical standards. Such use shall be in accordance with Resolution 413
(Rev.WRC-07). The use of the band 108-112 MHz by the aeronautical mobile (R) service shall be limited to
(continued…)
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surveillance functions. In addition, WRC-07 revised RR 5.197A to state that the 108-117.975 MHz band
is allocated to the AM(R)S on a primary basis, limited to systems operating in accordance with
recognized international aeronautical standards, that such use must be in accordance with
Resolution 413,64 and that AM(R)S use of the 108-112 MHz sub-band is limited to DGPS ground-based
transmitters and associated receivers. We note that this WRC-07 action was significantly broader than the
proposals in the U.S. Proposals for WRC-07.65
27.
With respect to the 108-117.975 MHz band, NTIA recommends that we add RR 5.197A to
the U.S. Table and that we remove the 108-117.975 MHz band from the text of US343.66
28.
Because of existing claims of harmful interference to ARNS use of the 108-117.975 MHz
band from FM broadcasting stations, which operate in the adjacent 88-108 MHz band, we believe that we
should address the potential for similar interference concerns to arise with an AM(R)S allocation.67 In
particular, we note that Resolution 413 states “that no compatibility criteria currently exist between FM
broadcasting systems operating in the frequency band 87-108 MHz and the planned additional
aeronautical systems in the adjacent band 108-117.975 MHz using aircraft transmission” and “that no
compatibility criteria currently exist between digital sound broadcasting systems capable of operating in
the frequency band at about 87-108 MHz and aeronautical services in the band 108-117.975 MHz.”68 We
are also concerned that any interference resolution is further complicated by the fact that the Federal
Aviation Administration’s (FAA) proposed frequency notification requirements for FM radio stations are
still pending,69 and because it appears that the FAA also has not implemented the International Civil
Aviation Organization’s (ICAO’s)70 improved performance standards for Instrument Landing System
(Continued from previous page)


systems composed of ground-based transmitters and associated receivers that provide navigational information in
support of air navigation functions in accordance with recognized international aeronautical standards.”
64 WRC-07 revised Resolution 413 to resolve that any AM(R)S system operating in the 108-117.975 MHz band
shall: “(1) not cause harmful interference to, nor claim protection from, ARNS systems operating in accordance with
international aeronautical standards; (2) at a minimum, meet the FM broadcasting immunity requirements for
existing ARNS systems operating in this band; (3) place no additional constraints on the broadcasting service or
cause harmful interference to stations operating in the FM radio band; and (4) not use frequencies below 112 MHz,
except for ground-based DGPS stations.”
65 Specifically, we note that this primary AM(R)S allocation was principally a European initiative, that the
U.S. proposed no change for the 108-117.975 MHz band, and that this band was “not part of current FAA plans.”
See “Spectrum Issues and WRC-07 Preparation,” FAA presentation, May 3, 2007, p. 9.
66 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 2 (revised text of US343) and 14 (modifications to the
108-117.975 MHz band). We note that NTIA recommends removing the last sentence from US343 (i.e., “Such use
shall be in accordance with ITU Resolution 413 (WRC-03)”) because Resolution 413 does not apply to the
1559-1610 MHz band.
67 47 C.F.R. § 73.201.
68 See ITU Radio Regulations, Resolution 413 (Rev.WRC-07), titled “Use of the band 108-117.975 MHz by the
aeronautical mobile (R) service” at noting c) and noting d).
69 See “Safe, Efficient Use and Preservation of the Navigable Airspace,” Department of Transportation, FAA,
75 FR 42296 (July 21, 2010) (Final Rule) (stating that “the proposals on FM broadcast service transmissions in the
88.0–107.9 MHz frequency band remain pending,” and that “the FAA will address the … proposed frequency notice
requirements … when a formal and collaborative decision is announced”).
70 ICAO is a specialized agency of the United Nations that was created in 1944 to promote the safe and orderly
development of international civil aviation throughout the world. ICAO sets standards and regulations necessary for
aviation safety, security, efficiency and regularity, as well as for aviation environmental protection. ICAO serves as
the forum for cooperation in all fields of civil aviation among its 191 Member States.
See http://www.icao.int/Pages/icao-in-brief.aspx.
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(ILS) localizer, VOR, and VHF communications receivers.71 For these reasons, we tentatively find that
the text of RR 5.197A needs to be augmented to ensure that the ability of FM radio stations to broadcast
digital signals along with their analog signals (i.e., implementation of HD Radio technology) is not
hindered by the need to protect this new proposed AM(R)S allocation. Accordingly, we propose to add
new U.S. footnote US197A to the 108-117.975 MHz band, which is based on the text of RR 5.197A,
coupled with the following proposed sentence: AM(R)S use of the band 108-117.975 MHz shall not
constrain the use of the band 88-108 MHz by stations in the broadcasting service operating in accordance
with 47 CFR Part 73.72 See Appendix D for proposed U.S. footnote US197A. We seek comment on this
proposal. In particular, we seek comment on the advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and
benefits associated with changing our rules.
29.
We also propose revising and renumbering footnote US343. Specifically, because we
propose to add new footnote US197A to the U.S. Table, we note that DGPS stations in the
108-117.975 MHz band should be authorized under the proposed AM(R)S allocation that would be
codified in US197A. Consequently, we propose to amend US343 (which currently authorizes DGPS
stations to operate in the 108-117.975 MHz and 1559-1610 MHz bands) by removing the
108-117.975 MHz band (which would be duplicative, if US197A is adopted) and by renumbering this
footnote in frequency order as US85.
2.

VHF Maritime Mobile Band (156-162 MHz)

a.
156.4875-156.5625 MHz
30.
Prior to WRC-07, the 150.05-156.7625 MHz band was allocated to the fixed and mobile
services on a primary basis in Regions 2 and 3.73 WRC-07 reallocated a 75 kilohertz band at
156.4875-156.5625 MHz to the maritime mobile service (MMS) on a primary basis in all ITU Regions
and restricted the use of this allocation to distress and calling via digital selective calling (DSC).74 NTIA
recommends that we implement this allocation decision in the U.S. Table.75 WRC-07 also expanded the
scope of RR 5.226 (which previously pertained only to 156.8 MHz) to include the designation of the
frequency 156.525 MHz (maritime VHF Channel 70) as the international distress, safety, and calling
frequency for the maritime mobile VHF radiotelephone service using DSC and added cross references to
specific provisions in the ITU Radio Regulations (Articles 31 and 52 and Appendix 18) for the conditions
that apply to the use of 156.525 MHz and the surrounding 75 kilohertz band. In particular, we note that
WRC-07 amended Appendix 18 to require that, when using the frequencies 156.500 MHz and
156.550 MHz (maritime VHF Channels 10 and 11, respectively), all precautions should be taken to avoid


71 See ANNEX 10 TO THE CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION (Aeronautical Telecommunications),
Volume 1 (Radio Navigation Aids), Sixth Edition (July 2006), Chapter 3, paragraphs 3.1.4 (ILS localizer) and 3.3.8
(VOR), and Volume III, Part II (Voice Communications Systems), Second Edition (July 2007), paragraph 2.3.3
(VHF communications).
72 We have added this sentence to highlight resolves 3 in Resolution 413, i.e., “that additional aeronautical systems
[i.e., AM(R)S stations] operating in the band 108-117.975 MHz shall place no additional constraints on the
broadcasting service or cause harmful interference to stations operating in the bands allocated to the broadcasting
service in the frequency band 87-108 MHz.” See Resolution 413 (Rev.WRC-07), resolves 3.
73 The mobile service is a radiocommunication service between mobile and land stations or between mobile stations.
47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c). In Region 1, the 154-156.7625 MHz band was allocated to the fixed and mobile except
aeronautical mobile (R) services on a primary basis.
74 DSC is a synchronous system used to establish contact with a station or group of stations automatically by means
of radio. See Recommendations ITU-R M.493-13 (10/09), titled “Digital selective-calling system for use in the
maritime mobile service,” and ITU-R M.541-9 (05/04), titled “Operational procedures for the use of digital
selective-calling equipment in the maritime mobile service.” 47 C.F.R. § 80.5.
75 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 16-17.
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harmful interference to maritime VHF Channel 70.76 WRC-07 also adopted RR 5.227,77 which allocates
the 156.4875-156.5125 MHz and 156.5375-156.5625 MHz bands (i.e., the 25 kilohertz bands that are
designated as maritime VHF Channels 10 and 11, respectively) to the fixed and land mobile services on a
primary basis, subject to not causing harmful interference to, nor claiming protection from, the VHF
MMS.78
31.
In the U.S. Table, the 156.2475-156.7625 MHz band is allocated to the MMS on a primary
basis for non-Federal use.79 NG124 states that police licensees are authorized to operate low power
transmitters in the 156.2475-156.25 MHz sub-band on a secondary basis, and NG117 states that the
frequency 156.25 MHz may be assigned to MMS stations for port operations in the New Orleans and
Houston Vessel Traffic Service areas. Placeholder footnote US226 contains the national designation of
VHF Channel 70 (156.525 MHz) for DSC, using pre-WRC-07 text from RR 5.227 (now numbered as
RR 5.226).80 US106 states that the frequency 156.75 MHz is available for assignment for environmental
communications in accordance with an agreed plan.81


76 See ITU Radio Regulations, Appendix 18 (Rev.WRC-07), titled “Table of transmitting frequencies in the VHF
maritime mobile band,” specific note q).
77 Specifically, RR 5.227 reads as follows: “Additional allocation: the bands 156.4875-156.5125 MHz and
156.5375-156.5625 MHz are also allocated to the fixed and land mobile services on a primary basis. The use of
these bands by the fixed and land mobile services shall not cause harmful interference to nor claim protection from
the maritime mobile VHF radiocommunication service. (WRC-07)”
78 The land mobile service is a mobile service between base stations and land mobile stations or between land
mobile stations. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
79 On February 21, 2012, there were 1,427 call signs that authorize non-Federal operations in the
156.4875-156.5625 MHz band, with 1,407 of these call signs issued to licensees in the Coastal Group (MC) Radio
Service. In addition, our rules permit domestic-only operation of most ship stations without a specific station
license, i.e., these ship stations are licensed-by-rule. Our proposal will not affect either of these types of MMS
operations. The other 20 call signs authorize licensees to operate stations in the land mobile service. See
Appendix B for additional information. Under the proposed re-allocation of the 156.5125-156.5375 MHz band,
stations in the land mobile service would continue to operate but would be subject to coordination with NTIA upon
renewal or proposed modification. In Table 1, below, we show the current number of non-Federal MC call signs
(February 21, 2012 ULS search) and Federal assignments (February 4, 2012 Government Master File search) that
authorized operations on the three frequencies in this 75-kilohertz band that are listed in Appendix 18 of the ITU
Radio Regulations.

Table 1: MMS Use of Three Channels in the 156.4875-156.5625 MHz Band

Frequency
Channel
Uses per ITU Appendix 18
Non-Federal
Federal
156.500 MHz
10
Port operations & ship movement, inter-ship
1,057
31
156.525 MHz
70
DSC for distress, safety & calling
*88
310
156.550 MHz
11
Port operations & ship movement
311
45
*Section 80.359(a)-(b) authorizes ship and coast stations to transmit on VHF Channel 70 for DSC even if the
frequency is not listed on their license.
80 Prior to WRC-07, RR 5.227 stated that the frequency 156.525 MHz is to be used exclusively for DSC for distress,
safety, and calling. WRC-07 modified the text of RR 5.227 slightly, combined it with the modified text of
RR 5.226, and then reused the footnote number 5.227 for a new allocation. WRC-07 also revised Appendix 18 of
the ITU Radio Regulations to require that all precautions be taken to avoid harmful interference to the frequency
156.525 MHz when using the adjacent frequencies (156.500 and 156.550 MHz). In the WRC-07 Table Clean-up
Order
, we moved this allocation to placeholder footnote US226. See WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order,
25 FCC Rcd at 9724 para. 25.
81 The frequency 156.75 MHz is available for assignment to coast stations, the use of which is in accord with an
agreed program, for the broadcast of information to ship stations concerning the environmental conditions in which
(continued…)
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32.
Federal use of the 156.2475-156.7625 MHz band is limited to that specified in US77,
US106, and US226. US77 states, inter alia, that Federal stations may also be authorized as follows:
(a) Port operations use on a simplex basis by coast and ship stations of the frequencies 156.6 MHz and
156.7 MHz; (b) Inter-ship use of 156.3 MHz on a simplex basis; (c) Vessel traffic services under the
control of the U.S. Coast Guard on a simplex basis by coast and ship stations on the frequencies 156.25,
156.55, 156.6 and 156.7 MHz; and (d) Navigational bridge-to-bridge and navigational communications
on a simplex basis by coast and ship stations on the frequencies 156.375 MHz and 156.65 MHz.
33.
We propose to amend the U.S. Table to divide 156.2475-156.7625 MHz into three bands
(156.2475-156.5125 MHz, 156.5125-156.5375 MHz, and 156.5375-156.7625 MHz), to allocate the new
156.5125-156.5375 MHz band to the MMS on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use, and to
restrict the use of that allocation to distress, urgency, safety, and calling via DSC.82 This action would
establish a 25 kilohertz band centered on maritime VHF Channel 70 (156.525 MHz) in the U.S. Table.
We believe that establishing a 25 kilohertz band for maritime VHF Channel 70 operations and
maintaining the more general MMS allocation for VHF Channels 10 and 11, instead of the 75 kilohertz
band that NTIA recommends, would better illustrate how the two 25 kilohertz bands adjacent to VHF
Channel 70 will continue to be used.
34.
We propose to allocate the 156.4875-156.5125 MHz and 156.5375-156.5625 MHz bands to
the fixed and land mobile services on a primary basis for non-Federal use, subject to not causing harmful
interference to, nor claiming protection from, the maritime mobile VHF radiocommunication service. We
propose to restrict the licensing of this spectrum to the area consisting of VHF Public Coast Station Areas
(VPCSAs) 10-42.83 If adopted, we would codify these proposals in the Allocation Table by adding new
footnote US227 (which would be based on RR 5.227) to the U.S. Table. We solicit comment on this
proposal and on whether additional areas can be licensed while fully protecting VHF Channel 70
reception. For example, as an alternative or supplement to the inland VPCSA proposal, we request
comment on whether the height/power table in former Section 90.283(d) (1997 Edition of the C.F.R.)
(Continued from previous page)


vessels operate, i.e., weather; sea conditions; time signals; notices to mariners; and hazards to navigation.
47 C.F.R. § 80.373(f), note 13.
82 While the ITU Allocation Table lists “MARITIME MOBILE (distress and calling via DSC),” we have added
urgency and safety to the types of operations that are authorized because Article 52 (Special rules relating to the use
of frequencies) of the ITU Radio Regulations states that the “frequency 156.525 MHz is an international frequency
in the maritime mobile service used for distress, urgency, safety and calling by digital selective-calling techniques.”
See ITU Radio Regulations, Article 52 at No. 52.159.
83 VPCSAs consist of one or more of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s 172 Economic Areas (EAs), certain
insular areas, and the Gulf of Mexico. VPCSAs 1-9 encompass the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf coasts, as well as the
Great Lakes and the Mississippi River basin. VPCSAs 10-42 encompass a relatively smaller portion of the western
United States that includes all of 6 states (Arizona, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming) and portions
of 11 other states. See Section 80.371(c)(1)(ii) for the list of VPCSAs and their constituent EAs; Section 90.20(g)
for the frequencies that are currently available for PLMRS use; and
http://transition.fcc.gov/oet/info/maps/areas/maps/vpc.pdf for a map of the VPCSAs.

Table 2: Transmitting Frequencies (MHz) in the VHF Maritime Mobile Band

And Public Safety Use in VPCSAs 10-42

Channel
Ship station
Coast station
Remarks
10
156.500
Proposed for partial reallocation in this proceeding
70
156.525
Digital selective calling (DSC) for distress, safety, and calling
11
156.550
Proposed for partial reallocation in this proceeding
84
157.225
161.825
Formerly allocated and assigned for public safety use
25
157.250
161.850
Allocated for public safety use
85
157.275
161.875
Formerly assigned for public safety use; reallocated for maritime use
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should be used?84 We also solicit comment on appropriate spectrum that could be paired with these two
channels. We believe that our proposals set the stage for effective use of this spectrum. We note,
however, that we will leave the ultimate use of this 50 kilohertz of spectrum, and the procedures for
licensing this spectrum, for a future proceeding. Finally, we seek comment on the advantages and
disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated with changing our rules.
35.
WRC-07 added the frequency 156.525 MHz to RR 5.111, thereby making this frequency
available for search and rescue (SAR) operations concerning manned space vehicles in all ITU Regions.85
At the request of NTIA, we propose to add RR 5.111 to the U.S. Table in the bands that contain the
frequencies 156.525 MHz (Channel 70) and 156.800 MHz (Channel 16).
36.
We propose to simplify the U.S. Table by specifying various provisions that pertain to the
VHF maritime mobile band (156-162 MHz) in a new U.S. footnote, which we would number in
frequency order as US52, if adopted. Paragraph (a) of proposed footnote US52 would contain the text
from existing footnotes US77 and US106, respectively. Paragraph (b) of proposed footnote US52 would
contain part of the text from note f) in Appendix 18, thereby making the frequency 156.300 MHz
(Channel 06) available for use by aircraft stations for the purpose of SAR operations and other safety-
related communications.86 Paragraph (c) of proposed footnote US52 is based on the existing text from
note 18 of Section 80.373(f),87 except that, at the request of the U.S. Coast Guard, we propose to permit


84 In the 1997 Edition of the C.F.R., paragraphs (d) and (e) of Section 90.283 generally read as follows:
(d) The following table, along with the antenna height (HAAT) and power (ERP), must be used to determine the
minimum separation required between proposed base stations and each of the following:
(1) Co-channel public coast stations licensed under part 80 of this chapter,
(2) The coastline of any navigable waterway,
(3) Applicants whose exact ERP or HAAT are not reflected in the table must use the next highest figure shown.
REQUIRED SEPARATION IN KILOMETERS (MILES) OF BASE STATION FROM COASTLINES/PUBLIC COAST STATIONS
Base Station Characteristics
HAAT
ERP (watts)
Meters (feet)
400
300
200
100
50
15 (50)............................. 138 (86)
135 (84)
129 (80)
121 (75)
116 (72)
30 (100)........................... 154 (96)
151 (94)
145 (90)
137 (85)
130 (81)
61 (200)........................... 166 (103)
167 (104)
161 (100)
153 (95)
145 (90)
122 (400)......................... 187 (116)
177 (110)
183 (114)
169 (105)
159 (99)
(e) In the event of interference, the Commission may require, without a hearing, licensees of base stations
authorized under this section that are located within 241 kilometers (150 miles) of an existing, co-channel public
coast station, grandfathered co-channel public safety station or an international border to reduce radiated power,
decrease antenna height, and/or install directional antennas. Mobile stations must operate only within radio range of
their associated base station.
85 RR 5.111 reads as follows: “The carrier frequencies 2182 kHz, 3023 kHz, 5680 kHz, 8364 kHz and the
frequencies 121.5 MHz, 156.525 MHz, 156.8 MHz and 243 MHz may also be used, in accordance with the
procedures in force for terrestrial radiocommunication services, for search and rescue operations concerning manned
space vehicles. The conditions for the use of the frequencies are prescribed in Article 31. The same applies to the
frequencies 10003 kHz, 14993 kHz and 19993 kHz, but in each of these cases emissions must be confined in a band
of ± 3 kHz about the frequency.”
86 ITU Radio Regulations, Appendix 18 (Rev.WRC-07), specific note f).
87 This action would correct an error that occurred in the WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order, wherein the use of the
156.7625-156.8375 MHz band was restricted to distress, urgency, safety, and calling. See WRC-07 Table Clean-up
Order
, 25 FCC Rcd 9733. Note 18 of Section 80.373(f) reads as follows: “The frequencies 156.775 and
156.825 MHz are available for navigation-related port operations or ship movement only, and all precautions must
be taken to avoid harmful interference to channel 16. Transmitter output power is limited to 1 watt for ship stations,
(continued…)
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Federal ship and coast stations to operate on the navigation frequencies (156.775 MHz and 156.825 MHz)
on a primary basis.88 See Appendix D for the text of proposed footnote US52.
37.
We propose to re-insert RR 5.226 (previously numbered as RR 5.227) in the U.S. Table and
to delete placeholder footnote US226. The conditions for the use of maritime VHF Channels 10, 11, and
70 are specified in RR 5.226 by a cross reference to Appendix 18 of the ITU Radio Regulations. We
believe that the requirements of Appendix 18 (all precautions should be taken to avoid harmful
interference to maritime VHF Channel 70) and of paragraph (c) of proposed footnote US52 are sufficient
and that it is unnecessary and potentially confusing to establish the 75 kilohertz band requested by NTIA.
38.
Finally, we propose to correct two grammatical/typographical errors in the text of NG117
and to renumber that footnote in frequency order as NG22.89 We request comment on all of the proposals
in this section. We also seek information on the potential advantages and disadvantages of our proposed
rules and on other actions we could take. For example, would our proposal to establish a 25 kilohertz
band centered on maritime VHF Channel 70 affect incumbent users less than adopting the WRC-07
model of creating a 75 kilohertz-wide band and, if so, to what extent?

Table 3: Proposal for the 156.2475-156.7625 MHz Band

Existing U.S. Table
Proposed U.S. Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
156.2475-156.7625
156.2475-156.7625
156.2475-156.5125
156.2475-156.5125
MARITIME MOBILE US106
MARITIME MOBILE NG22
US226 NG117
5.226 US52 US227 US266
5.226 US52 US227 US266 NG124
156.5125-156.5375
MARITIME MOBILE (distress, urgency, safety and calling via DSC)
5.111 5.226 US266
156.5375-156.7625
156.5375-156.7625
MARITIME MOBILE
US77 US106 US226 US266
US77 US266 NG124
5.226 US52 US227 US266
5.226 US52 US227 US266
b.

Automatic Identification System (AIS)

39.
In the U.S. Table, the 161.9625-161.9875 MHz (AIS 1) and 162.0125-162.0375 MHz
bands (AIS 2) (together, the AIS Bands) are Federal/non-Federal shared bands that are allocated to the
MMS on an exclusive basis, and the use of this allocation is restricted to AIS transmissions,90 except that
certain non-Federal non-AIS stations may continue to operate in the AIS 1 Band for varying lengths of
time, as provided for in US228.91
(Continued from previous page)


and 10 watts for coast stations.” 47 C.F.R. § 80.373(f), Note 18.
88 The U.S. Coast Guard made this request during the coordination process.
89 Specifically, we would replace the phrases “frequency 156.050 and 156.175 MHz” and “port operating” with the
phrases “frequencies 156.050 and 156.175 MHz” and “port operations,” respectively.
90 AIS is a maritime navigation safety communications system standardized by the ITU and adopted by the
International Maritime Organization (IMO) that provides vessel information, including the vessel’s identity, type,
position, course, speed, navigational status, and other safety-related information, automatically to appropriately
equipped shore stations, other ships, and aircraft; receives automatically such information from similarly fitted
ships; monitors and tracks ships; and exchanges data with shore-based facilities. 47 C.F.R. § 80.5.
91 US228 states that MMS use of the bands 161.9625-161.9875 MHz (AIS 1 with center frequency 161.975 MHz)
and 162.0125-162.0375 MHz (AIS 2 with center frequency 162.025 MHz) is restricted to AIS, except that
non-Federal stations in the band 161.9625-161.9875 MHz may continue to operate on a primary basis according to
(continued…)
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40.
WRC-07 adopted RR 5.227A, which states that the AIS Bands are also allocated to the
mobile-satellite service (MSS) (Earth-to-space) on a secondary basis for the reception of AIS emissions
from stations operating in the MMS. While the NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations do not address whether
RR 5.227A should be added to the U.S. Table, we note that the United States proposed that WRC-12
allocate the AIS Bands to the aeronautical mobile (off-route) service (AM(OR)S) and the MSS (Earth-to-
space) on a co-primary basis with the MMS, that the use of the AIS Bands by the AM(OR)S be restricted
to AIS emissions from search and rescue aircraft, that the use of the AIS Bands by the MMS and the MSS
(Earth-to-space) be restricted to AIS emissions, and that AIS operations shall not constrain the operation
of allocated services in adjacent bands.92 WRC-12 adopted these U.S. Proposals with minor changes.93
41.
We propose to add RR 5.227A to the 161.9625-161.9875 MHz and
162.0125-162.0375 MHz bands in the U.S. Table. In doing so, we wish to emphasize the secondary
status of satellite operations in these bands. In particular, licensees must be prepared to accept any
interference to the reception of mobile signals in the AIS Bands from the operations of adjacent-band
terrestrial services operating in accordance with the terms of their licenses. Finally, we propose to update
US228 by removing paragraph (c) and by renumbering the footnote as US228D (based on RR 5.228D).
We seek comment on the advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated with
changing our rules. In particular, we solicit comment on whether we should implement the WRC-12
allocation decisions with regard to the AIS 1 and AIS 2 bands.94

C.

UHF (300 to 3000 MHz) Allocations

1.

Radiolocation Use of 420-450 MHz

42.
The 420-450 MHz band is allocated to the radiolocation service (RLS) on a primary basis
for Federal use. US269 states that non-Federal pulse-ranging RLS systems may be authorized to operate
in the 420-450 MHz band along the shoreline of the conterminous United States and Alaska, that spread
(Continued from previous page)


the following schedule: (a) in VHF Public Coast Service Areas (VPCSAs) 1-9, site-based stations licensed prior to
November 13, 2006, may continue to operate until expiration of the license term for licenses in active status as of
November 13, 2006; (b) in VPCSAs 10-42, site-based stations licensed prior to March 2, 2009, may continue to
operate until March 2, 2024; and (c) in VPCSAs 10-42, geographical stations licensed prior to March 2, 2009, may
continue to operate until March 2, 2011. See 47 C.F.R. 80.371(c)(1)(ii) for the definitions of VPCSAs and
geographic license.
92 In making this proposal, the United States provided the following reasons: “Proposed changes reflect the
allocation and use of AIS frequencies to the required services in Article 5 to support maritime safety requirements.
The proposal that AM(OR)S has primary status and the upgrade to primary status of MSS (Earth-to-space) is
necessary due to a pending IMO [International Maritime Organization] decision to include a distress alert
notification within the AIS position message report.” See U.S. Contributions Sent to WRC-12, First Tranche
(Feb. 17, 2011), Agenda item 1.10, ADD USA/AI 1.10/2, (available at http://transition.fcc.gov/ib/wrc-
12/us/1st_Tranche.pdf) (U.S. WRC-12 Proposals).
93 In the U.S. WRC-12 Proposals, the AIS use restrictions were specified in two footnotes (5.A01 and 5.A02).
WRC-12 adopted the intent of these footnotes in RR 5.228C, which reads as follows: “The use of the frequency
bands 161.9625-161.9875 MHz and 162.0125-162.0375 MHz by the maritime mobile service and the
mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space) service is limited to the automatic identification system (AIS). The use of these
frequency bands by the aeronautical mobile (OR) service is limited to AIS emissions from search and rescue aircraft
operations. The AIS operations in these frequency bands shall not constrain the development and use of the fixed
and mobile services operating in the adjacent frequency bands.” WRC-12 also adopted RR 5.228D, which
grandfathers primary FS and MS use of the AIS 1 and AIS 2 bands until January 1, 2025. See WRC-12 Final Acts at
p. 19 (RR 5.228C and RR 5.228D).
94 In order to implement the WRC-12 allocation decisions for ITU Region 2 in the common U.S. Table entries for the
AIS bands (161.9625-161.9875 MHz and 162.0125-162.0375 MHz), we would add the AM(OR)S and the MSS
(Earth-to-space) on a co-primary basis with the MMS (AIS), add references to RR 5.228C, remove the references to
RR 5.266, and revise (by removing unneeded text) and renumber US228 as US228D (based on RR 5.228D).
20

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spectrum RLS systems may be authorized to operate in the 420-435 MHz sub-band within the
conterminous United States and Alaska, and that operations proposed to be located within the areas listed
in paragraph (a) of US270 should not expect to be accommodated.95
43.
In 2003, the Commission expanded the area in New Mexico in which spread spectrum
radiolocation systems in the 420-435 MHz sub-band should not expect to be accommodated.96 We note
that Section 1.924(f) has not been updated to reflect that allocation action. In addition, the coordinates for
several of the areas listed in Section 1.924(f) do not exactly correspond to the coordinates specified in
paragraph (a) of US270. Accordingly, we propose to amend the quiet zone rules in Section 1.924(f) to
reflect the areas listed in paragraph (a) of US270, to limit its applicability to RLS systems, and to move
the revised text from paragraph (f) to paragraph (e).97 See Appendix D for the proposed text of
Section 1.924(e). We request comment on this proposal.
2.

Mobile Meter Reading Use of 928-960 MHz

44.
NG120 currently reads as follows: “Frequencies in the band 928-960 MHz may be assigned
for multiple address systems and mobile operations on a primary basis as specified in 47 CFR part 101.”
Section 101.101 (Frequency availability) lists multiple address systems (MAS) in the 928-929 MHz,
932-932.5 MHz, 941-941.5 MHz, 952-958 MHz, and 958-960 MHz bands.98 We note that the “mobile
operations” referred to in NG120 are “mobile meter reading operations.”99 Accordingly, we propose to
amend NG120 by revising “band 928-960 MHz” and “mobile operations” to “bands 928-929 MHz,
932-932.5 MHz, 941-941.5 MHz, and 952-960 MHz” and “associated mobile operations,” respectively,
by deleting the phrase “as specified in 47 CFR part 101,” and by renumbering this footnote in frequency
order as NG35. See Appendix D for the text of proposed text of NG35. We request comment on this
proposal.
3.

Additional Aeronautical Use of 960-1164 MHz

45.
In the U.S. Table, the 960-1164 MHz band is currently allocated to the aeronautical
radionavigation service (ARNS) on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use. RR 5.328 states that
ARNS use of the 960-1215 MHz band is reserved on a worldwide basis for the operation and
development of airborne aids to air navigation and any directly associated ground-based facilities. US224
states that Federal systems using spread spectrum techniques for terrestrial communication, navigation,


95 As of February 22, 2012, there was one non-Federal RLS licensee operating in the 420-435 MHz sub-band and
one non-Federal RLS licensee operating in the 435-450 MHz sub-band.
96 Specifically, the Commission modified paragraph (a) in US7 and US228 from “Those portions of Texas and New
Mexico bounded on the south by latitude 31° 45' North, on the east by longitude 104° 00' West, on the north by
latitude 34° 30' North, and on the west by longitude 107° 30' West” to “The entire State of New Mexico and Texas
west of longitude 104o 00' West.” See Amendment of Parts 2, 25, and 87 of the Commission's Rules to Implement
Decisions from World Radiocommunication Conferences Concerning Frequency Bands Between 28 MHz and
36 GHz and to Otherwise Update the Rules in this Frequency Range, ET Docket No. 02-305, Report and Order,
18 FCC Rcd 23426, 23429, 23449-51 paras. 6, 60-64 (2003) (FCC 03-269). At that time, US217 contained a cross
reference to the areas listed in US228. Subsequently, the WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order replaced the geographic
areas listed in US217 with a cross reference to paragraph (a) of US270 and renumbered US217 as US269. See
WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order
, 25 FCC Rcd at 9735-36 paras. 61-62.
97 In paragraphs 92-94, infra, we propose to revise Section 1.924(e), which pertains to the 17.7-19.7 GHz band. By
moving the revised text of paragraph (f) in Section 1.924 to paragraph (e), we would place these rules in frequency
order.
98 47 C.F.R. § 101.101.
99 Amendment of §§ 22.501(g)(2) and 94.65(a)(1) of the Rules and Regulations to Re-Channel the 900 MHz
Multiple Address Frequencies, PR Docket No. 87-5, Report and Order, 3 FCC Rcd 1564, 1568 paras. 36-39 (1988).
21

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and identification may be authorized to operate in the 960-1215 MHz band on the condition they do not
cause harmful interference to the ARNS. US400 states that the use of the center frequency 978 MHz may
be authorized to Universal Access Transceiver (UAT) stations on a primary basis for the specific purpose
of transmitting datalink information in support of the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast
(ADS-B) Service,100 Traffic Information Services-Broadcast (TIS-B), and Flight Information-Broadcast
(FIS-B).101
46.
WRC-07 allocated the 960-1164 MHz band to the aeronautical mobile (route) service
(AM(R)S) on a primary basis and also adopted RR 5.327A, which restricts the use of this AM(R)S
allocation to systems that operate in accordance with recognized international aeronautical standards and
with Resolution 417.102
47.
NTIA supports WRC-07’s AM(R)S allocation. In its discussion of the 960-1164 MHz
band, NTIA notes congestion in specific portions of that band.103 NTIA states that, based on this
congestion, particularly at 1030 MHz and 1090 MHz, it expects any new proposed AM(R)S operations in
this spectrum will be carefully reviewed both domestically and internationally to ensure compatibility
with existing and planned systems consistent with the terms of ITU Resolution 417. Until such reviews
determine the compatibility of new AM(R)S applications, NTIA states that it will limit Federal AM(R)S
use of the 960-1164 MHz band to the ICAO-standard UAT stations and 1090 MHz Extended Squitter
(ES).104
48.
The 960-1164 MHz band is an important component of the FAA’s Next Generation Air
Transportation System (NextGen).105 To provide spectrum support for NextGen, NTIA recommends that
we: 1) allocate the 960-1164 MHz band to the AM(R)S on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal
use; 2) add RR 5.327A to the U.S. Table; and 3) remove US400 from the list of U.S. footnotes.106 We
note that, at the request of NTIA, the Commission has proposed to authorize aeronautical utility mobile


100 ADS-B consists of two different services: ADS-B Out and ADS-B In. ADS-B Out periodically broadcasts
information about each aircraft, such as identification, current position, altitude, and velocity, through an onboard
transmitter. ADS-B In refers to an appropriately equipped aircraft’s ability to receive and display another aircraft’s
ADS-B Out information as well as the ADS-B In services provided by ground systems, including TIS-B and FIS-B.
See Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Out Performance Requirements To Support Air Traffic
Control (ATC) Service, Docket No. FAA-2007-29305, 75 FR 30160, 30161-62 (May 28, 2010) (ADS-B Out Rule).
101 In Part 87, the emission F1D is authorized only for UAT use on 978 MHz. The authorized bandwidth for UAT
use is 1,300 kilohertz. 47 C.F.R. § 87.137(a).
102 Resolution 417 resolves, inter alia, that any AM(R)S systems operating in the 960-1164 MHz band shall not
cause harmful interference to, nor claim protection from, and shall not impose constraints on the operation and
planned development of ARNS systems in the same band. See para. 61, supra, for the U.S. proposal for
WRC-07 and ICAO’s recommendations for this band.
103 See NTIA WRC-07 Supplement at 1.
104 “Squitter” refers to random output pulses from a transponder caused by ambient noise or by an intentional
random triggering system but not by the interrogation pulses.
105 NextGen is an umbrella term for the ongoing transformation of the National Airspace System (NAS). At its most
basic level, NextGen represents an evolution from a ground-based system of air traffic control (i.e., radar) to a
satellite-based system of air traffic management (i.e., GPS). See http://www.faa.gov/nextgen/.
106 See NTIA WRC-07 Supplement at 2.
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stations to operate on 1090 MHz107 and that the FAA adopted a final rule that requires the use of
1090 MHz for ADS-B under certain circumstances on January 1, 2020.108
49.
We propose to amend the U.S. Table to add a primary AM(R)S allocation for
Federal/non-Federal use to the 960-1164 MHz band and to also adopt NTIA’s other recommendations.
Specifically, we propose to add RR 5.327A to the U.S. Table, which would require that any AM(R)S
systems operating in the 960-1164 MHz band not cause harmful interference to, claim protection from, or
impose constraints on ARNS systems operating in that band. In addition, because many of the evolving
navigation and surveillance applications that are expected to operate in these ARNS bands may not meet
the ITU definition of a radionavigation service, these new AM(R)S allocations would also allow those
applications to use the 960-1164 MHz band.109
50.
We note that UAT stations that transmit datalink information on 978 MHz in support of the
ADS-B, TIS-B, and FIS-B services can be authorized under the proposed AM(R)S allocation in the
960-1164 MHz band. Therefore, we also propose to delete US400, which would then be duplicative of
the broader AM(R)S allocation. We seek comment on the advantages and disadvantages, and other costs
and benefits associated with changing our rules.
51.
We also observe that, under an FAA contract, ITT Corporation (ITT) “will build and own
an estimated 794 ground stations” to provide the FAA with ADS-B service using 978 MHz and
1090 MHz.110 The services that ITT will provide directly to the FAA under this contract are an integral
part of the FAA’s NextGen initiative, which represents “a comprehensive overhaul of our National
Airspace System.”111 NTIA considers such spectrum use a federal use of spectrum under its jurisdiction,
and it plans to assign these frequencies to the FAA. The FAA, in turn, would employ ITT as a contractor
to provide the FAA with spectrum services over these frequencies, pursuant to contractual terms that
reserve for the FAA sufficient control over the system to be considered its operator. The contract,
however, would also provide that ITT can use the UAT (978 MHz) system’s excess capacity to sell


107 Amendment of the Commission’s Rules Governing Certain Aviation Ground Station Equipment, WT Docket
No. 10-61, Notice of Proposed Rule Making, 25 FCC Rcd 3355 (2010) (FCC 10-37).
108 Specifically, the FAA, in adopting this rule, stated that ADS-B requires a broadcast link for aircraft surveillance
to support ADS-B In applications. Operators have two options under this rule – the 1090 MHz ES broadcast link or
the UAT broadcast link. The 1090 MHz ES broadcast link is the internationally agreed upon link for ADS-B and is
intended to support ADS-B In applications used by air carriers and other high-performance aircraft. The 1090 MHz
ES broadcast link does not support FIS-B (weather and related flight information) because the bandwidth limitations
of this link preclude transmission of the large message structures required by that service. The UAT broadcast link
supports ADS-B In applications and FIS-B, which are important for the general aviation community. This final rule
requires aircraft flying at and above 18,000 feet mean sea level (MSL) to have ADS-B Out performance capabilities
using the 1090 MHz ES broadcast link. This rule also specifies that aircraft flying in the designated airspace below
18,000 feet MSL may use either the 1090 MHz ES or UAT broadcast link. See ADS-B Out Rule, 75 FR at 30163.
109 In general, the definition of a radionavigation service calls for the determination of position and velocity by
means of the propagation properties of radio waves. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c). See footnote 132, infra.
110 See “The ITT essential services architecture” at http://www.itt.com/adsb/solution.html. See also Press Release –
FAA Selects ITT Corporation for Satellite-Based Air Traffic Control System, released Aug. 30, 2007 (available at
http://www.faa.gov/news/press_releases/news_story.cfm?newsId=9452). See also REPORT FROM THE ADS-B
RULEMAKING COMMITTEE TO THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, Recommendations on Federal Aviation
Administration Notice No. 7-15, Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Out Performance
Requirements to Support Air Traffic Control (ATC) Service; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, September 26, 2008,
page D-1 (stating that, under the FAA’s contract, “the vendor will install, own, and maintain the equipment.”)
(available at http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=FAA-2007-29305-0221). For more information on
ITT’s role in ADS-B engineering and integration, see http://www.itt.com/adsb/itt-role.html.
111 See “Why NextGen Matters” at http://www.faa.gov/nextgen/why_nextgen_matters/.
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“value-added services” to commercial customers (subject to revenue sharing with the FAA), which has
been identified as “an essential element of the business model for the contractor.”112 This use of spectrum
would not be covered by NTIA’s federal spectrum authorization to the FAA. Accordingly, it appears that
under Section 103(e)(1)(A) of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration
Organization Act,113 ITT would need to obtain a license from the Commission before providing these
value-added services, notwithstanding NTIA’s request that we add an AM(R)S allocation.114 What steps
could we take to aid the FAA in accomplishing its important NextGen objectives and what would be the
advantages and disadvantages of each?
4.

Feeder Link Allocations near 1.4 GHz

52.
In the U.S. Table, the 1390-1392 MHz (Earth-to-space) and 1430-1432 MHz (space-to-
Earth) bands are allocated to the fixed-satellite service (FSS) on a secondary basis in the non-Federal
Table.115 US368 limits the use of these FSS allocations to feeder links for the Non-Voice
Non-Geostationary Mobile-Satellite Service (NVNG MSS, commonly referred to as “Little LEOs”).116 It
also provides that such use is contingent on the completion of ITU-R compatibility studies and places
various restrictions on the use of the Little LEO feeder link allocations. To protect passive service
reception in the 1400-1427 MHz band, US398 prohibits airborne and space-to-Earth operations in the
1390-1400 MHz and 1427-1432 MHz bands, except for Little LEO feeder downlinks. US37 states that
all Federal operations in the 1390-1400 MHz and 1427-1432 MHz bands (except for devices authorized
by the Commission for use in the Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS)) are on a
non-interference basis to non-Federal operations.
53.
RR 5.339 states that the 1370-1400 MHz, 2640-2655 MHz, 4950-4990 MHz, and
15.20-15.35 GHz bands are also allocated to the Earth exploration-satellite service (EESS) (passive) and
space research service (SRS) (passive) (together, passive sensors) on a secondary basis.117 WRC-03


112 In its 2007 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, the FAA noted that ADS-B provides “a platform for services that
may be developed in the future by the FAA or by independent vendors.” See Automatic Dependent Surveillance—
Broadcast (ADS-B) Out Performance Requirements To Support Air Traffic Control (ATC) Service
, Notice of
Proposed Rulemaking, 72 F.R. 56947, 56961 (Oct. 5, 2007). Subsequently, ITT and the FAA indicated that they are
planning to offer certain data services to commercial customers, pursuant to a revenue-sharing agreement in their
contract. See “Surveillance and Broadcast Services ADS-B Certification Workshop,” (FAA, November 21, 2007) at
46 (available at http://www.eurocontrol.int/cascade/gallery/content/public/documents/cascade%20palma/ADS-
B%20Certification%20Workshop_FAA_11-20-07_FINAL.pdf).
113 See 47 U.S.C. § 903(e)(1)(A) (“[N]o person or entity (other than an agency or instrumentality of the United
States) shall be permitted ... to operate a radio station utilizing a frequency that is authorized for the use of
government stations ... for any non-government application unless such person has submitted to the NTIA proof ...
that such person or entity has obtained a license from the Commission.”).
114 NTIA’s request, by itself, is not sufficient to address the use of the 960-1164 MHz band under the FAA’s
contract with ITT.
115 The fixed-satellite service is a radiocommunication service between earth stations at given positions, when one or
more satellites are used; the given position may be a specified fixed point or any fixed point within specified areas;
in some cases this service includes satellite-to-satellite links, which may also be operated in the inter-satellite
service; the fixed-satellite service may also include feeder links for other space radiocommunication services.
47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
116 Feeder link is defined as a radio link from an earth station at a given location to a space station, or vice versa,
conveying information for a space radiocommunication service other than for the fixed-satellite service. The given
location may be at a specified fixed point, or at any fixed point within specified areas. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
117 The EESS is a radiocommunication service between earth stations and one or more space stations, which may
include links between space stations, in which: (1) information relating to the characteristics of the Earth and its
natural phenomena is obtained from active sensors or passive sensors on earth satellites; (2) similar information is
(continued…)
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adopted RR 5.339A, which stated that the 1390-1392 MHz band is also allocated to the
FSS (Earth-to-space) on a secondary basis and that the 1430-1432 MHz band is also allocated to the
FSS (space-to-Earth) on a secondary basis; that use of these allocations is limited to feeder links for
non-geostationary satellite orbit systems in the mobile-satellite service (MSS) with service links below
1 GHz (Little LEO feeder links); and that Resolution 745 (WRC-03) applies. Resolution 745 stated that
the Little LEO feeder link allocations “shall not be used until the completion of ITU-R studies on all
identified compatibility issues as shown in Annex 1 of this Resolution and the results of these studies
shall be reported to WRC-07 and the decisions should be taken by WRC-07 accordingly.”118 Because the
ITU-R studies were not completed, WRC-07 suppressed RR 5.339A (i.e., removed this international
footnote from the ITU Allocation Table) and abrogated Resolution 745.119
54.
In its WRC-07 Proposals, the United States proposed that WRC-07 suppress RR 5.339A,
stating that: “Suppression of the conditional allocation to the FSS for non-GSO-MSS feeder links is
warranted due to lack of need for such an allocation and the sharing and/or compatibility difficulties with
existing services using the allocated bands or the nearby passive band.”120 NTIA recommends that we
delete US368 and the Little LEO feeder link allocations from the non-Federal Table and that we revise
US398 by deleting the Little LEO feeder link exception.121
55.
We propose to conform the U.S. Table to the 2008 ITU Radio Regulations by removing the
non-Federal FSS allocations from the 1390-1392 MHz and 1430-1432 MHz bands and by removing
US368 from the list of U.S. footnotes. Under our proposal, Little LEO licensees would continue to be
able to operate their service and feeder links in the 137-138 MHz, 148-150.05 MHz, 399.9-400.05 MHz,
and 400.15-401 MHz bands.122 We seek comment on the specific advantages and disadvantages of this
proposal. We would also create a new footnote, US79, which would combine the text of US37 and the
portion of US398 that prohibits airborne and space-to-Earth operations. We would then remove US37
and US398 from the list of U.S. footnotes and revise US74 to remove the phrase “(see US368).”123 We
request comment on these proposals. In particular, we seek comment on the advantages and
disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated with changing our rules.
5.

Aeronautical Mobile Telemetry Use of 2310-2320 MHz and 2345-2360 MHz

56.
The Wireless Communications Service (WCS) operates in the 2305-2320 MHz and
2345-2360 MHz bands, and Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service (SDARS) operates in the
(Continued from previous page)


collected from airborne or earth-based platforms; (3) such information may be distributed to earth stations within the
system concerned; and (4) may include platform interrogation. The SRS is a radiocommunication service in which
spacecraft or other objects in space are used for scientific or technological research purposes. A passive sensor is a
measuring instrument in the EESS or in the SRS by means of which information is obtained by reception of radio
waves of natural origin. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
118 See WRC-03 Final Acts at Resolution 745, resolves 1.
119 See ITU Radio Regulations, Resolution 97 (WRC-07), wherein Resolution 745 was abrogated as of
November 17, 2007.
120 See U.S. Proposals for WRC-07, Agenda item 1.17, at 61-64.
121 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 2 (showing modification of US74 and deletion of US368), at 4
(showing modification of US398), and at 27 (showing modification of the 1390-1392 MHz, 1392-1395 MHz,
1429.5-1430 MHz, and 1430-1432 MHz bands).
122 See 47 C.F.R. §§ 25.201 (defining the NVNG MSS to include “satellite links between land earth stations at fixed
locations”) and 25.202(a)(3) (listing the bands available for use by the NVNG MSS).
123 These changes are shown in Appendix D, including the amendatory instructions for and revisions to the
Allocation Table.
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2320-2345 MHz band.124 US339 states that the 2310-2320 and 2345-2360 MHz bands are also available
for aeronautical telemetering (hereafter, aeronautical mobile telemetry, or AMT)125 and associated
telecommand operations for flight testing of aircraft, missiles, and their major components on a secondary
basis to the WCS and that two frequencies (2312.5 MHz and 2352.5 MHz) are available to Federal and
non-Federal stations for telemetry and telecommand operations of expendable and reusable launch
vehicles. There are no non-Federal AMT licensees operating in the 2310-2320 MHz band, and there are
only three non-Federal AMT licensees operating in the 2345-2360 MHz band.126 There are no Federal or
non-Federal stations currently authorized to use the frequencies 2312.5 MHz and 2352.5 MHz for
telemetry or telecommand operations of expendable and reusable launch vehicles.
57.
We propose to delete the unused non-Federal AMT allocation in the 2310-2320 MHz band
from US339, to remove non-Federal access to two unused frequencies (2312.5 MHz and 2352.5 MHz)
that are available for telemetry or telecommand operations of expendable and reusable launch vehicles,
and to renumber US339 in frequency order as US100.127 We also propose to remove the 2310-2320 MHz
band from various sections in Part 87 of the Commission’s rules.128 We request comment on these
proposals. In particular, we seek comment on the advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and
benefits associated with changing our rules. For example, we believe that these actions would better
protect WCS in-band operations and SDARS adjacent band operations from interference. However, we
also recognize that commercial launch services may become more widely used over time, and
commenters may address this likelihood or suggest other reasons why we should nevertheless retain
access to the frequencies 2312.5 MHz and 2352.5 MHz.
58.
In addition, we solicit comment on whether we should delete the non-Federal AMT
allocation in 2345-2360 MHz band from US339, effective at the conclusion of an appropriate phase-in
period for the proposed new AMT band (5091-5150 MHz, which is discussed in paragraphs 61-67,
below), or whether we should grandfather the three existing licenses that authorize operations in the
2345-2360 MHz band indefinitely. If we decide to delete the AMT allocation from the 2345-2360 MHz
band, we solicit comment on whether a 5-year phase-out period would be sufficient for licensees to shift
their operations to the 5091-5150 MHz band. See Appendix D for the text of proposed footnote US100.


124 In the non-Federal Table, the 2305-2310 MHz band is allocated to the fixed, mobile except aeronautical mobile,
and radiolocation services on a primary basis and to the amateur service on a secondary basis; the 2310-2320 MHz
and 2345-2360 MHz bands are allocated to the broadcasting-satellite, fixed, mobile, and radiolocation services on a
primary basis; and the 2320-2345 MHz band is allocated to the broadcasting-satellite service on a primary basis. In
the Federal Table, the 2310-2320 MHz and 2345-2360 MHz bands are allocated to the fixed, mobile, and
radiolocation services on a secondary basis.
125 AMT is a mobile service (MS) for the flight testing of aircraft in which an aircraft station transmits the results of
measurements made onboard an aircraft, including those related to the functioning of the aircraft. Examples of
AMT data include engine temperature, fluid pressure, and control surface strain gauges. AMT operations are
primarily authorized in the 1435-1525 MHz, 2200-2290 MHz (Federal only), and 2360-2395 MHz bands.
126 For each of the call signs that authorize operations in the 2345-2360 MHz band, station class FMA1 (aircraft
flight test station) is listed. Call sign KA98091 authorizes Learjet Inc. to operate on 2350.5, 2355.5, and
2365.5 MHz within 200 miles of Wichita, Kansas, with necessary bandwidths of 3 and 4 megahertz and also with
17 megahertz on 2355.5 and 2365.5 MHz. Call sign WQHC922 authorizes Aviation Technology Group, Inc. to
operate on 2354.5 MHz within 320 km of Watkins, Colorado, with a necessary bandwidth of 15.6 megahertz.
Call sign WQKL973 authorizes The Boeing Company to operate on 2352 and 2357.5 MHz within 402 km of Seattle
and Moses Lake, Washington, and Glasgow, Montana, with necessary bandwidths of 8.12 and 13.4 megahertz.
127 During the coordination discussions, Commission staff suggested to NTIA that the two frequencies listed in
US339, which are shared on a co-equal basis by Federal and non-Federal stations for telemetering and associated
telecommand operations of expendable and re-usable launch vehicles whether or not such operations involve flight
testing (2312.5 and 2352.5 MHz), should be relocated into the 2360-2395 MHz band.
128 See paragraphs 68-77, below, for our consolidated proposal for amending Part 87 of the Commission’s rules.
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D.

SHF (3 to 30 GHz) Allocations

1.

Radio Astronomy Observatories in the 4 and 14 GHz Bands

59.
In the Federal Table, the 4800-4940 MHz and 14.47-14.5 GHz bands are allocated to the
fixed and the mobile services on a primary and secondary basis, respectively.129 US203 states that radio
astronomy service (RAS) observations of the 4825-4835 MHz (4 GHz) and 14.47-14.5 GHz (14 GHz)
bands may be made at certain RAS observatories, that every practicable effort will be made to avoid the
assignment of frequencies to stations in the fixed or mobile services in these bands, and that should such
assignments result in harmful interference to these observations, the situation will be remedied to the
extent practicable.130
60.
At NTIA’s request, we propose to update US203 and to renumber this footnote in
frequency order as US113. These modifications would be consistent with comments filed by the National
Academy of Sciences, through the National Research Council’s Committee on Radio Frequencies
(CORF), in IB Docket No. 07-101.131 We request comment on this proposal. We note that this proposal,
if adopted, would not affect non-Federal licensees or applicants (because the 4 and 14 GHz bands are not
allocated to the non-Federal fixed or mobile service).
2.
5091-5150 MHz
a.

New Aeronautical Mobile Service Band

61.
In the U.S. Table, the 5091-5150 MHz band is allocated to the aeronautical radionavigation
service (ARNS) on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use. US260 states that aeronautical
mobile communications that are an integral part of ARNS systems may be satisfied in the
5000-5250 MHz band. RR 5.367 states that the 5000-5150 MHz band is also allocated to the aeronautical
mobile-satellite (R) service on a primary basis. Placeholder footnote US444 (based on the pre-WRC-07
text of RR 5.444) states that the 5030-5150 MHz band is to be used for the operation of the international
standard system (microwave landing system, or MLS) for precision approach and landing and that MLS
requirements take precedence over other uses of this band. Placeholder footnote US444A (based on the
pre-WRC-07 text of RR 5.444A) states, inter alia, that the 5091-5150 MHz band is also allocated to the
fixed-satellite service (Earth-to-space) on a primary basis for non-Federal use; that this allocation is
limited to feeder links for non-geostationary satellite orbit systems in the mobile-satellite service (NGSO
MSS feeder links); that prior to January 1, 2018, MLS requirements that cannot be met in the
5000-5091 MHz band take precedence over other uses of the 5091-5150 MHz band; and that after
January 1, 2012, no new assignments shall be made to earth stations providing NGSO MSS feeder links.


129 US203 provides for the only non-Federal use of the 4825-4835 MHz band. In the non-Federal Table, the
14.47-14.5 GHz band is allocated to the fixed-satellite service (Earth-to-space) and to the mobile-satellite service
(Earth-to-space) on a primary and secondary basis, respectively.
130 US342 (which mirrors RR 5.149) states that in making assignments to stations of other services to which the
4825-4835 MHz band is allocated, all practicable steps shall be taken to protect the RAS from harmful interference.
131 Specifically, we propose to delete the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory and the Haystack Radio
Observatory from footnote US203, because these observatories no longer observe in the 4 GHz and 14 GHz bands.
Second, we would replace the Hat Creek Observatory with the Allen Telescope Array (which is also located at Hat
Creek, California) and would delete the reference to observations in the 14 GHz band from that entry in US203.
Third, we would add the ten VLBA stations, which are now listed in US385, to US203. Finally, we would add the
University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory, which is located at Stinchfield Woods, Michigan, and
observes in both the 4 GHz and 14 GHz bands, and the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute, which is located at
Rosman, North Carolina, and observes in the 4 GHz band, to US203. See Comments of the National Academy of
Sciences’ Committee on Radio Frequencies, IB Docket No. 07-101, received on Aug. 16, 2007, at 9 (CORF’s
VMES Comments).
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62.
In its Proposals for WRC-07, the United States stated that existing AM(R)S bands are
nearing saturation in high traffic areas, that new applications and concepts in air traffic management put
further pressure on existing AM(R)S bands, and that new technologies to support air navigation may not
conform to the definition of “aeronautical radionavigation” in the ITU Radio Regulations.132 The United
States noted that the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) determined new aviation systems
require two distinct categories of AM(R)S spectrum. The first category is for surface applications that
can support high data throughput over moderate transmission distances. Because of the required
transmission length, there could be a high degree of reuse of this spectrum. For surface applications, the
United States noted that ICAO recommended 5091-5150 MHz as a suitable band and stated that studies
have shown that AM(R)S can share with both the existing fixed-satellite service and possible aeronautical
mobile telemetry (AMT)133 systems in that band.134 The United States also noted that the second category
is for bidirectional air-to-ground applications that can support moderate data throughput over longer
propagation distances (out to radio line-of-sight). Because these applications would require a number of
distinct channels to allow for sector-to-sector assignments, ICAO recommended 960-1024 MHz as a
suitable band.
63.
WRC-07 allocated the 5091-5150 MHz band to the aeronautical mobile service (AMS) on a
primary basis. WRC-07 also adopted RR 5.444B, which restricts AMS use of the 5091-5150 MHz band
to: 1) AM(R)S systems operating in accordance with international aeronautical standards, limited to
surface applications at airports, and in accordance with Resolution 748;135 2) AMT transmissions from
aircraft stations in accordance with Resolution 418;136 and 3) aeronautical security transmissions in
accordance with Resolution 419.137 In addition, WRC-07 revised RR 5.444 and RR 5.444A by limiting


132 Radiodetermination is the determination of the position, velocity, and/or other characteristics of an object, or the
obtaining of information relating to these parameters, by means of the propagation properties of radio waves.
Radionavigation is radiodetermination used for the purposes of navigation, including obstruction warning. Thus, a
datalink cannot be authorized under the ARNS allocation. For this reason, the Commission adopted two
U.S. footnotes (US343, US400) that authorize certain datalink operations in two ARNS bands, which we address in
paragraphs 29 and 45, supra. See U.S. Proposals for WRC-07, at 18-19. See also CPM-07 Report, Agenda item 1.6,
Chapter 1 and at 61, Issues A, B and C (Resolution 414 (WRC-03)). The Commission adopted US343 and US400
in WT Docket No. 01-289 (Review of Part 87 of the Commission’s Rules Concerning the Aviation Radio Service).
Specifically, US343 was adopted in the Report and Order and Further Notice of Proposed Rule Making,
18 FCC Rcd 21432 (2003), and US400 was adopted in the Second Report and Order and Second Further Notice of
Proposed Rule Making
, 21 FCC Rcd 11582 (2006).
133 See footnote 125, supra, for AMT background information.
134 See U.S. Proposals for WRC-07, Proposals for Agenda item 1.6, Resolution 414, Background information, p. 18.
135 In Resolution 748, WRC-07 resolved that any AM(R)S systems operating in the 5091-5150 MHz band shall:
1) not cause harmful interference to, nor claim protection from, ARNS systems; and 2) meet the certain specified
international requirements to ensure compatibility with FSS systems operating in that band.
136 In Resolution 418, WRC-07 resolved that AMT applications shall be limited to flight testing in the
5091-5150 MHz band and shall utilize the criteria set forth in Annex 1 of that resolution. Resolution 418 states that
flight testing is for the testing of aircraft during non-commercial flights for the purpose of development, evaluation,
and/or certification of aircraft in airspace designated by administrations for this purpose. The criteria provide for the
protection of NGSO MSS feeder links in the 5091-5250 MHz band, e.g., the criteria require that aircraft station
transmitter power flux-density (pfd) be limited to -198.9 dB(W/(m² · Hz)) at the FSS satellite orbit for spacecraft
using Earth coverage receive antennas.
137 In Resolution 419, WRC-07 resolved that: 1) the use of AMS for aeronautical security applications is limited to
stations providing confidential radiocommunications intended for systems used in response to interruption of aircraft
operations that have not been permitted by the appropriate authorities; 2) such aeronautical applications shall be
designed to operate in accordance with Recommendation ITU-R M.1827; and 3) administrations, in making
assignments, shall ensure that AM(R)S requirements take precedence over AMS applications. We note that
(continued…)
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the band in which MLS use takes precedence over other uses to the 5030-5091 MHz band (i.e., by
deleting the requirement that MLS use takes precedence over other uses of the 5091-5150 MHz band) and
revised RR 5.444A by extending the date after which no new assignments may be made to earth stations
providing NGSO MSS feeder links by four years (to January 1, 2016).
64.
NTIA recommends that, in the 5091-5150 MHz band, we: 1) divide the combined
U.S. Table entry into separate Federal and non-Federal Table entries that would mirror the existing
entries, except that US444 (which provides MLS with precedence over other uses in this spectrum) would
be replaced by RR 5.444 in both the Federal and non-Federal Tables and US444A (which provides for a
non-Federal fixed-satellite service allocation) would be replaced by RR 5.444A in the non-Federal
Table;138 2) allocate the 5091-5150 MHz band to the aeronautical mobile service on a primary basis for
Federal and non-Federal use; and 3) add RR 5.444B and a new U.S. footnote listing 52 flight test areas,
which we tentatively number as US111, to the Federal and non-Federal Tables.139
65.
We propose to amend the U.S. Table to add a primary AMS allocation for
Federal/non-Federal use to the 5091-5150 MHz band and also to adopt NTIA’s other recommendations.
Specifically, we propose to add RR 5.444B to the U.S. Table, which would restrict AM(R)S operations in
the 5091-5150 MHz band to surface applications at airports, AMT transmissions, and aeronautical
security transmissions. We also propose to restrict AMT use of the 5091-5150 MHz band to the 52 flight
test areas listed in new footnote US111, except that additional locations may be authorized on a case-by-
case basis. We note, in particular, that the addition of RR 5.444B and US111 to the U.S. Table and the
adoption of appropriate service rules in Part 87 would permit AMT transmissions from aircraft stations in
the 5091-5150 MHz band to aeronautical (ground) stations on a primary basis for Federal and non-
Federal use at designated flight test areas, i.e., this proposal would make 59 megahertz available for AMT
use.140 In addition, because many of the evolving navigation and surveillance applications that are
expected to operate in these ARNS bands may not meet the ITU definition of a radionavigation service,
these new AM(R)S allocations would also allow those applications to use the 5091-5150 MHz band.141
We seek comment on these proposals. In particular, we seek comment on the advantages and
disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated with changing our rules.
66.
We further note that WRC-12 modified RR 5.444B by removing aeronautical security
transmissions from the list of AMS applications that are authorized to operate in the 5091-5150 MHz
band. Should we provide for aeronautical security transmissions through the adoption of a U.S. footnote
that would mirror the WRC-07 text from RR 5.444B, or should we instead add the WRC-12 version of
(Continued from previous page)


WRC-12 modified RR 5.444B by removing aeronautical security transmissions from the list of AMS applications
that are authorized to operate in the 5091-5150 MHz band and by revising Resolutions 418 and 748.
138 Because US444 and US444A would no longer be listed in the U.S. Table, we would remove these footnotes from
the list of U.S. footnotes.
139 Specifically, NTIA’s recommended footnote (shown in the NTIA Recommendations as USXX5 [1.5]) states that
in the 4400-4940 MHz, 5091-5150 MHz, and 5925-6700 MHz bands, AMT operations for flight testing are
conducted at 16 designated locations, which are defined using approximate coordinates (but no radius is listed).
Most of the locations include several test sites, which total 52 in number. In Appendix D, we number this proposed
footnote in frequency order as US111 and revise NTIA’s recommended text by not listing the 4400-4940 MHz and
5925-6700 MHz bands. Proposed footnote US111 also states that flight testing at additional locations may be
authorized on a case-by-case basis. See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 4 (recommended text for new footnote
US111) and 37 (modifications to the 5030-5091 MHz and 5091-5150 MHz bands).
140 See paragraphs 68-77, below, for our consolidated proposal for amending Part 87 of the Commission’s rules.
141 In general, the definition of a radionavigation service calls for the determination of position and velocity by
means of the propagation properties of radio waves. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c). See also footnote 132, supra.
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RR 5.444B to the U.S. Table? While we have drafted our proposed rules to reflect the latter course, we
seek comment on both options.
67.
We also propose to re-insert RR 5.444 and RR 5.444A into the U.S. Table and to remove
placeholder footnotes US444 and US444A from the list of U.S. footnotes.142 This action would remove
the precedence that the MLS use currently has over other uses of the 5091-5150 MHz band and would
extend the date after which no new assignments may be made to earth stations providing NGSO MSS
feeder links to January 1, 2016. If adopted, these actions would provide the allocation framework within
which AMT for flight testing of aircraft in the 5091-5150 MHz band would be conducted.
b.

Updating Service Rules for Aviation Services

68.
In this section, we propose to amend Part 87 of the Commission’s rules to bring the
proposed AMT allocation in the 5091-5150 MHz band into immediate effect and to remove all references
to the unused secondary AMT allocation in the 2310-2320 MHz band.143 We also propose to amend
Part 87 by removing all references to two previously deleted AMT bands (1525-1535 MHz and
2320-2345 MHz) and by listing a previously allocated AMT band (2390-2395 MHz, generally shown as
part of the larger 2345-2395 MHz band) in all appropriate rule sections.144 These proposed amendments
will result in the correct AMT bands – 1435-1525 MHz, 2345-2395 MHz, and 5091-5150 MHz – being
specified throughout Part 87, and are shown in Table 4, below, as “Update the AMT bands.” In addition,
we propose to amend six rule sections in Part 87 as follows:
69.
Section 87.5. Because the term “flight telemetry mobile stations” – which is used in US78
and Section 87.303(d)(1) – is not defined in the Commission’s rules, we propose to add the term “flight
telemetering mobile station” and its associated definition from NTIA’s Manual of Regulations and
Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management
(NTIA Manual) to the list of definitions in
Section 87.5 and to use this term in the affected rules.145 We also take the opportunity to propose to
clarify that five frequencies in the 1435-1525 MHz band (1444.5, 1453.5, 1501.5, 1515.5, and
1524.5 MHz) are shared with flight telemetering mobile stations “on a co-equal basis” with AMT
operations and to renumber US78 as US343 (based on RR 5.343).
70.
Section 87.133(f). We propose to amend Section 87.133(f) by specifying that the carrier
frequency tolerance of all transmitters operating in the 5091-5150 MHz band is 0.005 percent. This


142 This would also require that we replace US444 with RR 5.444 in the 5030-5091 MHz band. Otherwise, that band
is not affected by our proposals herein.
143 For the proposed deletion of the secondary AMT allocation from the 2310-2320 MHz band, see paragraph 56,
supra.
144 In 2003, the Commission deleted the secondary AMT allocations from the 1525-1535 MHz and 2320-2345 MHz
bands. Amendment of Parts 2, 25, and 87 of the Commission's Rules to Implement Decisions from World
Radiocommunication Conferences Concerning Frequency Bands Between 28 MHz and 36 GHz and to Otherwise
Update the Rules in this Frequency Range, ET Docket No. 02-305, Report and Order, 18 FCC Rcd 23426-27,
23432, 23434, 23443 paras. 2, 16, 17, 20, 40 (2003) (FCC 03-269). In 2004, the Commission re-allocated the
2385-2395 MHz band to the mobile service on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use and generally
limited the use of this allocation to AMT operations by adding this band to US276. (AMT use of the
2390-2395 MHz sub-band is shared on a co-primary basis with the amateur service.) Amendment of Part 2 of the
Commission’s Rules to Allocate Spectrum Below 3 GHz for Mobile and Fixed Services to Support the Introduction
of New Advanced Wireless Services, Including Third Generation Wireless Systems, ET Docket No. 00-258,
Seventh Report and Order, 19 FCC Rcd 21350, 21369-74 paras. 38-50 (2004) (FCC 04-246).
145 See NTIA Manual, Section 6.1.1, titled “Special Terms (General),” at page 6-7.
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proposal is based on an equivalent existing Federal requirement.146 We also propose to revise the existing
text to specify that the carrier frequency tolerance of all transmitters operating in the 1435-1525 MHz and
2345-2395 MHz bands is 0.002 percent. This will remove outdated references to a transition that
concluded in 1990.
71.
Section 87.173(b). As stated above, we propose to update the AMT bands listed in
Section 87.173(b) by removing the entry for the 2310-2320 MHz band and by adding an entry the
5091-5150 MHz band. For the 5091-5150 MHz band entry, we propose to specify that this band is
available under Subpart J (Flight Test Stations), to restrict the use of this band to aircraft stations and
flight test stations,147 and to list aeronautical telemetry under the Remarks heading for this band.
72.
In accordance with RR 5.444, we propose to amend Section 87.173(b) by revising the entry
for the “5000-5250 MHz” band to read “5030-5091 MHz.” This action would update the band listed in
Part 87 as being available for microwave landing systems to the internationally allocated band for those
operations.
73.
Finally, we propose to amend Section 87.173(b) by adding an entry for the
“24450-24650 MHz” band and – if we decide to remove the radionavigation service (RNS) allocation
from the 24750-25050 MHz band (see paragraph 103, below) in this proceeding – by removing the entry
for that frequency band. For the 24450-24650 MHz band entry, we propose to specify that this band is
available under Subpart F (Aircraft Stations) and Subpart Q (Stations in the Radiodetermination
Service),148 to restrict the use of this band to aircraft stations and radionavigation land stations,149 and to
list aeronautical radionavigation under the Remarks heading. These actions would make the frequency
table in Section 87.173(b) consistent with the frequencies available to stations in the radiodetermination
service in Section 87.475.150
74.
Section 87.187(p). As stated above, we propose to update the AMT bands listed in
Section 87.187(p). In particular, we would list the 2360-2395 MHz (primary allocation) and
2345-2360 MHz (secondary allocation) bands and list the three frequencies (2364.5 MHz, 2370.5 MHz,
and 2382.5 MHz) that may be assigned for telemetry and associated telecommand operations of
expendable and re-usable launch vehicles, whether or not such operations involve flight testing.
75.
Section 87.303(d). We propose to amend Section 87.303(d) to reflect our proposal to make
the 5091-5150 MHz band available for aeronautical mobile telemetry. Specifically, we would insert
introductory language listing the available bands; add new text to paragraph (d)(2) to specify use of the
5091-5150 MHz band and to cross reference footnote US111; and move and update the text that is
currently listed in paragraph (d)(2) to paragraph (d)(3). We would also make several minor revisions to


146 Section 5.2.1 of the NTIA Manual specifies a frequency tolerance of + 50 parts per million for mobile stations in
the 4,000 to 10,500 MHz range. We note that 50/1,000,000 = 0.00005 = 0.005 percent. See NTIA Manual at
Section 5.2.1 (Table of Frequency Tolerances). In particular, see the “Frequency Band 1215 to 10500 MHz” in
Table 5.2.1.
147 Specifically, under the heading “Class of station,” we would add “MA, FAT.” Station class symbol MA
indicates aircraft station (air carrier and private) and station class symbol FAT indicates flight test station.
47 C.F.R. §§ 87.171, 87.173(b).
148 The 24450-24650 MHz band is listed in Section 87.187(x). 47 C.F.R. § 87.187(x).
149 Specifically, under the heading “Class of station,” we would add “MA, RL.” Station class symbol RL indicates
radionavigation land station (unspecified). 47 C.F.R. §§ 87.171, 87.173(b).
150 See paragraphs 76 and 104, where we propose to list the 24450-24650 MHz band in Section 87.475 and solicit
comment on whether the radiolocation service (RNS) allocation should be removed from the 24750-25050 MHz
band, respectively.
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the text of the rule for purposes of clarity and accuracy. The proposed revisions are shown in
Appendix D.
76.
Section 87.475(b). If we decide to add paragraphs (b)(11) and (b)(14) of Section 87.475
back into the rules (as proposed in the 2010 proceeding151), we propose to modify those provisions (which
list the frequencies available to stations in radiodetermination service) to the extent described herein.
Specifically, we propose to amend Section 87.475(b)(11) by revising the frequency band that can be used
for microwave landing systems (MLS) from “5000-5250 MHz” to “5030-5091 MHz.” If we decide to
remove the RNS service allocation from the 24.75-25.05 GHz band (see paragraph 103, below), we
would further amend Section 87.475(b)(14) by revising a frequency band that can be used for land-based
radionavigation aids that operate with airborne radionavigation devices from “24,250-25,250 MHz” to
“24,450-24,650 MHz.”
77.
The proposed text for the aforementioned rule section changes is shown in Appendix D and
our proposed actions are summarized in Table 4, below. We seek comment on all of these proposals. In
particular, we seek comment on the advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated
with changing our rules. In addition, we solicit comment on whether the 52 flight test areas, which are
listed in proposed footnote US111, should instead be listed in Part 87 of the Commission’s rules.152

Table 4: Proposed Amendments to Nine Rule Sections in Part 87

Section and Heading
Paragraph
Proposed Action
87.5 – Definitions
-
Add a definition for flight telemetering mobile station
87.133 – Frequency Stability
(f)
Update the AMT bands and remove expired transition plan
87.137 – Types of emission
(a)
Update the AMT bands
87.139 – Emission limitations
(a), (e), (f)
Update the AMT bands
(d)
Remove 1525-1535 MHz from the exception band
87.173 – Frequencies
(b)
Update the AMT bands; add entry for the 24.45-24.65 GHz band;
revise the MLS band entry from 5000-5250 to 5030-5091 MHz
87.187 – Frequencies
(p)
Update the AMT bands
87.303 – Frequencies
(d)
Update the AMT bands and state that the 2345-2360 MHz band
is available on a secondary basis
87.305 – Frequency
(a)(1)
Update the AMT bands that the frequency advisory committee
coordination
must coordinate153
87.475 – Frequencies
(b)(11), (b)(14) Reinsert updated deleted text
3.

Radiolocation and Active Sensors in the 9-10 GHz Range

78.
In the pre-WRC-07 ITU Allocation Table, the 9000-9200 MHz band was allocated to the
aeronautical radionavigation service (ARNS) on a primary basis and to the radiolocation service (RLS) on
a secondary basis, the 9300-9500 MHz band was allocated to the radionavigation service (RNS) on a
primary basis and to the RLS on a secondary basis, and the 9800-10,000 MHz band was allocated to the


151 The Commission previously proposed to amend Section 87.475 by reinserting paragraphs (b)(9) through (b)(14).
See Amendment of the Commission’s Rules Governing Certain Aviation Ground Station Equipment, WT Docket
No. 10-61, Notice of Proposed Rule Making, 25 FCC Rcd 3355, 3357 at footnote 13 (2010).
152 For example, if the 52 flight test areas were listed in an expanded Section 87.303(d)(2), then proposed
U.S. footnote US111 could be revised to state that the flight test areas are listed in Section 87.303(d)(2) and in the
NTIA Manual, and that flight testing at additional locations may be authorized on a case-by-case basis.
153 The Aerospace & Flight Test Radio Coordinating Council (AFTRCC) is the frequency advisory committee
specified in Section 87.303(a)(1). 47 C.F.R. § 87.303(a)(1). See http://www.aftrcc.org/ for additional information.
32

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RLS on a primary basis.154 These allocations and four international footnotes (5.337, 5.427, 5.474, and
5.479) are currently implemented in the U.S. Table.
79.
9000-9200 MHz. Specifically, in the U.S. Table, the 9000-9200 MHz band is allocated to
the ARNS on a primary basis, and to the RLS on a secondary basis, for Federal and non-Federal use.
ARNS use of the 9000-9200 MHz band is restricted to ground-based radars and to associated airborne
transponders (RR 5.337), Federal RLS use is restricted to the military services (G2), and non-Federal
RLS use may be authorized on the condition that harmful interference is not caused to the ARNS or the
Federal RLS (US48).
80.
WRC-07 raised the secondary RLS allocation in the 9000-9200 MHz band to primary
status in all ITU Regions. WRC-07 also adopted RR 5.473A, which requires that RLS stations operating
in the 9000-9200 MHz band not cause harmful interference to, nor claim protection from, ARNS systems
identified in RR 5.337 (i.e., ground-based radars and associated airborne transponders) or shore-based
radar systems in the maritime radionavigation service (MRNS) operating in this band on a primary basis
in the countries listed in RR 5.471.155
81.
9300-9500 MHz. In the U.S. Table, the 9300-9500 MHz band is currently allocated to the
RNS on a primary basis, and to the RLS and meteorological aids service (MetAids) on a secondary basis,
for Federal and non-Federal use. The response from RLS radar transponders must not be capable of being
confused with the response from RNS radar beacons (racons) and must not cause interference to ship or
aeronautical radars in the RNS in the 9300-9500 MHz band (RR 5.427). Low-powered MRNS stations
are protected from harmful interference caused by the operation of land-based equipment in the
9300-9320 MHz band (US71). ARNS use of the 9300-9500 MHz band is restricted to airborne radars
and associated airborne beacons, except that ground-based radar beacons are permitted in the
9300-9320 MHz band on the condition that harmful interference is not caused to the MRNS (US66).
82.
Federal RLS use of the 9300-9500 MHz band is primarily for the military services (G56),
and non-Federal RLS use may be authorized on the condition that harmful interference is not caused to
the Federal RLS (US51). Search and rescue transponders (SART) may be used in the 9200-9500 MHz
band (RR 5.474). MetAids use is restricted to ground-based radars (US67).156
83.
WRC-07 allocated the 9300-9500 MHz band to the Earth exploration-satellite service
(EESS) (active) and space research service (SRS) (active) (together, active sensors) on a primary basis in
all ITU Regions and raised the existing secondary RLS allocation in that band to primary status.157
WRC-07 revised RR 5.475 by moving the last sentence (concerning priority for certain ground-based
radars) to new RR 5.475B, which states that RLS stations operating in the 9300-9500 MHz band must not
cause harmful interference to, nor claim protection from, RNS radars and that ground-based radars used
for meteorological purposes have priority over other RLS uses. WRC-07 also revised RR 5.476A, which


154 See footnote 59, supra, for the definition of the ARNS and footnote 47, supra, for the definition of the RLS. In
the ITU Allocation Table, these allocations applied in all ITU Regions. Other allocations, not pertinent to this
discussion, have been omitted.
155 The MRNS is a radionavigation service intended for the benefit and for the safe operation of ships.
47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c). The countries listed in RR 5.471 are in Region 1 (Europe: Belgium, France, Germany, Greece,
and the Netherlands; Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, and Sudan; and Asia: Bahrain, Qatar, and the United Arab
Emirates) and in Region 3 (China, Indonesia, and Iran).
156 US67 also states that RLS installations will be coordinated with the MetAids service and, insofar as practicable,
will be adjusted to meet the requirements of the MetAids service.
157 An active sensor is a measuring instrument in the EESS or in the SRS by means of which information is obtained
by transmission and reception of radio waves. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
33

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previously applied only to the 9500-9800 MHz band, by applying this international footnote to the
expanded active sensor band (9300-9800 MHz). RR 5.476A now states that, in the 9300-9800 MHz
band, stations in the EESS (active) and SRS (active) must not cause harmful interference to, nor claim
protection from, stations of the RNS and RLS. Finally, RR 5.475A states that the use of the
9300-9500 MHz band by the EESS (active) and the SRS (active) is limited to systems requiring necessary
bandwidth greater than 300 megahertz that cannot be fully accommodated within the 9500-9800 MHz
band.
84.
9800-10,000 MHz. In the U.S. Table, the 9800-10,000 MHz band is currently allocated to
the RLS on a primary basis for Federal use and on a secondary basis for non-Federal use. The
9975-10,025 MHz band is also allocated to the meteorological-satellite service on a secondary basis for
use by weather radars (RR 5.479). WRC-07 allocated the 9800-9900 MHz band to the EESS (active) and
SRS (active) on a secondary basis.158
85.
NTIA recommends that the secondary Federal RLS allocation in the 9000-9200 MHz and
9300-9500 MHz bands be raised to primary status, the 9300-9500 MHz band be allocated to the
EESS (active) and SRS (active) on a primary basis for Federal use, and the 9800-9900 MHz band be
allocated to the EESS (active) and SRS (active) on a secondary basis for Federal use. Because its
recommended upgrade in the allocation status of the Federal RLS in the 9000-9200 MHz and
9300-9500 MHz bands makes US48 and US51 unnecessary, NTIA also recommends that we remove
US48 and US51 from the U.S. Table.159 In addition, NTIA recommends that we add: 1) RR 5.473A to
the Federal Table in the 9000-9200 MHz band; 2) RR 5.475A and RR 5.475B to the Federal Table in the
9300-9500 MHz band;160 and 3) a new U.S. footnote, which we tentatively number as US476A (based on
RR 5.476A), to the Federal and non-Federal Tables in the 9300-9500 MHz band.161 We note that
recommended footnote US476A differs from RR 5.476A in that it applies only to the existing active
sensor band (9300-9500 MHz, instead of the expanded active sensor band at 9300-9800 MHz) and that it
does not provide secondary non-Federal RLS stations with interference protection from Federal active
sensors.
86.
We propose to amend the U.S. Table as requested by NTIA. When implemented, Federal
agencies would have the contiguous emission bandwidths that are needed to respond to emerging RLS
requirements for increased image resolution and increased range accuracy and for increased resolution of
global environmental and land use monitoring and terrain mapping of planetary surfaces.162 In addition,
we propose to allocate the 9300-9500 MHz and 9800-9900 MHz bands to the EESS (active) and
SRS (active) on a secondary basis for non-Federal use. We note that if these active sensor allocations are
added to the non-Federal Table, then the 9500-9800 MHz and 9800-9900 MHz bands would contain the
same allocations. Therefore, we also propose to merge these bands to form the 9500-9900 MHz band in
the non-Federal Table. We seek comment on these proposals. In particular, we seek comment on the
advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated with changing our rules. In


158 To add the new secondary EESS (active) and SRS (active) allocations to the lower 100 megahertz segment,
WRC-07 divided the 9800-10,000 MHz band into the 9800-9900 MHz and 9900-10,000 MHz bands. See Table 6,
infra.
159 NTIA recommended the deletion of US48 and US51 during the coordination process.
160 The WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order added these footnotes, which the ITU adopted at WRC-07, to the list of
International Footnotes in Section 2.106. See WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order, 25 FCC Rcd at 9721 para. 17.
161 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 3 (for footnote USXXX [5.476A] [1.3b], which we tentatively number
as US476A) and at 44 (for modifications to the U.S. Table in the 9000-9200, 9300-9500, and 9800-10,000 MHz
bands).
162 See U.S. Proposals for WRC-07, Agenda item 1.3, at 5-6, 8. For additional information, see
Report ITU-R M.2050, Report ITU-R M.2076, and Report ITU-R M.2081.
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addition, we solicit comment on whether there is a non-Federal requirement for primary EESS (active)
and SRS (active) allocations in the 9300-9500 MHz band.
87.
We also note that RR 5.475, which is currently listed at the bottom of the cell for the
9300-9500 MHz band in the International Table, applies only to the ARNS, which is a subset of the RNS.
To correct this display error in the International Table, we propose to list RR 5.475 to the right of the
RNS allocation in the Allocation Table, so that it is clear that RR 5.475 applies only to the ARNS.
Finally, we propose to renumber US66 as US475 (based on RR 5.475) to simplify the U.S. Table.
Table 6, below, reflects the 9000-9200 MHz, 9300-9500 MHz, and 9800-10000 MHz bands as they
currently exist in the U.S. Table and our proposed amendments to these bands.

Table 6: Proposals for the 9000-9200 MHz, 9300-9500 MHz, and 9500-10000 MHz Bands

Existing U.S. Table
Proposed U.S. Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
9000-9200
9000-9200
9000-9200
9000-9200
AERONAUTICAL
AERONAUTICAL
AERONAUTICAL
AERONAUTICAL
RADIONAVIGATION 5.337
RADIONAVIGATION 5.337
RADIONAVIGATION 5.337
RADIONAVIGATION 5.337
Radiolocation G2
Radiolocation
RADIOLOCATION G2
Radiolocation
US48 G19
US48
5.473A G19
9300-9500
9300-9500
9300-9500
9300-9500
RADIONAVIGATION US66
RADIONAVIGATION US66
EARTH EXPLORATION-
RADIONAVIGATION US475
Radiolocation US51 G56
Radiolocation US51
SATELLITE (active)
Meteorological aids
Meteorological aids
Meteorological aids
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
RADIOLOCATION G56
Space research (active)
RADIONAVIGATION US475
Radiolocation
Meteorological aids
5.427 5.474 5.475A 5.475B
5.427 5.474 US67 US71
5.427 5.474 US67 US71
5.427 5.474 US67 US71
US67 US71 US476A
US476A
9500-9800
9500-9800
9500-9800
9500-9900
EARTH EXPLORATION-
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
EARTH EXPLORATION-
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
SATELLITE (active)
Space research (active)
SATELLITE (active)
Space research (active)
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
Radiolocation
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
Radiolocation
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
9800-10000
9800-10000
9800-9900
RADIOLOCATION
Radiolocation
RADIOLOCATION
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
Space research (active)
9900-10000
9900-10000
RADIOLOCATION
Radiolocation
5.479
5.479
5.479
5.479
4.

Satellite and Fixed Use of 17.7-20.2 GHz

88.
The frequency bands that comprise the 17.8-20.2 GHz range are Federal/non-Federal
shared bands, which are allocated to the fixed-satellite service (FSS) (space-to-Earth) on a primary basis
for Federal and non-Federal use.163 G117 limits Federal use of this FSS downlink allocation to military
systems and US334 places additional restrictions on Federal FSS use of the 17.8-20.2 GHz range (e.g.,


163 The 18.6-18.8 GHz band is also allocated to the Earth exploration-satellite service (passive) and space research
service (passive) on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use. We are not discussing these passive services
further because we are not making any proposals that affect these allocations. The 19.7-20.1 GHz and
20.1-20.2 GHz bands are also allocated to the mobile-satellite service (space-to-Earth) on a primary basis for
non-Federal use. In paragraph 171, below, we merge these bands. Because the 19.7-20.2 GHz band is not allocated
to any terrestrial service, we are proposing no substantive changes for this band and it is not discussed further in this
section.
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power flux-density limits).164 The 18.1-18.3 GHz band is also allocated to the meteorological-satellite
service (MetSat) (space-to-Earth) on a primary basis (US519). In the next section, we propose to expand
this MetSat allocation.
89.
The 17.7-18.3 GHz and 19.3-19.7 GHz bands are allocated to the fixed service (FS) on a
primary basis for non-Federal use. NG144 grandfathers wide band licensees in the 17.7-18.3 GHz and
19.3-19.7 GHz bands and provides for continued co-primary FS use of the 18.3-19.3 GHz band.165
US401 requires the Commission to coordinate with NTIA FS applications supporting Multichannel Video
Programming Distributors (MVPD) 166 in the Denver, Colorado and Washington, D.C. areas before the
commencement of operations in the 17.7-17.8 GHz band.167
90.
While the general practice is to coordinate all operations in a Federal/non-Federal shared
band, the Commission currently requires that, in the 17.7-19.7 GHz band, only those non-Federal
terrestrial applications in the Denver, Colorado and Washington, D.C. areas be coordinated with NTIA.
These coordination areas are defined in Section 1.924(e) for Part 101 applicants, in Section 74.32 for
Television Broadcast Auxiliary Station applicants,168 and in Section 78.19(f) for Cable Television Relay
Service (CARS) applicants.169
91.
NTIA requests that we revise the existing coordination procedures for the 17.7-19.7 GHz
band by adding new coordination areas to the Commission’s rules that would protect critical Federal
receiving earth stations near San Miguel, California and on Guam from harmful interference.170


164 At NTIA’s request, we are updating the text of G117 in the Order portion of this document. See paragraph 169,
below.
165 NG144 reads as follows: “Stations authorized as of September 9, 1983 to use frequencies in the bands 17.7-18.3
GHz and 19.3-19.7 GHz may, upon proper application, continue operations. Fixed stations authorized in the band
18.3-19.3 GHz that remain co-primary under the provisions of 47 CFR 21.901(e), 74.502(c), 74.602(g), 78.18(a)(4),
and 101.147(r) may continue operations consistent with the provisions of those sections.” Historically, the
17.7-19.7 GHz range was allocated for non-Federal terrestrial (fixed and mobile) use; however in 2003, the
Commission finalized its reallocation of the 18.3-19.3 GHz band from terrestrial services to the FSS (space-to-
Earth). Redesignation of the 17.7-19.7 GHz Frequency Band, Blanket Licensing of Satellite Earth Stations in the
17.7-20.2 GHz and 27.5-30.0 GHz Frequency Bands, and the Allocation of Additional Spectrum in the 17.3-17.8
GHz and 24.75-25.25 GHz Frequency Bands for Broadcast Satellite-Service Use, IB Docket No. 98-172, Report and
Order
, 15 FCC Rcd 13430 (2000), recon. granted in part, First Order on Reconsideration, 16 FCC Rcd 19808
(2001), further recon. granted in part, Second Order on Reconsideration, 17 FCC Rcd 24248 (2002), further recon.
denied, Third Order on Reconsideration
, 19 FCC Rcd 10777 (2003).
166 The term “multichannel video programming distributor” means a person such as, but not limited to, a cable
operator, a multichannel multipoint distribution service, a direct broadcast satellite service, or a television
receive-only satellite program distributor, who makes available for purchase, by subscribers or customers, multiple
channels of video programming. 47 U.S.C 522(13).
167 In 2006, the Commission adopted a revised band plan for the terrestrial Fixed Microwave Services that operated
in the band 17.7-19.7 GHz by providing for paired and unpaired channels in the bands 17.7-18.14 GHz and
19.3-19.7 GHz and for one-way MVPD use of the band 17.7-18.3 GHz. At that time, the Commission also adopted
footnote US401 in order to protect Federal earth station reception of the band 17.8-20.2 GHz from fixed stations
supporting MVPD operations in the 17.7-17.8 GHz band. Rechannelization of the 17.7-19.7 GHz Frequency Band
for Fixed Microwave Services under Part 101 of the Commission’s Rules, WT Docket No. 04-143, Report and Order,
21 FCC Rcd 10900 (2006) (18 GHz FS R&O).
168 47 C.F.R. § 74.502(c).
169 47 C.F.R. §§ 1.924(e), §74.32, §78.19(f).
170 See Letter from Karl B. Nebbia, Associate Administrator, Office of Spectrum Management, NTIA, to
Julius P. Knapp, Chief, OET, ET Docket No. 12-338, dated July 30, 2012 at 1-2.
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Specifically, NTIA asks that we require that applications for terrestrial operations in the 17.7-19.7 GHz
band within the following areas be coordinated through the normal Frequency Assignment Subcommittee
(FAS) process prior to the issuance of a Commission license.171 The San Miguel, California area would
consist of the circular area that is within 200 km of 35° 44' North latitude (N), 120° 45' West longitude
(W) and a rectangular area between latitudes 34° 39' N and 34° 00' N and between longitudes 118° 52' W
and 119° 24' W. The Guam area would consist of the circular area that is within 100 km of 13° 35' N and
144° 51' East Longitude. NTIA also requests that we amend US401 to list the San Miguel and Guam
areas.
92.
We propose to amend US401 and Sections 1.924(e), 74.32, and 78.19(f) of the
Commission’s rules by adding the requested coordination areas. We make this proposal at the request of
NTIA for the purpose of advancing, supporting, and accommodating the national defense.172 We note
that the Guam area would fully encompass the islands of Guam and Rota.173 It appears that the Guam
area, if adopted, would have little or no adverse impact on the economic development on Guam because
there were only 13 licenses that authorized the use of frequencies in the 17.7-19.7 GHz band on Guam.174
The relatively small size of Guam and of its population leads us to tentatively conclude that to the extent
that any fixed operations can not be accommodated in the 17.7-18.3 GHz and 19.3-19.7 GHz bands, they
can be accommodated in other FS bands. While we acknowledge that the San Miguel area is more
densely populated and more heavily licensed than is the Guam area, we also tentatively conclude that the
public interest justifies the addition of the requested coordination areas. NTIA has stated that, during the
more than 15 years in which coordination has been required in the Denver and Washington D.C. areas,
more than 99 percent of the license applications were determined not to exceed the criteria for
interference to the two earth stations. NTIA also states that in virtually all of the limited number of cases
where interference was predicted, the Federal Government worked directly with the applicant to develop
a plan to mitigate interference and satisfied the applicant’s communications requirements with little or no
impact on the applicant. We seek comment on these tentative conclusions and statements.
93.
We also propose to amend the text in Sections 1.924(e), 74.32, and 78.19(f) to bring better
consistency between these rules and to update these rules. For example, because no new 18 GHz low
power systems are being authorized, the proposed text for Section 1.924(e) would require that only
“modification” applications, e.g., changes in coordinates, be coordinated.175
94.
We note that CARS stations are not authorized to operate within 50 km of Denver, except
within 5 km of Morrison, Colorado.176 It does not appear that any CARS licensee is authorized to operate


171 The FAS is a subcommittee of the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee (IRAC) within NTIA that
develops and executes procedures for the assignment and coordination of Federal radio frequencies.
47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
172 47 U.S.C. § 151.
173 Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands are United States Pacific insular areas located in ITU Region 3. Rota is
the southernmost island within the Northern Mariana Islands. 47 C.F.R. § 2.105(a), footnote 3. Guam is about
30 miles long and is from 4 to 12 miles wide. Rota, which is 47 miles north of Guam, is approximately 10.5 miles
long and 3 miles wide.
174 As of February 20, 2012, no stations were licensed to operate in the 17.7-19.7 GHz band on Rota Island.
175 For the special provision that pertain to low power systems in the 17.7-19.7 GHz band, see 47 C.F.R.
101.147(r)(14). In particular, see 47 C.F.R. 101.147(r)(14)(iv) (New 18 GHz low power systems are not being
licensed).
176 Section 78.19(f)(1) states that, with the exception of applicants for a station authorization to operate within a
5 km radius of 39° 40' 23" N Lat. and 105° 13' 03" W Long (Morrison, CO), applicants will not be authorized to
operate within a 50 km radius of 39° 43' 00" N Lat. and 104° 46' 00" W Long. (Denver, CO) and within a 50 km
radius of 38° 48' 00" N Lat. and 76° 52' 00" W Long. (Washington, DC). 47 C.F.R. § 78.19(f)(1).
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in the Morrison location, and so we propose to remove this unused circular area from Section 78.19(f).
We believe that such action will better protect Federal earth stations in the Denver area and we seek
comment on this proposal. We also propose to move the revised text in paragraph (e) of Section 1.924 to
paragraph (f), thereby placing these rules in frequency order.177 The proposed text for Sections 1.924(f),
74.32, and 78.19(f) is shown in Appendix D. We solicit comment on this proposal. We are especially
interested in the expected impact that the proposed coordination area would have on non-Federal fixed
service operations in California.
95.
There is a longstanding agreement between the Commission and NTIA that only a limited
number of sites for receiving earth stations will be protected from harmful interference in the
17.8-20.2 GHz band. We tentatively find that no additional primary Federal earth station sites beyond the
two being considered herein should be authorized in the 17.8-18.3 GHz and 19.3-19.7 GHz sub-bands.178
Accordingly, we propose to amend US334 to add the following paragraph:
In the sub-bands 17.8-18.3 GHz and 19.3-19.7 GHz, Federal earth stations shall be authorized
on a primary basis only in the following areas: Denver, Colorado; Washington, DC; San
Miguel, California; and Guam. Prior to the commencement of non-Federal terrestrial operations
in these areas, the FCC shall coordinate all applications for new stations and modifications to
existing stations with NTIA as specified in 47 CFR 1.924(f), 74.32, and 78.19(f).
See Appendix D for the proposed text of US334 and US401.
96.
We believe that NG144 should be amended to remove unneeded text. Specifically, we
believe that the fixed service allocation in the 17.7-18.3 GHz and 19.3-19.7 GHz bands obviates the need
for the first sentence in NG144 (“Stations authorized as of September 9, 1983 to use frequencies in the
bands 17.7-18.3 GHz and 19.3-19.7 GHz may, upon proper application, continue operations.”) and we
propose to delete this sentence.179 We also propose to remove the reference to Part 21 in the second
sentence, given that the Commission has previously removed Part 21 from its rules. Lastly, because the
Commission requires that applications for certain specified modifications to grandfathered non-Federal
fixed stations be coordinated with NTIA, we propose to reclassify NG144 as a U.S. footnote, which we
would number in frequency order as US139. See Appendix D for the text of proposed footnote US139.
We request comment on all the proposals in this section. In particular, we seek comment on the
advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated with changing our rules. We also
seek comment on whether the coordination requirements for MVPD operations in Section 74.32, and


177 See paragraph 43, supra, where we propose to amend Section 1.924(f), which pertains to the 420-450 MHz band,
and to move the revised text to Section 1.924(e).
178 The Commission does not license new fixed stations in the 18.3-19.3 GHz band.
179 In 1983, the Commission adopted NG144 in order to grandfather licensed stations operating under the frequency
plan then codified in Section 21.701(j) (“The 17.7-19.7 GHz band was channelized into eight RF channels 220 MHz
wide to be used for common carriers on a cross-polarized basis to derive two communications channels per
frequency assignment and a 240 MHz unchannelized segment for channels of 100 MHz or less.”). See Use of Radio
in Digital Termination Systems and in Point-to-Point Microwave Radio Systems for Provision of Digital Electronic
Message Services, Second Report and Order, Gen. Docket No. 79-188, 48 FR 50322, 50323 n.3 (shown above),
50328 ¶ 39, 50329 Appendix B (for text of NG144) (Nov. 1, 1983). We note that this grandfathering provision is
also codified in 47 C.F.R. § 101.147(a) and (r). We further note that there appears to be only twelve active call signs
that were issued prior to September 9, 1983: 10 call signs authorize operations in the 17.7-18.3 GHz band (6 call
signs in the TV Intercity Relay (TI) Radio Service, 3 in the TV Studio Transmitter Links (TS) Radio Service, and
1 in the TV Translator Relay (TT) Radio Service), and that two call signs authorize operations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz
band (1 TS, 1 TT). Because all of the grandfathered stations appear to be fixed stations, and because the
Commission generally grandfathers radio services (not frequency plans) in the Section 2.106, we believe that it is
unnecessary and confusing to continue to list the first sentence in NG144.
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references in Section 1.924 to MVPD operations pursuant to Parts 74 and 78, are still relevant and, if not,
whether they should be removed from the Commission’s rules.180
5.

Meteorological Satellite Use of 18-18.1 GHz

97.
In the U.S. Table, the 17.8-18.3 GHz band is allocated to the non-Federal FS and to the
Federal FSS (space-to-Earth) on a co-primary basis.181 Prior to WRC-07, the 18.1-18.3 GHz segment was
also allocated to the meteorological-satellite service (MetSat) (space-to-Earth) on a primary basis
pursuant to RR 5.519,182 which also stated that that use of this MetSat allocation is limited to GSO
satellites and that the power flux-density (pfd) produced by such MetSats must be in accordance with the
provisions of Article 21, Table 21-4 of the ITU Radio Regulations.183
98.
WRC-07 addressed proposals to extend the current MetSat allocation to support increased
data rate requirements originating from high-resolution sensors by implementing a 100 megahertz
extension on a Regional basis.184 Specifically, WRC-07 revised RR 5.519 by expanding the existing GSO
MetSat allocation (18.1-18.3 GHz in all ITU Regions) to 18-18.3 GHz in ITU Region 2 (and to
18.1-18.4 GHz in ITU Regions 1 and 3) and by removing the reference to the pfd limits in Table 21-4.185
In the WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order, we replaced RR 5.519 with placeholder footnote US519, thereby
maintaining the status quo.186
99.
We note that the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) program is a
key element in National Weather Service (NWS) operations.187 GOES imagery and sounding data
support weather forecasting, severe storm tracking, and meteorological research. The new MetSat series


180 For example, Section 74.602(g) states that the use of the 17.7-19.7 GHz band is limited to “television STL,
television relay stations and television translator relay stations.” Thus, it appears that MVPD operations cannot be
authorized pursuant to Part 74. 47 C.F.R. § 74.602(g).
181 US334 restricts primary geostationary orbit (GSO) FSS networks to space stations located outside the domestic
arc (i.e., outside the arc from 70° to 120° West longitude), provides pfd limits at the surface of the Earth produced
by emissions from a Federal GSO and NGSO space station, and requires coordination between Federal FSS systems
and non-Federal space and terrestrial systems operating in the 17.8-18.3 GHz band. However, as part of the
agreement by which NTIA obtained this Federal FSS allocation, the Commission only coordinates FS use in the
17.8-18.3 GHz band near the earth station sites in the Washington, D.C., and Denver, Colorado, areas. 47 C.F.R.
§§ 1.924(e), 74.32, 78.19(f), and 101.147(r)(14). In addition, G117 restricts Federal use of this FSS allocation to
military systems.
182 The MetSat is an Earth exploration-satellite service for meteorological purposes. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
183 Radio Regulation No. 21.16 states that, in a 1 megahertz reference bandwidth, the pfd at the Earth’s surface
produced by emissions from a MetSat space station, for all conditions and for all methods of modulation, shall not
exceed the limit for the 17.7-19.3 GHz band, i.e., -115 dB(W/m2) for angles of arrival (δ) above the horizontal plane
of 0°-5°, -115 + 0.5(δ-5) dB(W/m2) for δ above the horizontal plane of 5°-25°, and -105 dB(W/m2) for δ above the
horizontal plane of 25°-90°. The limit relates to the pfd which would be obtained under assumed free-space
propagation conditions. See ITU Radio Regulations, Article 21, Radio Regulation No. 21.16 and the 17.7-19.3 GHz
band entry containing the MetSat service from Table 21-4 (Rev.WRC-07), and in particular, note 13.
184 See CPM-07 Report, Agenda item 1.2, Issue A, Chapter 2 at 6-10. See also U.S. Proposals for WRC-07 at 3-5.
185 The provisions of Article 21, Table 21-4 of the ITU Radio Regulations apply to the services and frequency bands
listed in that table irrespective of whether there is a cross reference to these pfd limits. Therefore, WRC-07
simplified RR 5.519 by removing this cross reference.
186 See WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order, 25 FCC Rcd at 9723-24 paras. 21, 24.
187 See Sample Characteristics and Sharing Criteria for Geostationary Meteorological Satellites in the Band
18-18.4 GHz, CBS/SG-RFC 2004/Doc. 2.3(2) (available at http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/www/TEM/SG-
RFC04/23-2-char-metsat-18GHz.doc).
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will use the 18 GHz band for the sole purpose of raw sensor data transmission to specific earth stations.
The three earth stations that support an existing raw data downlink in the 1670-1710 MHz band
(Fairbanks, Alaska; Wallops Island, Virginia; and Greenbelt, Maryland) will continue to support this
function once the frequency band is changed to the 18 GHz allocation.
100. NTIA recommends that we adopt a simplified version of RR 5.519 that contains only the
MetSat allocation for Region 2.188 We observe, however, that the ITU studies for the expanded MetSat
allocation state that the pfd limits as given in RR Table 21-4 will protect FS operations “with significant
margin.”189 Therefore, in accordance with the U.S. Proposals for WRC-07, we also propose to retain the
current pfd requirement to protect the non-Federal FS that operates in the 17.7-18.3 GHz band on a
primary basis.190 Accordingly, we propose to amend US519 by simply revising the “18.1-18.3 GHz”
band reference to read “18-18.3 GHz.” We request comment on this proposal. In particular, we seek
comment on the advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated with changing our
rules.
6.

Deletion of Radionavigation Service Allocation from 24.75-25.05 GHz

101. In the ITU Allocation Table, the 24.75-25.25 GHz band is allocated to the FSS (Earth-to-
space) on an exclusive basis in Region 2. RR 5.535 states that feeder links to stations of the broadcasting-
satellite service (BSS) have priority over other FSS uses and that these other uses shall protect, and shall
not claim protection from, existing and future BSS feeder-link networks.
102. In the U.S. Table, the 24.75-25.05 GHz and 25.05-25.25 GHz bands are allocated to the
FSS (Earth-to-space) on a primary basis for non-Federal use. NG167 states that the use of these FSS
allocations is restricted to BSS feeder links.191 We have also allocated the 24.75-25.05 GHz band to the
radionavigation service (RNS) on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use and the
25.05-25.25 GHz band to the FS on a primary basis for non-Federal use.192
103.
A petition from the Xanadoo Company and Spectrum Five LLC, pending before the
Commission, requests that we delete the unused RNS allocation from the 24.75-25.05 GHz band, amend
NG167 by permitting other digital uplinks that are associated with the BSS to use the 24.75-25.05 GHz
band, and permit blanket licensing of two-way earth stations in the 17/24 GHz BSS spectrum.193


188 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 3, footnote USXX1 [1.2A].
189 See CPM-07 Report, Chapter 2, at 10, Section 2/1.2/1.3.4.
190 See U.S. Proposals for WRC-07, Agenda item 1.2, pp. 3, 5.
191 There are existing satellite authorizations and pending applications in this service. See The Establishment of
Policies and Service Rules for the Broadcasting-Satellite Service at the 17.3-17.7 GHz Frequency Band and at the
17.7-17.8 GHz Frequency Band Internationally, and at the 24.75-25.25 GHz Frequency Band for Fixed Satellite
Services Providing Feeder Links to the Broadcasting-Satellite Service and for the Satellite Services Operating
Bi-directionally in the 17.3-17.8 GHz Frequency Band, Second Report and Order, FCC 11-93, IB Docket
No. 06-123, 26 FCC Rcd 8927 (2011), footnote 23.
192 On February 22, 2012, there were 109 call signs in the ULS that authorized operations in the 25.05-25.25 GHz
band under Part 101 Subpart G of the Commission’s rules.
193 The Xanadoo Petition states at note 1 that the term “17/24 GHz BSS” refers to the FSS downlink band at
17.3-17.8 GHz and the FSS uplink band at 24.75-25.25 GHz. See Petition for Rulemaking to Establish Rules
Permitting Blanket Licensing of Two-Way Earth Stations With End-User Uplinks in the 24.25-25.05 GHz band,
IB Docket No. 06-123, filed by the Xanadoo Company and Spectrum Five LLC on April 16, 2010, available at
http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/ecfs/document/view?id=7020409944. At this juncture, we are not seeking comment on
whether we should amend NG167 by permitting other digital uplinks that are associated with the BSS to use the
(continued…)
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104.
Because the 24.75-25.05 GHz band is not allocated to the RNS in the ITU Allocation
Table and because this RNS allocation is unused in the United States, we solicit comment on whether
there is any planned use of this RNS allocation that would lead us to conclude that it should not be
removed from the U.S. Table.194 If we decide to remove the RNS allocation from the 24.75-25.05 GHz
band, then we would amend NG167 by employing the RR 5.535 text in the 24.75-25.05 GHz band (which
would be allocated for exclusive FSS uplink use if we delete the RNS allocation),195 remove the Part 87
cross reference from the Allocation Table, and remove the 24.75-25.05 GHz band from Sections
87.173(b) and 87.187(x). Accordingly, we seek comment on what actions we should take in this
regard.196 In particular, we seek comment on the advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and
benefits associated with changing our rules.

E.

Radio Astronomy Observatories in the 81-95 GHz Range

105.
The 81-86 GHz, 92-94 GHz, and 94.1-95 GHz bands are allocated to the radio astronomy
service (RAS) on a co-primary basis with active services. US388 lists the coordination areas around 18
observatories. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has informed NTIA that the Five Colleges Radio
Observatory should be removed from US388 and that the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Observatory,
which is located at Mount Graham, Arizona, should be added to US388.197 NTIA requests that we update
US388 to reflect these changes in RAS usage and that we require that non-Federal applications for
stations that would operate in these bands be coordinated if the proposed operation is within 150 km of
the new observatory (32° 42' 06'' N, 109° 53' 28'' W).198
106.
At the request of NTIA, we propose to update US388 to reflect the actual locations at
which radio astronomy stations observe in the 81-86 GHz, 92-94 GHz, and 94.1-95 GHz (80/90 GHz)
bands, to simplify the text of this footnote (e.g., by listing the observatories in alphabetical order by state),
and to renumber this footnote in frequency order as US161. We note that the coordination area of the
new observatory at Mount Graham includes the Tucson urbanized area.199 However, because there
are currently no non-Federal stations registered to operate in the 81-95 GHz band within 150 km of the
new observatory’s coordinates, we anticipate that the requested coordination requirement will not be
overly burdensome to applicants.200 Therefore, we propose to require that all non-Federal applications
(Continued from previous page)


24.75-25.05 GHz band or on whether we should permit blanket licensing of two-way earth stations in the 17/24 GHz
BSS spectrum because these issues can best be addressed in a focused rulemaking proceeding.
194 We note that NTIA has previously stated that it “could not identify any operational radar usage” in the
24.75-25.25 GHz band and that this band is not listed in the “20-Year Federal Spectrum Requirement Forecast for
Radar Bands.” See “Federal Radar Spectrum Requirements,” U.S. Department of Commerce, NTIA Special
Publication 00-40, May 2000, at pp. vi and 21.
195 Specifically, if the proposed revision of NG167 is adopted, then BSS feeder links operating on frequencies in the
24.75-25.05 GHz band would have priority over other FSS uplink uses. Any other FSS uses (i.e., non-BSS feeder
link uses) would be required to protect, and could not claim protection from, existing and future BSS feeder-link
operations. As an administrative matter, we would also renumber NG167 as NG535 (based on RR 5.535).
196 If we decide to delete the RLS allocation from the 24.75-25.05 GHz band, then licensing and technical
rules, including orbital spacing requirements, would be the subject of a further proceeding.
197 Specifically, NSF states that the Five Colleges Radio Observatory is no longer in operation and that it should be
removed from US203 and US388. We are proposing to update US203 in paragraph 59, supra.
198 See Letter from Karl B. Nebbia, Associate Administrator, Office of Spectrum Management, NTIA to
Julius P. Knapp, Chief, OET, ET Docket No. 12-338, received September 2, 2011.
199 The Phoenix urbanized area, as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau for the year 2000, is not within 150 km of the
Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Observatory.
200 As of February 22, 2012, no registered non-Federal station operates in the 81-95 GHz band within 150 km of the
new RAS station at Mount Graham.
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within the requested coordination area around Mount Graham be coordinated with NTIA in order to
protect RAS reception in the 80/90 GHz bands and request comment on our analysis and proposal. In
particular, we seek comment on the advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated
with changing our rules.

F.

Protection of Passive Sensors from Active Service Operations

107.
The 1400-1427 MHz, 10.68-10.7 GHz, 23.6-24 GHz, 31.3-31.5 GHz, 36-37 GHz,
50.2-50.4 GHz, and 52.6-54.25 GHz bands are allocated to the Earth exploration-satellite service (EESS)
(passive) and other passive services on a primary basis in all ITU Regions (hereafter, the “EESS (passive)
bands”).201 The EESS (passive) bands are used to collect environmental data on water vapor, ocean
salinity, soil moisture, sea ice, and sea emissivity measurements. They are also essential for the
calibration of other passive band data. The EESS (passive) bands provide essential data for weather
forecasting and weather-related natural disaster forecasting. Passive sensors202 receive natural emissions
(i.e., radiations from the Earth, atmosphere, or space) at much lower levels than are generally used in
other radiocommunication services, and thus, these sensors are more susceptible to interference from the
unwanted emissions of active services.
1.

Protection of the EESS (passive) from Unwanted Emissions

108.
WRC-07 considered that primary allocations have previously been made to the fixed
service (FS), mobile service (MS), fixed-satellite service (FSS) (Earth-to-space), and non-geostationary
satellite orbit systems in the inter-satellite service (NGSO ISS) (collectively, the “active services”) in
bands near or adjacent to five EESS (passive) bands (1400-1427 MHz, 23.6-24 GHz, 31.3-31.5 GHz,
50.2-50.4 GHz, and 52.6-54.25 GHz). To better protect the important data collected in the passive bands,
WRC-07 adopted Resolution 750, which specifies mandatory limits of unwanted emission power
(hereinafter, “mandatory unwanted emission limit(s)”) in a specified bandwidth within four of the passive
bands from certain active service stations that operate in the 22.55-23.55 GHz, 31-31.3 GHz, 49.7-50.2
GHz, 50.4-50.9 GHz, and 51.4-52.6 GHz bands. In Resolution 750, WRC-07 also urges administrations
to take all reasonable steps to ensure that certain active service stations that operate in the
1350-1400 MHz, 1427-1452 MHz, and 30-31 GHz bands comply with the recommended maximum level
of unwanted emission power (hereinafter, “non-mandatory unwanted emission level”) in a specified
bandwidth within two of the passive bands.203 In addition, WRC-07 added RR 5.338A to the
ITU Allocation Table, which states that Resolution 750 applies to these seven active service bands.204


201 We believe that passive sensors aboard U.S. satellites receive in all of the frequency bands discussed in this
section. In particular, we note that, during the coordination process, NASA stated that it had launched the Aquarius
instrument in August 2011 to make global maps of ocean salinity using the 1400-1427 MHz band; that several
instruments (e.g., the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), the
Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI), WindSat, Advanced Microwave
Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A), Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), Jason Microwave Radiometer)
use the 23.6-24 GHz band; that the AMSU-A instrument performs observations in the 31.3-31.5 GHz band; and that
the AMSU-A, the Special Sensor Microwave/Temperature (SSM/T), and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager
Sounder (SSMIS) make measurements in the 50.2-50.4 GHz and 52.6-54.25 GHz bands. RR 5.340 states that all
emissions are prohibited in the EESS (passive) bands and US246 states that no station shall be authorized to transmit
in the EESS (passive) bands.
202 A passive sensor is a measuring instrument in the EESS or in the space research service by means of which
information is obtained by reception of radio waves of natural origin. 47 C.F.R. § 2.1(c).
203 See ITU Radio Regulations, Volume 3, Resolution 750 (WRC-07), titled “Compatibility between the Earth
exploration-satellite service (passive) and relevant active services.” ITU Resolution 750 urges administrations to
take all reasonable steps to ensure that unwanted emissions from: a) stations in the RLS transmitting in the
1350-1390 MHz band not exceed -29 dBW/27 MHz; and b) FSS earth stations transmitting in the 30-31 GHz band
not exceed: 1) -20 dBW/200 MHz for earth stations having an antenna gain less than 56 dBi; or 2) -9 dBW/200 MHz
(continued…)
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109.
To implement the WRC-07 actions, NTIA initially recommended that we adopt six
U.S. footnotes that are based on the mandatory unwanted emission limits and non-mandatory unwanted
emission levels from certain active service stations specified in ITU Resolution 750.205 Subsequently,
NTIA recommended adding RR 5.338A to the U.S. Table as a means to implement these unwanted
emission limits/levels.206 Because there are no technical differences between NTIA’s corrected initial
recommendations and its subsequent recommendations for the protection of EESS (passive) operations,
we focus our discussion and base our proposals on the U.S. footnotes that NTIA initially provided. In
Table 7, below, we summarize these recommendations.
(Continued from previous page)


from earth stations using higher gain antennas. See ITU Resolution 750, Table 1-2. Because these services are
allocated exclusively for Federal use, NTIA’s original recommendations did not include these urgings, which have
been implemented in the NTIA Manual. For the RLS urging, see NTIA Manual at page 5-33, Section 5.5.3
(Criteria C), paragraph 4.3. For the FSS urging, see NTIA Manual at page 5-40, Section 5.6.2 (Unwanted Emission
Mask). NTIA’s current recommendation is to include RR 5.338A in the U.S. Table, which would result in these
urgings being included in the U.S. Table. Because the space operation service (Earth-to-space) allocation has been
removed from the 1427-1429 MHz band in the U.S. Table, we are not considering WRC-07’s non-mandatory
unwanted emission level (-36 dBW/27 MHz) in the 1400-1427 MHz passive band for earth stations transmitting in
the 1427-1429 MHz band. Finally, we note that that WRC-07’s non-mandatory unwanted emission levels
(-45 dBW/27 MHz for transportable radio-relay stations and -60 dBW/27 MHz for all other stations in the mobile
service) from stations in the mobile except aeronautical mobile service transmitting in the 1427-1429 MHz band are
the same as those specified for the mobile service (except for AMT stations) in the 1350-1400 MHz and
1429-1452 MHz bands.
204 For background information, see CPM-07 Report, Chapter 2 (Space Science Services), Agenda item 1.20,
at 27-42. In particular, we note that this agenda item addressed the compatibility between the EESS (passive) and
active services in adjacent or nearby bands as specified in Resolution 738 (WRC-03) and that the results of the
studies carried out for each band pair under this agenda item are documented in Report ITU-R SM.2092. See also
Updated Technical Studies by NASA for WRC-07 Agenda Item 1.20, document CBS/SG-RFC 2005/Doc.4.1(1).
205 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 5-6, footnotes USXXX [1.20/FS 1400], USXXX [1.20/MS 1400],
USXXX [1.20/ISS 23], USXXX [1.20/FS 31], USXXX [1.20/FSS 50], and USXXX [1.20/FS 52].
206 In addition, NTIA stated that WRC-07’s unwanted emission limits/levels are specified in terms of an integration
bandwidth of 27 MHz, 100 MHz, or 200 MHz depending on the band in question and that spaceborne passive
sensors integrate the total power over their entire measurement bandwidth. Therefore, based on the criteria to
protect the passive service equipment, NTIA stated that only the total power over the bandwidth specified is
important and that the worst case [spectral] power-density over a narrower bandwidth (such as that specified in the
Commission’s rules) is not relevant for determining compliance with WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission
limits and non-mandatory unwanted emission levels. See Letter from Karl B. Nebbia, Associate Administrator,
Office of Spectrum Management, NTIA, to Julius P. Knapp, Chief, OET, ET Docket No. 12-338, dated July 26,
2012 (NTIA WRC-07 Second Supplement) at 2-3.
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Table 7: WRC-07’s Unwanted Emission Limits/Levels in the EESS (passive) Bands

Passive band
Active service band
Unwanted emission limits/levels within the passive band
I. Mandatory Unwanted Emission Limits:
23.6-24 GHz
22.55-23.55 GHz:
-36 dBW in any 200 megahertz (-36 dBW/200 MHz) from NGSO ISS
NGSO ISS
systems prior to January 1, 2020; thereafter, -46 dBW/200 MHz
31.3-31.5 GHz
31-31.3 GHz: FS
-38 dBW/100 MHz from FS stations authorized after January 1, 2012
50.2-50.4 GHz
49.7-50.2 GHz and
-20 dBW/200 MHz from earth stations having an antenna gain less
50.4-50.9 GHz: FSS
than 57 dBi and -10 dBW/200 MHz from earth stations having an
Uplink207
antenna gain greater than or equal to 57 dBi
52.6-54.25 GHz 51.4-52.6 GHz: FS
-33 dBW/100 MHz
II. Non-mandatory Unwanted Emission Levels:
1400-1427 MHz 1350-1395 MHz and
-45 dBW/27 MHz from fixed point-to-point
1427-1435 MHz: FS
1390-1400 MHz and
Transportable radio-relay (TRR) stations: -45 dBW/27 MHz
1427-1452 MHz: MS
AMT stations in the 1429-1452 MHz segment: -28 dBW/27 MHz208
All other stations in mobile service: -60 dBW/27 MHz
110.
We observe that adoption of the mandatory unwanted emission limits was one of the most
contentious issues at WRC-07 and that there are significant differences between the U.S. Proposals for
WRC-07
for the bands above 23.6 GHz and the WRC-07 Final Acts.209 Further, it is not readily apparent
to us that the unwanted emission limits/levels adopted by WRC-07 are necessary for the protection of
spaceborne passive sensors in all cases.210 We also observe that NTIA’s recommended U.S. footnotes
would establish unwanted emission limits/levels that are more stringent than the existing limits in the
Commission’s rules for all of the frequency bands and radio services at issue.211 Nonetheless, after an


207 WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission limits in the 50.2-50.4 GHz band from FSS earth stations transmitting
in the 49.7-50.2 GHz and 50.4-50.9 GHz bands apply under clear-sky conditions. During fading conditions, earth
stations may exceed these limits when using uplink power control. See ITU Resolution 750, Table 1-1, note 2.
208 During staff discussions of this Notice, NTIA revised its recommendation to include WRC-07’s non-mandatory
unwanted emission level (-28 dBW/27 MHz) from AMT stations operating in the 1429-1452 MHz band. See ITU
Resolution 750, Table 1-2.
209 For example, the U.S. Proposals for WRC-07 state that “no changes are needed to the Radio Regulations to
protect the EESS (passive) in the 23.6-24.0 GHz band from unwanted emissions from the ISS in the
22.55-23.55 GHz band” because “[r]esults of studies documented in Report ITU-R SM.2092 show that unwanted
emissions from the ISS in the 22.55-23.55 GHz band are well below the recommended protection criteria for the
EESS (passive) in the 23.6-24.0 GHz band.” See Addendum 4 to U.S. Proposals at 5.
210 We note that the studies leading to the adoption of these unwanted emission limits/levels at WRC-07 appear to
have been conducted by primarily analyzing active services deployed in Europe. For example, passive sensors
aboard a European satellite receiving in the 1400-1427 MHz band encountered the presence of strong
radio-frequency interference (RFI) sources over southern Europe, the Middle East, and central Asia, “while the
American continent is almost free of interferers but for the DEW line (US Early Warning system) and an isolated
source in the Dominican Republic.” See “Characterisation of SMOS RF Interferences in the 1400-1427 MHz Band
as detected during the Commissioning Phase” at 4, which is available at
http://web1.see.asso.fr/ocoss2010/Session_1/20100531113920_Daganzo_OCOSS2010-Paper_SMOS_RFI_1400-
1427MHz_Final-Rev1.pdf (last visited on April 17, 2012).
211 Because the resolution bandwidths (BRES) (i.e., 27, 100, or 200 megahertz) used in the unwanted emission
limits/levels of ITU Resolution 750 are wider than the reference resolution bandwidth (BREF) used in the
Commission’s rules (i.e., 3 kilohertz, 4 kilohertz, or 1 megahertz), to compare the Commission’s existing unwanted
emissions limits with WRC-07’s limits/levels, we use a correction factor of 10 log10[(BRES in megahertz)/(BREF in
megahertz)] dB, which is added to the Commission’s unwanted emission limits, to determine the relevant per device
unwanted emission limit over a wider bandwidth. See 47 C.F.R. § 74.637(c)(3).
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extensive review of the Commission’s rules and the likely impact on non-Federal operations, based on
NTIA’s recommendations, we propose to implement the mandatory unwanted emission limits specified in
ITU Resolution 750 for all but one of the recommended frequency bands. For the 31-31.3 GHz band, we
solicit comment on whether it is necessary to adopt the mandatory unwanted emission limits specified in
ITU Resolution 750 or whether other mitigation techniques would be sufficient. We also propose to urge
operators to comply with the non-mandatory unwanted emission levels specified in ITU Resolution 750
for all of the frequency bands and services allocated for non-Federal use, except for Wireless Medical
Telemetry Service (WMTS) devices operating in the 1395-1400 MHz and 1427-1432 MHz bands.
Because we believe that the Commission’s existing out-of-band emission limit for these WMTS devices
effectively comply with WRC-07’s intent, we decline to propose that these devices must comply with
WRC-07’s non-mandatory unwanted emission level.212 We request comment on these proposals. In
particular, we seek comment on the advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated
with changing our rules. We discuss our proposals in detail, below.
111.
Part 25. In this sub-section, we discuss NTIA’s recommendation that we adopt WRC-07’s
mandatory unwanted emission limits for three frequency bands (22.55-23.55 GHz, 49.7-50.2 GHz, and
50.4-50.9 GHz) that are more stringent than the general emission limits for satellite communications
services regulated under Part 25 of the Commission’s rules.
112.
In the U.S. Table, the 22.55-23.55 GHz band is allocated to the fixed (FS), mobile (MS),
and inter-satellite (ISS) services on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use. US278 states that
non-geostationary satellite orbit systems in the inter-satellite service (NGSO ISS) may operate in this
band on a secondary basis to geostationary inter-satellite links. In addition, the 23.6-24 GHz band is
allocated to the EESS (passive), radio astronomy service (RAS), and space research service (SRS)
(passive) on a primary basis.
113.
Section 25.202(f) requires that (except for SDARS terrestrial repeaters) the mean power of
emissions shall be attenuated below the mean output power of the transmitter as follows: 1) 25 dB in any
4 kilohertz band (-25 dBW/4 kHz), the center frequency of which is removed from the assigned frequency
by more than 50 percent up to and including 100 percent of the authorized bandwidth, which is equivalent
to an emission limit of approximately 22 dBW/200 MHz; 2) 35 dB in any 4 kilohertz band
(-35 dBW/4 kHz), the center frequency of which is removed from the assigned frequency by more than
100 percent up to and including 250 percent of the authorized bandwidth, which is equivalent to an


212 Section 95.1115(b)(2) states that “out-of-band emissions above 960 MHz are limited to 500 μV/m as measured at
a distance of 3 m, using measuring equipment with an averaging detector and a 1 MHz measurement bandwidth.”
47 C.F.R. § 95.1115(b)(2). The formula for determining power given field strength is P = 0.3 E², where P is
transmitter power (EIRP) in W and E is field strength in V/m (after inserting a measurement distance of 3 m and
assuming a unity gain antenna). Thus, P = 75 nW = -71.25 dBW in the 1400-1427 MHz band, i.e., out-of-band
emissions must not exceed -71.25 dBW/MHz, which is approximately equal to -57 dBW/27 MHz. The
recommended limit in ITU Resolution 750 for unwanted emissions in the 1400-1427 MHz band from WMTS
devices transmitting in the 1395-1400 MHz and 1427-1432 MHz bands is -60 dBW/27 MHz. Although WRC-07’s
non-mandatory unwanted emission level is more restrictive than the limit governing these WMTS devices, we note
that WRC-07 adopted this limit based on the operation of International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and
Personal Digital Cellular (PDC) systems, and that, in comparison to these systems, WMTS use of the
1395-1400 MHz and 1427-1432 MHz bands is of a relatively limited nature. See CPM-07 Report at 2/1.20/1.3.1.2
(titled “Mobile service in the 1350-1400 MHz and 1427-1452 MHz bands”). We also note that because the use of
WMTS devices that operate in the 1395-1400 MHz and 1427-1432 MHz bands is restricted to “within a health care
facility” (see § 95.1107), these devices’ unwanted emissions outside of health care facilities will be substantially
attenuated by the building structures. These facts lead us to conclude that the Commission’s existing Part 95 WMTS
rules will fully protect EESS (passive) operations in the 1400-1427 MHz band over the long term, and therefore, no
action is required. In a separate proceeding, the Commission will consider whether Section 95.115(b)(2) should be
amended by replacing “out-of-band” with “unwanted.”
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emission limit of approximately 12 dBW/200 MHz; and 3) 43 + 10 log10 (transmitter power in watts) in
any 4 kilohertz band (-43 dBW/4 kHz), the center frequency of which is removed from the assigned
frequency by more than 250 percent of the authorized bandwidth, which is equivalent to an emission limit
of approximately 4 dBW/200 MHz.213
114.
NTIA recommends that we adopt WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission limits for
NGSO ISS systems transmitting in the 22.55-23.55 GHz band.214 Specifically, NTIA recommends that
NGSO ISS systems transmitting in the 22.55-23.55 GHz band be required to attenuate their unwanted
emissions as follows: For systems for which complete advance publication information is received by the
ITU’s Radiocommunication Bureau before January 1, 2020, the unwanted emission power in any
200 MHz of the 23.6-24 GHz band would be limited to -36 dBW measured at the input to an NGSO ISS
transmitting antenna (-36 dBW/200 MHz). For systems for which complete advance publication
information is received by the ITU’s Radiocommunication Bureau on or after January 1, 2020, the
unwanted emission power in any 200 MHz of the 23.6-24 GHz band would be limited to -46 dBW
measured at the input to the NGSO ISS transmitting antenna (-46 dBW/200 MHz).
115.
Assuming that the authorized bandwidth is 20 megahertz or less, we observe that if these
limits are adopted, NGSO ISS satellites transmitting in the 22.55-23.55 GHz band would be required to
attenuate their unwanted emissions from the existing limit in the 23.6-24 GHz band by an additional
40 dB (from 4 to -36 dBW/200 MHz) prior to January 1, 2020, and thereafter NGSO ISS satellites would
be required to attenuate their unwanted emissions in the 23.6-24 GHz band by an additional attention of
50 dB (from 4 to -46 dBW/200 MHz).215 We also note that: 1) Iridium is the only non-Federal NGSO ISS
licensee currently operating in the 22.55-23.55 GHz band; 2) it appears that Iridium’s ISS links do not
exceed the permissible interference criteria of Recommendation ITU-R RS.1029-2 for current passive
sensors; and 3) future passive sensors would require an unwanted emission level of EIRP of
-9.4 dBW/200 MHz for an Iridium-type system, and that “this level of attenuation can be easily met by
the ISS.”216 We propose to implement WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission limits in the
22.55-23.55 GHz band for all new NGSO ISS systems, and request comment on how these limits should
apply to Iridium’s satellites on a going-forward basis. See Appendix D, for the text of proposed footnote
US145, which would grandfather Iridium’s NGSO ISS satellites until such time as we determine how
these satellites will be required to meet WRC-07’s mandatory limit. If we adopt proposed footnote
US145, we also propose to amend Section 25.202(f) to reflect that decision in Part 25 of the
Commission’s rules.


213 See 47 C.F.R. §25.202(f).
214 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 5, footnote USXXX [1.20/ISS 23]. During the coordination process,
NTIA revised its recommended text to more closely follow Resolution 750 (WRC-07).
215 For authorized bandwidths larger than 20 megahertz, additional attenuation of unwanted emissions would be
required.
216 Iridium Constellation LLC, Iridium Satellite LLC, and Iridium Carrier Services (collectively Iridium) are
licensed to operate NGSO ISS links in the 23.18-23.8 GHz sub-band. For compatibility analysis between the
EESS (passive) in the 23.6-24 GHz band and the ISS in the 22.55-23.55 GHz band, see Section 7 of Report ITU-R
SM.2092. In particular, see Conclusions in Section 7.6. Using the ITU coordinated frequency range
(23.1835-23.3765 GHz) and authorized bandwidth (18 megahertz) listed for the HIBLEO-2 (Iridium) system, we set
the assigned frequency as 23.3675 GHz (9 megahertz down from the highest permitted frequency) and apply the
emission limitation rule in Section 25.202(f), which results in an unwanted emission power level of -25 dBW/4 kHz
(22 dBW/200 MHz) in the 23.3765-23.3855 GHz band; -35 dBW/4 kHz (12 dBW/200 MHz) in the
23.3855-23.4125 GHz band; and -43 dBW/4 kHz (4 dBW/200 MHz) above 23.4125 GHz. 47 C.F.R. § 25.202 (f).
See also http://www.itu.int/snl/freqtab_snl.html for ITU coordination information (enter 22550 to 23550 MHz for
frequency and select non-geostationary for space or earth station).
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116.
In the U.S. Table, the 48.2-50.2 GHz and 50.4-51.4 GHz bands are allocated to the FS,
MS, and FSS (Earth-to-space) on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use. The 50.4-51.4 GHz
band is also allocated to the MSS (Earth-to-space) on a primary basis for Federal and non-Federal use.
The 50.2-50.4 GHz band is allocated to the EESS (passive) and SRS (passive) on a primary basis.
117.
NTIA recommends that we adopt WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission limits for FSS
earth stations transmitting in the 49.7-50.2 GHz and 50.4-50.9 GHz sub-bands.217 Specifically, NTIA
recommends that FSS earth stations transmitting in the 49.7-50.2 GHz and 50.4-50.9 GHz sub-bands be
required to attenuate their unwanted emissions in the 50.2-50.4 GHz band as follows: For earth stations
having an antenna gain greater than or equal to 57 dBi, the unwanted emission power should be limited to
-10 dBW into the 200 megahertz of the 50.2-50.4 GHz EESS (passive) band (-10 dBW/200 MHz), as
measured at the input to the earth station antenna. For earth stations having an antenna gain less than
57 dBi, the unwanted emission power should be limited to -20 dBW into the 200 megahertz of the
50.2-50.4 GHz EESS (passive) band (-20 dBW/200 MHz), as measured at the input to the antenna. These
limits would apply under clear-sky conditions. During fading conditions, the limits could be exceeded by
FSS earth stations when using uplink power control.
118.
We note that if these limits are adopted, FSS earth stations transmitting in the
49.7-50.2 GHz and 50.4-50.9 GHz sub-bands would be required to attenuate their unwanted emissions in
the 50.2-50.4 GHz band as follows: By an additional 32 dB (from 22 to -10 dBW/200 MHz) for earth
stations having an antenna gain greater than or equal to 57 dBi and by an additional 42 dB (from 22 to
-20 dBW/200 MHz) for earth stations having an antenna gain less than 57 dBi.218 Commission records
indicate one licensee in the 48.2-50.2 GHz band.219 We note that Report ITU-R SM-2092 states that an
unwanted emission level of -20 dBW/200 MHz “can be met by the FSS systems considered in this
study.”220 As requested by NTIA, we propose to require that licensees of earth stations transmitting in the
49.7-50.2 GHz and 50.4-50.9 GHz sub-bands comply with WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission
limits in the 50.2-50.4 GHz band. See Appendix D for the text of proposed footnote US156. If we adopt
proposed footnote US156, we also propose to amend Section 25.202(f) to reflect that decision in Part 25
of the Commission’s rules. We request comment on these proposals. In particular, we seek comment on
how adoption of these mandatory unwanted emission limits for earth stations transmitting in the
49.7-50.2 GHz band will affect the implementation of the Commission’s band plan for the 36-51.4 GHz
band (V-band).221 We also seek comment on whether and how these provisions should apply to existing
licensees in these bands.


217 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 6, footnote USXXX [1.20/FSS 50].
218 For FSS earth stations transmitting in the 49.7-50.2 GHz and 50.4-50.9 GHz bands, Section 25.202(f) requires
that the mean power of emissions be attenuated below the mean output power of the transmitter by at least
-25 dB/4 kHz, which is equivalent to an emission limit of approximately 22 dBW/200 MHz. 47 C.F.R. § 25.202(f),
(f)(1).
219 Hughes Network Systems, LLC is licensed to operate in the 47.2-50.2 GHz band under Call Sign S2852. There
are no licensees in the 50.4-51.4 GHz band.
220 For compatibility analysis between the EESS (passive) systems operating in the 50.2-50.4 GHz band and
FSS (Earth-to-space) systems operating in the 47.2-50.2 GHz and 50.4-51.4 GHz bands, see Sections 10 and 11 of
Report ITU-R SM.2092. In particular, see Results of studies in Sections 10.6 and 11.6.
221 We note that the Commission has previously designated the 40-42 GHz downlink and 48.2-50.2 GHz uplink
bands for FSS use. In addition, RR 5.516B states that these bands have been identified for use by high-density
applications in the fixed-satellite service. We further note that, while the Commission has designated the
50.4-51.4 GHz band for use by Wireless Services, RR 5.547 states that the 51.4-52.6 GHz band is available for
high-density applications in the fixed service. See Allocation and Designation of Spectrum for Fixed-Satellite
Services in the 37.5-38.5 GHz, 40.5-41.5 GHz and 48.2-50.2 GHz Frequency Bands; Allocation of Spectrum to
Upgrade Fixed and Mobile Allocations in the 40.5-42.5 GHz Frequency Band; Allocation of Spectrum in the
(continued…)
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119.
Part 101. In this sub-section, we discuss NTIA’s recommendation that we adopt
WRC-07’s mandatory emission limits for two frequency bands (31-31.3 GHz and 51.4-52.6 GHz) that are
(or that would likely be) regulated under Part 101 (Fixed Microwave Services) of the Commission’s rules.
120.
In the ITU Allocation Table, the 31.3-31.5 GHz band is allocated solely to the passive
services – EESS (passive), RAS, and SRS (passive) – on a primary basis in all ITU Regions and all
emissions are prohibited in that frequency band (RR 5.340). Although the 31.5-31.8 GHz band is also
allocated to the passive services on a primary basis in all ITU Regions, in ITU Regions 1 and 3, this
frequency band is also allocated to the fixed and mobile except aeronautical mobile services on a
secondary basis. However, in 28 countries (including the Russian Federation and the United Kingdom),
the allocation of the 31.5-31.8 GHz band to the fixed and mobile except aeronautical mobile services is
on a primary basis (RR 5.546).222
121.
In the U.S. Table, the 31-31.3 GHz band is allocated to the FS and MS on a primary basis
for non-Federal use223 and this frequency band is licensed pursuant to Part 101 Subpart L of the
Commission’s rules – Local Multipoint Distribution Service (LMDS).224 The 31.3-31.8 GHz band is
allocated to the passive services on a primary basis and “no station shall be authorized to transmit” in this
band (US246).
122.
Section 101.111(a)(2)(iv) of the Commission’s rules states that the emission mask for
LMDS stations is determined by the equation A = 11 + 0.4 (P-50) + 10 log10B in Section 101.111(a)(2)(ii)
and the value for B in that equation is 40 megahertz, which can be simplified to A = 27.02 + 0.4 (P-50),
where A is the attenuation in dB below the mean output power level and P is the percent removed from
the center frequency of the transmitter bandwidth. Section 101.111(a)(2)(ii) also states that the
attenuation in any 1 megahertz bandwidth must be at least 11 dB and that attenuation greater than 56 dB
(or to an absolute power of less than -13 dBm/MHz (-43 dBW/MHz), which is equivalent to
-23 dBW/100 MHz), is not required. Using this equation for the lower Block B (31-31.075 GHz),
Block A (31.075-31.225 GHz), and upper Block B (31.225-31.3 GHz), we determine the required
(Continued from previous page)


46.9-47.0 GHz Frequency Band for Wireless Services; and Allocation of Spectrum in the 37.0-38.0 GHz and
40.0-40.5 GHz for Government Operations, IB Docket No. 97-95, First Report and Order, 13 FCC Rcd 24649
(1998), (FCC 98-336); Second Report and Order, 18 FCC Rcd 25428 (2003) (FCC 03-296).
222 At WRC-12, Oman was added to the list of countries in RR 5.546. In addition, RR 5.149 states that in making
assignments to stations of other services to which the 31.2-31.3 GHz band (and other bands) are allocated,
administrations are urged to take all practicable steps to protect the RAS from harmful interference.
223 The 31-31.3 GHz band is also allocated to the standard frequency and time signal-satellite service (space-to-
Earth) on a secondary basis for Federal and non-Federal use. RR 5.149 has been implemented in the United States
as US342 and applicants for airborne or space station assignments in the 31-31.3 GHz band are urged to take all
practicable steps to protect radio astronomy observations in adjacent bands from harmful interference (US211).
224 In 1996, the Commission designated the 27.5-28.35 and 29.1-29.25 GHz (limited to transmissions in the
hub-to-subscriber direction) bands for use by LMDS systems, and in 1997, designated the 31-31.3 GHz band for
LMDS use. In 1998, the Commission finalized the LMDS rules and auctioned this spectrum (see Auction 17) as
Block A (27.5-28.35, 29.1-29.25, and 31.075-31.225 GHz) and Block B (31-31.075 and 31.225-31.3 GHz). When
the Commission redesignated the 31-31.3 GHz band, it required LMDS licensees to protect all incumbent licensees
except for incumbent Local Television Transmission Service (LTTS) licensees in Block B. The incumbent licensees
are discussed in Appendix E. See Rulemaking to Amend Parts 1, 2, 21, and 25 of the Commission’s Rules to
Redesignate the 27.5-29.5 GHz Frequency Band, to Reallocate the 29.5-30 GHz Frequency Band, to Establish Rules
and Policies for Local Multipoint Distribution Service and for Fixed Satellite Services, First Report and Order and
Fourth Notice of Proposed Rulemaking
, 11 FCC Rcd 19005 (1996) (FCC 96-311); Second Report and Order, Order
on Reconsideration, and Fifth Notice of Proposed Rulemaking
, 12 FCC Rcd 12545 (1997) (FCC 97-82); Third
Order on Reconsideration
, 13 FCC Rcd 4856 (1998) (FCC 98-15). See also 47 C.F.R. Part 101 Subpart L – Local
Multipoint Distribution Service.
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attenuation at 31.3 GHz, assuming that the transmitted signal is centered in the respective LMDS band.
Specifically, because the calculated attenuation for lower Block B operations of 147 dB exceeds the
maximum required attenuation of 56 dB, these operations are only required to attenuate their emissions to
-13 dBm/MHz (-43 dBW/MHz), which is equivalent to an emission limit of -23 dBW/100 MHz. Block A
(31.075-31.225 GHz) operations are required to attenuate their emissions by approximately 47 dB below
the mean output power level to an emission level of -17 dBW/MHz, which is equivalent to an emission
limit of 3 dBW/100 MHz (assuming a maximum mean output power of 30 dBW). Upper Block B
(31.225-31.3 GHz) operations are required to attenuate their emissions by approximately 27 dB below the
mean output power level to an emission level of 3 dBW/MHz, which is equivalent to an emission limit of
23 dBW/100 MHz (assuming a maximum mean output power of 30 dBW).225
123.
NTIA recommends that we adopt WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission limit for fixed
stations transmitting in the 31-31.3 GHz band.226 Specifically, NTIA recommends that fixed stations
transmitting in the 31-31.3 GHz band be required to limit their unwanted emission power in any
100 megahertz of the 31.3-31.5 GHz band to -38 dBW (-38 dBW/100 MHz), as measured at the input to a
transmitting antenna. We observe if this limit is adopted, under the Commission’s existing rules and the
conditions assumed in the previous paragraph, fixed stations transmitting in the 31-31.3 GHz band would
be required to attenuate their unwanted emissions in the 31.3-31.5 GHz passive band as follows: By an
additional 15 dB (from -23 to -38 dBW/100 MHz) for stations in the 31-31.075 GHz band (lower LMDS
Block B); up to an additional 41 dB (from 3 to -38 dBW/100 MHz) for stations in the 31.075-31.225 GHz
band (LMDS Block A); and up to an additional 61 dB (from 23 to -38 dBW/100 MHz) for stations in the
31.225-31.3 GHz band (upper LMDS Block B).
124.
We note that WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission limit of -38 dBW/100 MHz was
chosen because EESS systems need to operate in the entire 200 megahertz allocation and cannot
implement a guardband at the lower edge of the EESS band (31.3-31.5 GHz).227 We further note that the
Report ITU-R SM.2092 seems to indicate that the band plan used in certain ITU Region 1 countries
ensures that the levels of unwanted emissions from FS systems falling into the 31.3-31.5 GHz band meet
this level.228
125.
We believe that the adoption of WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission limit for fixed
stations transmitting in the 31-31.3 GHz band may be unnecessary to satisfy the operational requirements
of EESS (passive) systems in ITU Region 2, because unlike in ITU Regions 1 and 3, no station can be


225 See 47 C.F.R. §§ 101.111(a)(2)(ii), (a)(2)(iv), and 101.1005(a).
226 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 5, footnote USXXX [1.20/FS 31].
227 We observe that the EESS (passive) actually has a 500 megahertz allocation (31.3-31.8 GHz) in all ITU Regions.
However, in ITU Regions 1 and 3, the 31.5-31.8 GHz band is also allocated to the fixed and mobile except
aeronautical mobile service on a primary basis in 28 countries and on a secondary basis in all other countries. For
compatibility analysis between EESS (passive) systems operating in the 31.3-31.5 GHz band and fixed service (FS)
systems operating in the 31-31.3 GHz band, see Section 9 of Report ITU-R SM.2092. In particular, see mitigation
techniques for EESS (passive) in Section 9.5.1.
228 Specially, we note that Section 9.5.2 of Report ITU-R SM.2092 states that: “The use of a guardband of 31 MHz
for systems deployed in accordance with Annex 8 to Recommendation ITU-R F.746 and, which use more stringent
mask for unwanted emissions than those given in Recommendation ITU-R SM.1541 and limits for spurious
emissions given in Recommendation ITU-R SM.329 (Category B) ensure that the levels of unwanted emissions
from FS systems falling into the band 31.3-31.5 GHz meet the acceptable power given in Tables 9-4 and 9-5 (about
–38 dB(W/100 MHz)). Other mitigation techniques such as filtering may also be used to ensure that the maximum
acceptable power within the passive band may be met.” We note that Recommendation ITU-R F.746-9 contains
only seven annexes. It appears that Annex 7 of Recommendation ITU-R F.746-9 is the same as the old Annex 8
which pertained to FS in certain (CEPT) countries in Europe. See Section 9 of Report ITU-R SM.2092, in
particular, see mitigation techniques for FS in Section 9.5.2.
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authorized to transmit in the 31.5-31.8 GHz band in Region 2. That is, because co-channel interference is
prohibited in Region 2, we believe that the unwanted emission limit in the larger EESS (passive) band
(31.3-31.8 GHz) for fixed stations transmitting in the adjacent LMDS band (31-31.3 GHz) could be
significantly higher in ITU Region 2. We note that Report ITU-R SM.2092 does not appear to take this
basic allocation fact into account. Accordingly, we propose to urge licensees of fixed stations in the
31-31.3 GHz band to limit the maximum elevation angle of the antenna main beam to 20° and to employ
automatic transmitter power control (ATPC). See Appendix D for the text of proposed footnote NG60. If
we adopt proposed footnote NG60, we also propose to amend Section 101.111 to reflect that decision in
Part 101 of the Commission’s rules. We request comment on our analysis and proposal.229
126.
In making this proposal, we are cognizant of the fact that ITU Resolution 750 states that
long-term protection of the EESS (passive) in the 31.3-31.5 GHz and other bands is vital to weather
prediction and disaster management.230 We solicit comment on whether we should adopt WRC-07’s
mandatory unwanted emission limit for the 31-31.3 GHz band or, alternatively, the following emission
limit: For all new stations in the 31-31.3 GHz band, the power of any emission in any 1 megahertz of the
31.3-31.8 GHz band shall be attenuated below the transmitter power (P) within the licensed bands of
operation, in watts, by a factor not less than 43 + 10 log10 (P) dB (-43 dBW/MHz), which is equivalent to
-23 dBW/100 MHz. Are there other mitigation techniques that we could adopt which would be less
burdensome to fixed service licensees? We request comment on whether we should revise the
non-Federal MS allocation in the 31-31.3 GHz band to a mobile except aeronautical mobile service
allocation.231
127.
In the U.S. Table, the 51.4-52.6 GHz band is allocated to the FS and MS on a primary
basis for Federal and non-Federal use.232 The 52.6-54.25 GHz band is allocated to the EESS (passive)
and SRS (passive) on a primary basis. The Commission has not yet added the 51.4-52.6 GHz band to
Part 101, and thus, non-Federal licensees are currently not operating in this band. NTIA recommends that
we adopt WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission limit for fixed stations transmitting in the 51.4-52.6
GHz band.233 Specifically, NTIA recommends that fixed stations transmitting in the 51.4-52.6 GHz band
be required to attenuate their unwanted emission power in any 100 megahertz of the 52.6-54.25 GHz band
to -33 dBW (-33 dBW/100 MHz).234 We propose to require that future licensees of fixed stations
transmitting in the 51.4-52.6 GHz band comply with WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission limit. See


229 We note that the ITU Radio Regulations permit non-conforming operations on a non-interference basis.
Therefore, for the United States to remain in compliance with its ITU treaty obligations without adopting WRC-07's
mandatory unwanted emission limits for any radio service and frequency band, we must determine that non-Federal
stations operating in accordance the Commission’s rules will not cause harmful interference to passive sensors
operating in accordance with the ITU Allocation Table and other provisions of the ITU Radio Regulations. In
addition, we must amend the Commission’s rules to require that any such non-conforming stations must
immediately cease operations if we subsequently determine that they are causing harmful interference to any passive
sensors. See ARINC v. FCC, 928 F.2d 428, 443-44 (D.C. Cir., 1991). See also Cable and Wireless v. FCC, 166
F.3d 1224, 1230 (D.C. Cir., 1999); Katel Limited Liability Co. v. AT&T, 607 F.3d 60, 67 (2nd Cir., 2010) (addressing
the treaty status of the ITU Radio Regulations).
230 See ITU Resolution 750 (Rev. WRC-12) at considering f).
231 On May 16, 2011, staff from the OET Laboratory Division searched the OET Equipment Authorization System
(EAS) and found no grants for Part 87 equipment at frequencies above 20 GHz, and thus we believe it is unlikely
that the non-Federal AMS allocation in the 31-31.3 GHz band will be used in the foreseeable future.
232 RR 5.547 states that the 51.4-52.6 GHz band is available for high-density applications in the FS.
233 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 6, footnote USXXX [1.20/FS 52].
234 For compatibility analysis between EESS (passive) systems operating in the 52.6-52.8 GHz band and fixed
service (FS) systems operating in the 51.4-52.6 GHz band, see Section 12 of Report ITU-R SM.2092. In particular,
see Results of the studies in Section 12.6.
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Appendix D for the text of proposed footnote US157. If we adopt proposed footnote US157, we also
propose to amend Section 101.111 to reflect that decision in Part 101 of the Commission’s rules.
128.
Next, we discuss NTIA’s request that WRC-07’s non-mandatory unwanted emission level
be applied to certain radio services in four active frequency bands (1390-1395 MHz, 1427-1432 MHz,
1432-1435 MHz, and 1435-1452 MHz) that are adjacent to, or nearby, the 1400-1427 MHz band, which
is allocated to the EESS (passive), RAS, and SRS (passive).235
129.
Parts 27 and 90. In the U.S. Table, the 1390-1395 MHz and 1432-1435 MHz bands are
allocated to the FS and mobile except aeronautical mobile service (MS (except AMS)) on a primary basis
for non-Federal use. These bands are regulated under Part 27 of the Commission’s rules. The 1427-1432
MHz band is allocated to the land mobile service (LMS) (telemetry and telecommand) and to the FS
(telemetry and telecommand) for non-Federal use. The 1427-1432 MHz band is regulated under Part 90
of the Commission’s rules (except for WMTS devices operating pursuant to Part 95).
130.
For operations in the 1390-1395 MHz and 1432-1435 MHz bands, Sections 27.53 (a)(5)
and (j) together require that the power of any emission outside the licensee’s frequency band(s) of
operation must be attenuated below the transmitter power P by at least 43 + 10 log (P) dB, as measured
over a 1-megahertz resolution bandwidth, which is equivalent to a maximum out-of-band emission limit
of -43 dBW/MHz.236 For a 27-megahertz resolution bandwidth, an unwanted emission limit of
-43 dBW/MHz is equivalent to an unwanted emission level of approximately -28.7 dBW/27 MHz. The
emission masks and corresponding resolution bandwidths applicable to Part 90 operations are specified in
Section 90.210. Because the 1427-1432 MHz band is not listed in the table titled “Applicable Emission
Masks” in Section 90.210, the entry “All other bands” in the table is applicable. Because Part 90
telemetry equipment does not require the use of an audio low pass filter, Emission Mask C in Section
90.210(c)(3) applies to Part 90 telemetry operations in the 1427-1432 MHz band. In addition, per
Section 90.210(o), to determine compliance with a particular emission mask, the emissions of operations
on frequencies above 1 GHz should be measured with a resolution bandwidth of at least 1 megahertz.
Thus, for Part 90 telemetry operations in the 1427-1432 MHz band, Sections 90.210(c)(3) and (o)
together require that the power of any emission outside the licensee’s frequency band(s) of operation must
be attenuated below the unmodulated carrier output power P by at least 43 + 10 log (P) dB as measured
over a 1-megahertz resolution bandwidth (-43 dBW/MHz) which, as noted above, is equivalent to an
unwanted emission level of approximately -28.7 dBW/27 MHz.237
131.
NTIA recommends that we adopt WRC-07’s non-mandatory unwanted emission level for
certain types of stations in the fixed and mobile services transmitting in the 1350-1400 MHz and
1427-1452 MHz bands.238 Specifically, NTIA recommends that operators of stations of point-to-point
systems in the fixed service that transmit in the 1350-1395 MHz and 1427-1435 MHz bands be
encouraged to take all reasonable steps to ensure that their stations’ unwanted emission power does not
exceed -45 dBW in the 1400-1427 MHz band (-45 dBW/27 MHz). NTIA also recommends that
operators of stations in the mobile service (except for transportable radio-relay stations) that transmit in
the 1390-1400 MHz and 1427-1452 MHz bands be encouraged to take all reasonable steps to ensure that


235 The 1390-1400 MHz and 1427-1432 MHz bands were transferred for non-Federal exclusive use. Federal
operations (except for devices authorized by the FCC for the Wireless Medical Telemetry Service) in these bands
are on a non-interference basis to non-Federal operations and shall not constrain implementation of non-Federal
operations. The 1432-1435 MHz band was transferred from Federal to non-Federal use as a mixed-use band. See
Spectrum Reallocation Final Report
, NTIA Special Publication 95-12, p. iv.
236 See 47 C.F.R. §§ 27.73(a)(5), (j).
237 See 47 C.F.R. §§ 90.210(c), (o).
238 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 5, footnotes USXXX [1.20/FS 1400] and USXXX [1.20/FS 1400].
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their stations’ unwanted emission power does not exceed -60 dBW in the 1400-1427 MHz band
(-60 dBW/27 MHz), and that operators of transportable radio-relay (TRR) stations in the mobile service
be encouraged to take all reasonable steps to ensure that unwanted emission power does not exceed
-45 dBW in the 1400-1427 MHz band (-45 dBW/27 MHz).
132.
We note that if these non-mandatory unwanted emission levels are adopted, licensees of
fixed point-to-point and TRR stations transmitting in the 1390-1395 MHz and 1432-1435 MHz bands
would be encouraged to attenuate their unwanted emissions in the 1400-1427 MHz band as follows: By
an additional 16.3 dB (from -28.7 to -45 dBW/27 MHz) for fixed point-to-point and TRR stations, and by
an additional 31.3 dB (from -28.7 to -60 dBW/27 MHz) for stations in the mobile service (except for
AMT stations, discussed below). We also note that TRR stations can generally be characterized as either
temporary base stations or repeaters that are employed as restoration or temporary facilities, or as military
tactical radio-relay systems. Thus, the less stringent unwanted emission limit in ITU Resolution 750 for
TRR stations (-45 dBW/27 MHz), which is 16.3 dB more attenuation than required by the Commission’s
existing rules, is not expected to provide significant relief for Part 27 and Part 90 licensees.
133.
We propose to encourage licensees authorized pursuant to Parts 27 and 90 of the
Commission’s rules that operate stations in the mobile service or fixed point-to-point systems in the
1390-1395 MHz and 1427-1435 MHz bands to take all reasonable steps to ensure that their stations’
unwanted emission power does not exceed WRC-07’s non-mandatory level. See Appendix D for the text
of proposed footnote NG338A. If we adopt proposed footnote NG338A, we also propose to amend
Sections 27.53(j) and 90.210 to reflect that decision in Parts 27 and 90 of the Commission’s rules.
Because the 1350-1390 MHz band is not allocated to the non-Federal FS or MS and because the
1429-1435 MHz band is not allocated for non-Federal AMT use, we decline to propose to add the
recommended U.S. footnotes to these bands.239 We address AMT use of the 1435-1452 MHz band in the
next section.
134.
Part 87. In the U.S. Table, the 1435-1525 MHz band is allocated for Federal/non-Federal
shared AMT use. Section 87.303(d)(2) states that the authorized bandwidths for AMT stations operating
in the 1435-1525 MHz band are normally 1, 3, or 5 megahertz.240 Section 87.139, paragraphs (e) and (f),
which apply to telemetry or telecommand operations in the 1435-1525 MHz band, require that all
emissions below 1434 MHz be attenuated to at least -55 dBW/3 kHz, which is equivalent to
-15.5 dBW/27 MHz.241


239 We also note that US398 prohibits airborne operations in the 1427-1432 MHz band and that Federal use of the
aeronautical mobile service in the 1432-1435 MHz band (which is limited to the areas specified in US361) is light
(7 assignments, all of which are authorized significantly more output power than is permitted for AMT (25 W) and
4 of which specifically state that the system is not to be used for telemetry).
240 Note 8 to the table in Section 87.137(a) states that the authorized bandwidth is equal to the necessary bandwidth
for frequency or digitally modulated transmitters used in aeronautical telemetering and associated aeronautical
telemetry or telecommand stations operating in the 1435-1525 MHz band. The table in Section 87.131 lists F2D,
F7D, and F9D as the authorized emissions and 25 watts as the maximum power for flight test land stations and
aircraft stations in the UHF frequency band (1435-1525 MHz). Note 3 to the table in Section 87.131 states that
transmitter power may be increased to overcome line and duplexer losses but must not exceed 25 watts delivered to
the antenna. 47 C.F.R. §§ 87.131, 87.137(a).
241 Specifically, on any frequency removed from the assigned frequency by more than 50 percent of the authorized
bandwidth plus 1.0 megahertz, the attenuation must be at least 55 + 10 log10 pY dB, when measured in a
3.0 kilohertz bandwidth, where pY is the mean power of the transmitter. For an authorized bandwidth of
5 megahertz and an assigned frequency of 1437.5 MHz, all emissions below 1434 MHz must be attenuated to at
least -55 dBW/3 kHz, which is equivalent to -15.3 dBW/27 MHz. 47 C.F.R. § 87.139(e), (f).
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135.
NTIA recommends that we encourage Federal and non-Federal operators of AMT stations
transmitting in the 1435-1452 MHz sub-band to take all reasonable steps to ensure that their stations’
unwanted emission power does not exceed -28 dBW in the 1400-1427 MHz band (-28 dBW/27 MHz).242
We note that the effect of this recommendation is that operators of AMT stations transmitting in the
1435-1452 MHz sub-band would be urged to attenuate their stations’ unwanted emissions in the
1400-1427 MHz band by an additional 12.5 dB (from -15.5 to -28 dBW/27 MHz) compared to that
required by Section 87.139, paragraphs (e) and (f).
136.
We propose to encourage Federal and non-Federal operators of AMT stations that transmit
in the 1435-1452 MHz sub-band comply with WRC-07’s non-mandatory unwanted emission level. See
Appendix D for the text of proposed footnote US338A. If we adopt proposed footnote US338A, we also
propose to amend Section 87.139 to reflect that decision in Part 87 of the Commission’s rules. We
request comment on whether AMT operators that cannot meet WRC-07’s recommended non-mandatory
unwanted emission level should be required to meet their operational requirements in the 1452-1525 MHz
sub-band prior to operating in the 1435-1452 MHz sub-band.
137.
We invite comment on each of the proposals and on the advantages and disadvantages of
each proposal. As part of the record we seek to develop, we are interested in quantifying the costs and
benefits associated with the adoption of WRC-07’s unwanted emission limits/levels and the advantages
and disadvantages of implementing new passive service protections. We seek information about costs to
current licensees; potential costs and loss of benefits to possible future users of this spectrum; the benefits
to EESS (passive) users, and any other relevant costs and benefits that would be associated with our
adoption of WRC-07’s unwanted emission limits/levels. How, if at all, should the characteristics of these
frequency bands affect our consideration of whether to adopt WRC-07’s unwanted emission limits/levels?
Finally, we solicit comment on NTIA’s current recommendation that RR 5.338A should be added to the
U.S. Table (in lieu of the aforementioned U.S. footnotes). In Table 8, below, we compare WRC-07’s
unwanted emission limits/levels (column 2) with the Commission’s existing emission limits applied
across the wider specified bandwidth within an EESS (passive) band (column 3).


242 As previously stated, NTIA revised its recommendation to include WRC-07’s non-mandatory unwanted emission
level from AMT stations operating in the 1429-1452 MHz band. ITU Resolution 750 states that the
“[r]ecommended maximum level of unwanted emission power from active service stations in a specified bandwidth
within the [1400-1427 MHz] EESS (passive) band” is “-28 dBW in the 27 MHz of the EESS (passive) band for
aeronautical telemetry stations.” See ITU Resolution 750, Table 1-2.
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Table 8: WRC-07’s Unwanted Emission Limits/Levels and Existing FCC Limits

Passive Band
Requested Limits
Normalized FCC
Existing FCC
Active Service Band(s),
Emission Limits
Emission Limits
FCC Rule Section(s)
I.A. Mandatory Unwanted Emission Limits for Space Services:
23.6-24 GHz
-36 dBW/200 MHz
4 dBW/200 MHz
-43 dBW/4 kHz
22.55-23.55 GHz,
-46 dBW/200 MHz
25.202(f)(3)
50.2-50.4 GHz
-10 dBW/200 MHz
4 dBW/200 MHz
-43 dBW/4 kHz
49.7-50.2 & 50.4-50.9
-20 dBW/200 MHz
GHz, 25.202(f)(3)
I.B. Mandatory Unwanted Emission Limits for the Fixed Service:
31.3-31.5 GHz
-38 dBW/100 MHz
-23 dBW/100 MHz
-43 dBW/MHz
31-31.3 GHz,
101.111(a)(2)(ii), (iv)
52.6-54.25 GHz -33 dBW/100 MHz
FS allocation in the 51.4-52.6 GHz band is currently unused in the U.S.
II. Non-mandatory Unwanted Emission Levels for the Fixed and Mobile Services:
1400-1427 MHz -60 dBW/27 MHz for -56.9 dBW/27 MHz
-71.25 dBW/MHz
1395-1400 and
MS (except TRR and
for WMTS devices
1427-1432 MHz,
AMT)
(operate in the LMS) 95.1115(b)(2)
-45 dBW/27 MHz for -28.7 dBW/27 MHz
-43 dBW/MHz for
1390-1395 and
FS (point-to-point)
the MS (except
1432-1435 MHz,
and TRR
AMS) and for the FS
27.53(j); 1427-1432
MHz, 90.210(c)(3)
-28 dBW/27 MHz
-15.5 dBW/27 MHz
-55 dBW/3 kHz
1435-1525 MHz,
for AMT in
for AMT
87.139(e), (f)
1429-1452 MHz
2.

Protection of Passive Sensors Receiving in Active Service Bands

138.
WRC-07 also revised the sharing criteria for Earth exploration-satellite service (EESS)
(passive) and space research service (SRS) (passive) operations in the 10.6-10.68 GHz and 36-37 GHz
bands, which are shared on a co-equal basis with the fixed service (FS) and mobile service (MS) in the
ITU Allocation Table.243
a.
10.6-10.68 GHz
139.
In the ITU Allocation Table, the 10.55-10.68 GHz band is allocated to the FS and mobile
except aeronautical mobile service (MS (except AMS)) on a primary basis, and to the radiolocation
service (RLS) on a secondary basis, in all ITU Regions. The 10.6-10.68 GHz band is also allocated to the
EESS (passive), radio astronomy service (RAS), and SRS (passive) on a primary basis in all ITU
Regions.244 RR 5.149 states that in the 10.6-10.68 GHz band, administrations are urged to take all


243 More specifically, the 10.6-10.58 GHz band is allocated to the MS (except AMS). See footnote 117, supra, for
the definitions of EESS, SRS, and passive sensor.
244 The 10.6-10.7 GHz band – which includes the 10.68-10.7 GHz passive band segment – is allocated to the
EESS (passive), RAS, and SRS (passive) on a primary basis in all ITU Regions. The 10.6-10.7 GHz band is of
primary interest to the EESS (passive) for the measurement of rain, snow, sea state, and ocean wind for ocean and
land surfaces and also for the measurement of soil moisture. This frequency band is considered all-weather region
suitable for using multi-spectral systems to establish surface material properties. The data derived from these
measurements are also used for natural disaster prediction. A number of EESS (passive) sensors are already using
this band for such measurements, and additional sensors are planned in the near future. These measurements are
fully operational (regular use of the data, continuity of service, several usable data products) and are used on a
worldwide basis. The retrieved data are part of a set of measurements performed in five interrelated bands
(6.425-7.25 GHz, 10.6-10.7 GHz, 18.6-18.8 GHz, 23.5-24 GHz, and 36-37 GHz) that are used and exchanged
between the meteorological organizations in all ITU Regions. See CPM-07 Report, Chapter 2, Issue B, at 10-14.
See also Recommendation ITU-R RS.515-4, Table 1.
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practicable steps to protect the RAS from harmful interference. Prior to WRC-07, RR 5.482 stated that,
in the 10.6-10.68 GHz band, stations of the FS and MS (except AMS) shall be limited to a maximum
EIRP of 40 dBW (10 kW) and that the power delivered to the antenna shall not exceed -3 dBW
(0.5 W).245
140.
In its proposals for WRC-07, the United States proposed that WRC-07 modify RR 5.482
by adding the following recommendations: “In making assignments in the band 10.6-10.68 GHz,
administrations should bear in mind the needs of the Earth exploration-satellite (passive) and space
research (passive) services. Administrations are urged to limit the transmit power delivered to the
antenna of new stations authorized in the fixed service to a maximum of -10 dBW and new stations
authorized in the mobile service (except aeronautical mobile) to a maximum of -17 dBW.”246 We note
that the United States did not propose to remove the 40 dBW EIRP limit.
141.
WRC-07 revised RR 5.482 to remove the 40 dBW EIRP limit and adopted RR 5.482A,
which states that Resolution 751 applies for sharing of the 10.6-10.68 GHz band among the EESS
(passive), FS, and MS (except AMS).247 In Resolution 751, WRC-07 resolves “to urge administrations to
take all reasonable steps to comply with the sharing criteria in Tables 1 to 4 contained in Annex 1 to this
Resolution when bringing into use stations” in the EESS (passive), FS, and MS (except AMS).248 We
note, in particular, that Tables 2 and 3 list the parameters and values for fixed stations of point-to-point
and point-to-multipoint systems, respectively.249
142.
In the U.S. Table, the 10.55-10.68 GHz band is allocated to the FS on a primary basis for
non-Federal use. US265 states that in the 10.6-10.68 GHz band, the FS is restricted to 40 dBW EIRP and
that the power delivered to the antenna must not exceed -3 dBW/250 kHz. The 10.6-10.68 GHz band is
also allocated to the EESS (passive), SRS (passive), and RAS on a co-primary basis for Federal and
non-Federal use.250
143.
Section 101.113(a) states that the maximum allowable EIRP per polarization for fixed
stations in the 10,600-10,680 MHz band is +40 dBW.251 We note that this rule contains an exception252


245 RR 5.482 (originally numbered as RR 831) was added to the ITU Allocation Table at the 1979 World
Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-79). In 1979, the restrictions on the FS and MS (except AMS) in RR 831
were not applicable in the 20 countries listed in that footnote. As of WRC-07, the restrictions in RR 5.482 are not
applicable in 35 countries.
246 See Addendum 1 to U.S. Proposals, Agenda item 1.2, proposed modification of RR 5.482, at 3.
247 See Report ITU-R RS.2096 (2007), titled “Sharing of the 10.6-10.68 GHz band by the fixed and mobile services
and the Earth exploration-satellite service (passive),” Section 5.2, at 38.
248 See ITU Radio Regulations, Resolution 751, resolves 1. We note that Resolution 751 does not specify the
sharing criteria for the SRS (passive) in the 10.6-10.68 GHz band. See ITU Radio Regulations, Resolution 751.
249 Id. at Annex 1 to Resolution 751, Tables 2 and 3.
250 The EESS and SRS allocations are directly listed in the U.S. Table. US277 states that the 10.6-10.68 GHz band
is also allocated on a primary basis to the RAS, that the RAS will not receive protection from fixed stations that are
licensed to operate in the one hundred most populous urbanized areas (1990 census), and that the list of
observatories operating in this band is contained in US355.
251 47 C.F.R. § 101.113(a).
252 Note 5 to the table in Section 101.113(a) reads as follows: “The output power of a DEMS System nodal
transmitter shall not exceed 0.5 watt per 250 kHz. The output power of a DEMS System user transmitter shall not
exceed 0.04 watt per 250 kHz. The transmitter power in terms of the watts specified is the peak envelope power of
the emission measured at the associated antenna input port. The operating power shall not exceed the authorized
power by more than 10 percent of the authorized power in watts at any time. Frequencies from 10,600-10,680 MHz
are subject to footnote US265 in the Table of Frequency Allocations in § 2.106 of the Commission's rules. Stations
(continued…)
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that authorizes a maximum output power of 0.5 watt per 250 kilohertz (-3 dBW/250 kHz) for a use
(DEMS System nodal transmitters) that has been relocated to another band.253
144.
NTIA recommends that we respond to the WRC-07 actions as follows. First, it
recommends that we amend US265 by revising the opening sentence to read: “In the band 10.6-10.68
GHz, the transmit power at the antenna port shall not exceed -3 dBW for stations of systems in the fixed
service.”254 This would eliminate the current EIRP limit of 40 dBW for FS stations transmitting on
frequencies in the 10.6-10.68 GHz band and would limit all fixed stations to -3 dBW EIRP, regardless of
authorized bandwidth.
145.
Second, it recommends that we add the following advisory language to US265: In order to
minimize interference to the EESS (passive), operators of stations of point-to-point systems are urged to
limit the maximum transmitter power supplied to the input to the transmitting antenna to -15 dBW and the
transmitting antenna elevation angle to a maximum of 20°. In the same manner, the transmitter power
supplied to the input to the transmitting antenna for hub stations of point-to-multipoint systems should not
exceed -7 dBW, and the off-axis EIRP should not exceed -6 dBW, -11 dBW, and -13 dBW for
transmitting antenna angles above the horizontal plane of 20°, 45°, and 90°, respectively. Customer
stations should be operated with a maximum transmitting antenna elevation angle of 20°. In addition, the
transmitter power supplied to the antenna input terminals for customer stations should not exceed
-8 dBW, and the off-axis EIRP should not exceed -18 dBW above 45° from the horizontal plane.
Automatic transmitter power control (ATPC) may be used to increase the transmitter power supplied to
the input to the antenna by a value corresponding to the ATPC range, up to a maximum of -3 dBW.255
146.
NTIA subsequently recommended that we add RR 5.482A to the U.S. Table and amend
US265 by revising only the first sentence as discussed above in paragraph 144.256
(Continued from previous page)


authorized prior to April 1, 2003 to exceed the 40 dBW limit may continue to operate at their authorized output
power level indefinitely, provided that neither end point of the relevant link is relocated.”
253 Specifically, the Commission reallocated the 10.565-10.615 GHz and 10.63-10.68 GHz segments of the
10.55-10.68 GHz band from fixed point-to-multipoint use (which was known as the Digital Electronic Message
Service (DEMS)) to fixed point-to-point use. See Redevelopment of Spectrum to Encourage Innovation in the Use
of New Telecommunications Technologies, ET Docket No. 92-9, Second Report and Order, 8 FCC Rcd 6495 at
6497 & 6507-10 (1993). In that action, the Commission grandfathered incumbent DEMS systems. Currently, there
is a single grandfathered 10 GHz DEMS licensee (Puerto Rico Telephone Company, Inc), which holds two licenses.
Call sign WHK833 authorizes a single DEMS Nodal Station in Aguas Buenas (18° 15' 53.8" N, 66° 5' 5.5" W) to
communicate with DEMS User Stations within a 25 mile radius of the Nodal Station using a 2.5 megahertz channel
at 10,600-10,602.5 MHz (Channel 5-A). Call sign WHB418 authorizes a single DEMS Nodal Station in Guaynabo
(18° 24' 42.8" N, 66° 5' 37.5" W) to communicate with DEMS User Stations within a 25 mile radius of the Nodal
Station using a 2.5 megahertz channel at 10,607.5-10,610 MHz (Channel 8-A). The DEMS User Stations transmit
on 2.5 megahertz channels at 10,665-10,667.5 GHz (Channel No. 5-B) or 10,672.5-10,675 MHz (Channel No. 8-B).
254 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 2, modification to US265.
255 ATPC is a feature of a digital microwave radio system that adjusts the transmitter output power. ATPC allows
the transmitter to operate at less than maximum power for most of the time. In a radio employing ATPC, the
transmit power is reduced to a level needed for reliable communications. This level is below the maximum power
during normal operation conditions. When the receiver detects a reduction in signal level, a control signal is sent to
the far end transmitter, instructing it to increase the power output to compensate for the signal reduction. The power
output is limited to the licensed (maximum) transmit power. Guidelines for use of ATPC are set forth in the TIA
Telecommunications Systems Bulletin TSB 10, “Interference Criteria for Microwave Systems (TSB 10).”
47 C.F.R. § 101.3.
256 That is, NTIA recommends that the non-mandatory maximum values for stations in the fixed service discussed in
paragraph 145, supra, not be listed in US265. Instead, RR 5.482A would provide a cross reference to these values.
See NTIA WRC-07 Second Supplement at 2.
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147.
We propose to revise US265 in a manner generally consistent with NTIA’s initial
recommendations. Specifically, at the request of NTIA, we propose to remove the phrase “per 250 kHz”
from the opening sentence of US265 and to add the advisory language for fixed point-to-point systems.
However, because the Commission relocated the only fixed point-to-multipoint use (DEMS) from the
10.6-10.68 GHz band in 1993, we decline to add the requested advisory language for point-to-multipoint
systems. Instead, we propose to prohibit point-to-multipoint use of the 10.6-10.68 GHz band. The
proposed prohibition would also support the removal of the “per 250 kHz” exception, which would
reduce antenna input power from -3 dBW/250 kHz to simply -3 dBW.257 We also propose to urge
licensees to employ automatic transmitter power control (ATPC), to permit licensees holding a valid
authorization as of the effective date of the Report and Order in this proceeding to continue to operate as
authorized, and to renumber US265 as US482 (based on RR 5.482). We believe that the proposed actions
are the minimum necessary to protect spaceborne passive sensors that receive in the 10.6-10.7 GHz band.
See Appendix D for the text of proposed footnote US482. If we adopt proposed footnote US482, we also
propose to amend Section 101.111 to reflect that decision in Part 101 of the Commission’s rules. We
solicit comment on these proposals. In particular, we seek comment on the advantages and
disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated with changing our rules.
148.
Licensing information shows that at least 96 percent of all FS stations in the
10.6-10.68 GHz band supply not more than -3 dBW of transmitter power to the antenna and that
approximately 21 percent of these stations supply not more than -15 dBW (31.6 mW) of transmitter
power.258 In addition, while only 41 percent of these transmitters list an elevation angle, essentially all of
these transmitters (all but two of 2,689) have an elevation angle of 20° or less. Therefore, we request
comment on whether we should: 1) prohibit FS stations with main beam elevation angles greater than 20°
from transmitting on frequencies in the 10.6-10.68 GHz band;259 2) require FS stations (using paired
frequencies) to transmit on frequencies in the 10.6-10.68 GHz band using the lower elevation angle; and
3) require the use of ATPC.
149.
It is unclear to us why WRC-07 deleted the maximum EIRP limit of 40 dBW from
RR 5.482, and in particular, how its deletion would allow us to better protect co-channel spaceborne
passive sensors in the 10.6-10.68 GHz band. If we decide to raise the maximum EIRP limit in the
10.6-10.68 GHz band, we believe that the EIRP should not exceed 48 dBW (63.1 kW).260 We request
comment on this issue.


257 See footnote 252, supra.
258 EIRP is the power delivered by a transmitter to the antenna (Pta) plus the gain of the transmitting antenna (Gt),
i.e., EIRP (dBW) = EIRP (dBm, which is the unit used in the ULS for fixed microwave stations) - 30 dB =
Pta (dBW) + Gt (dBi). Thus, Pta (dBW) = EIRP (dBm) - Gt - 30. The ULS-Micro database accessed on
July 31, 2011, shows that there were 6,525 transmitters licensed to operate on frequencies in the 10.6-10.68 GHz
band, that EIRP and/or Gt was not listed in the ULS for 142 of these transmitters, that 6,278 transmitters operated
with Pta ≤ -3 dBW, and that 1,368 transmitters operated with Pta ≤ -15 dBW. Thus, the power supplied to the
antenna is -3 dBW or less for 96.2 percent of all transmitters and 98.4 percent of those transmitters having both
EIRP and Gt listed in the ULS.
259 We note that interference simulations indicate that the interference power level would increase by approximately
8 dB (from -125 to -117 dBW) when the elevation angles of the main beam of fixed stations are increased from 20°
to 25°. Further, we note that the ITU-R Report states that “FS elevations above 5° are rare in actual operating
systems.” See Report ITU-R RS.2096, figure 23, p. 38; first Note, p. 39. Licensing information also shows that
98 percent of the transmitters listing an elevation angle have an elevation angle of 5° or less.
260 The ITU-R Report on sharing of the 10.6-10.68 GHz band by the FS and EESS (passive) specifies a maximum
EIRP of 48 dBW for the FS. See Report ITU-R RS.2096, Table 2 (titled “Operating parameters of P-P fixed link
equipment in the 10.6-10.68 GHz band”).
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150.
Finally, because we anticipate that many applicants will continue to request -3 dBW as the
maximum transmitter power delivered to the antenna, we request comment on whether we should urge
licensees to limit the off-axis EIRP above 20° to -10 dBW.261 Because of the national interest in
protecting essential data for weather forecasting and weather related natural disaster forecasting, we are
especially interested in comments that would address the advantages that implementation of our proposals
would create for EEES (passive) operations. We also seek comment on what costs or disadvantages
would be associated with the proposed rules, and how to quantify any costs. We further seek comment on
the current NTIA proposal to include RR 5.482A in the U.S. Table (instead of adding WRC-07’s
non-mandatory transmitter power and antenna elevation angel limits to US265, which was initially
recommended).
b.
36-37 GHz
151.
In the ITU Radio Regulations, the 36-37 GHz band is allocated to the FS, MS,
EESS (passive), and SRS (passive) on a primary basis in all ITU Regions. RR 5.149 states that, in
making assignments to other services to which the 36.43-36.5 GHz band segment is allocated,
administrations are urged to protect the RAS from harmful interference.
152.
In the U.S. Table, the 36-37 GHz band is a Federal/non-Federal shared band and the
aforementioned allocations have been adopted. The only differences between the International Table and
the U.S. Table are the footnotes. Specifically, RR 5.149 has been implemented in the U.S. Table as
US342. US263 states that EESS and SRS operations in four frequency bands, including the 36-37 GHz
band, “shall not receive protection from the fixed and mobile services operating in accordance with the
Table of Frequency Allocations.”262 The Commission has not issued service rules for FS and MS use of
the 36-37 GHz band and there are no non-Federal licensees operating in that band.
153.
WRC-07 adopted RR 5.550A, which states that, for sharing of the 36-37 GHz band
between the EESS (passive) service and the FS and MS, Resolution 752 shall apply. Resolution 752
states that WRC-07 resolves that stations in the FS and MS shall comply with the sharing criteria
contained in Tables 2 and 3 of Annex 1 to Resolution 752.263
154.
NTIA recommends that we adopt two footnotes to incorporate the sharing criteria for
stations in the FS and MS contained in Resolution 752.264 The first of these footnotes states that in the
36-37 GHz band, for stations of point-to-point systems in the fixed service, the transmitter power supplied
to the input to the antenna shall not exceed -10 dBW, and the elevation angle shall be limited to a
maximum of 20°. For stations of point-to-multipoint systems in the fixed service, the footnote requires
that the transmitter power supplied to the input to the antenna of hub stations not exceed -5 dBW, the
transmitter power supplied to the input of the antenna of customer stations not exceed -10 dBW, and the
elevation angle be limited to a maximum of 20°. In the case of point-to-point systems, and customer
stations of point-to-multipoint systems, using automatic transmitter power control (ATPC), the first
footnote permits the maximum transmitter power supplied to the input to the antenna to be increased by a
value corresponding to the ATPC range, up to a maximum of -7 dBW. The second of these footnotes


261 Note 3 of Resolution 751 reads as follows: “In the case of point-to-point fixed service used for unidirectional
transmissions for broadcasting applications, the maximum transmitter power at the antenna port may be increased up
to -3 dBW. For such applications, administrations are urged to limit the off-axis e.i.r.p. above 20° elevation to a
level of -10 dBW.” See ITU Resolution 751, Annex 1, Table 2 (titled “Stations of point-to-point systems in the
fixed service”), note 3.
262 US263 applies to the 21.2-21.4 GHz, 22.21-22.5 GHz, 36-37 GHz, and 56.26-58.2 GHz bands.
263 For additional information, see Report ITU-R RS.2095, titled “Sharing of the 36-37 GHz band by the fixed and
mobile services and the Earth exploration-satellite service (passive).”
264 See NTIA WRC-07 Recommendations at 3, footnotes USXX2 [1.2/FS 36] and USXX3 [1.2/MS 36].
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state that, in the 36-37 GHz band, for stations of the mobile service, the transmitter power supplied to the
input to the antenna shall not exceed -10 dBW. Under this footnote, the maximum transmitter power
supplied to the input to the antenna may be increased up to -3 dBW for stations used for public safety and
disaster management. NTIA also recommends that the 36-37 GHz band be removed from US263.
155.
We propose to implement the spectrum sharing criteria adopted at WRC-07 for the
36-37 GHz band by adopting NTIA’s recommended footnotes as a single U.S. footnote, US550A (based
on RR 5.550A). We also propose to remove the 36-37 GHz band from US263 and to renumber this
footnote as US532 (based on RR 5.532). We observe that the non-Federal FS and MS allocations in the
36-37 GHz band are unused.265 We further note that the 36-37 GHz band is one of the five interrelated
bands (around 6, 10, 18, 24, and 36 GHz) that are used by meteorological organizations in all ITU
Regions and we believe that it would be prudent for the United States to fully protect passive sensor
operations in the 36 GHz band. We solicit comment on these issues. In particular, we seek comment on
the advantages and disadvantages, and other costs and benefits associated with changing our rules. We
also seek comment on whether fixed point-to-multipoint systems should be prohibited in the 36-37 GHz
band. See Appendix D for proposed footnote US550A and for the revised text of US532 (currently
numbered as US263). If we adopt proposed footnote US550A, we also propose to amend Section
101.111 to reflect that decision in Part 101 of the Commission’s rules.

G.

Other Matters

156.
We propose to amend the definition of two terms currently listed in Section 2.1 of the
rules and to update Section 2.100 of the rules. First, we propose to include the ITU abbreviation for the
Earth exploration-satellite service, i.e., “EESS,” and to make minor conforming changes in the definition
of the EESS such that the definition in Part 2 of the Commission’s rules comports with the ITU Radio
Regulations
.266 Second, we propose to add the parenthetical statement “(absolute or isotropic gain)” to
the definition of EIRP and, because EIRP is the commonly used abbreviation in the United States, to also
list “(e.i.r.p. or EIRP)” as the abbreviation for equivalent isotropically radiated power. Finally, we
propose to amend Section 2.100 to read as follows: “The ITU Radio Regulations, Edition of 2008, have
been incorporated to the extent practicable in Subparts A and B of this part.” We request comment on
these proposals.
157.
As we have discussed above in conjunction with our specific proposals, we seek detailed
information as to the specific advantages and disadvantages, including specific costs, associated with our
proposed rules and whether the potential benefits of our proposals outweigh any associated disadvantages
or costs. We seek comment both for those bands where our proposals would affect incumbent
non-Federal operations and, more generally, for the proposals in this action as a whole. We believe that
the adoption of these proposals would provide a benefit to the American public by providing greater
opportunities for making effective use of the spectrum resource. In consultation with NTIA, we propose
to incorporate the ITU Radio Regulations edition of 2008 to the extent practicable in the Commission’s
rules. Because these proposals are generally based on the U.S Proposals for WRC-07 and would
implement a treaty obligation of the United States,267 we also believe that taking these actions are
necessary to maintaining our ability to act as spectrum management leaders within the international
community. The proposals herein would promote spectrum harmonization and foster regulatory certainty


265 Most of the Federal terrestrial assignments within the 36-38.6 GHz band operate in the 36-37 GHz band. The
38.6-40 GHz band is the only non-Federal fixed service band between 31.3 GHz and 71 GHz that is available for
Part 101 licensing. See 47 C.F. R. § 101.101.
266 See ITU Radio Regulation No. 1.51 for the definition of the EESS. The EESS abbreviation is listed in the
Prototype of the integrated Database of ITU Terms and Definitions.
267 See Constitution of the International Telecommunication Union, Article 6.
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and would ultimately reduce the overall costs associated with spectrum use. We seek comment on this
analysis.

V.

ORDER

158.
In this section, we correct grammatical, typographical, and display errors in the U.S. Table
and also remove inconsistencies between the non-Federal Table and the service rules. Specifically, we
revise US58 (renumbered as US128), US338 (US97), US348 (US109), US361 (US83), NG12 (NG32),
NG42 and NG134 (combined and renumbered as NG50), NG168 (NG43), G27, and G117, and we
replace the reference to RR 5.288 in the U.S. Table with new U.S. footnote US288. We also revise
coordinates in US117 and US355 (US131) and update a cross reference in US277 (US130). See
Section 2.106 in Appendix F for the revised text of these footnotes. We also simplify the U.S. Table by
combining four bands into two larger bands. None of these rule changes, which we discuss in detail
below, require prior notice and an opportunity for comment under the Administrative Procedure Act
(APA). Section 553(b)(B) of the APA provides exceptions to the notice-and-comment requirements for
rulemakings when, among other things, the agency finds for good cause that the notice and comment
procedures are “impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest” with respect to the rules at
issue.268 Here, the changes we are making in the rules correct minor errors in the Allocation Table,
implement revisions adopted in prior Commission orders, and otherwise entail non-substantive matters.
As such, they constitute routine, “clean-up” matters that entail no substantive decisions of any
consequence or significance to industry or the general public.269 Accordingly, we find that it is
“unnecessary,” within the meaning of Section 553(b)(B), to provide notice and an opportunity for
comment before adopting these rule revisions.
159.
US117. NTIA requests that we correct the coordinates for Table Mountain Observatory in
US117 by revising the latitude from 40° 07' 50" N to 40° 08' 02" N.270 We note that the requested change
would have little or no impact on non-Federal operations because paragraph (b) of US117 states that
non-Federal use of the 406.1-410 MHz band is limited to the radio astronomy service and as provided by
US13 (i.e., two channels that are available for the specific purpose of transmitting hydrological and
meteorological data). Accordingly, we revise the coordinates of the Table Mountain Observatory in
US117 as requested by NTIA.
160.
General Aviation Air-Ground Stations. Section 22.805 lists 13 channel pairs that are
allocated for the provision of radiotelephone service to airborne mobile subscribers in general aviation
aircraft.271 We amend NG12 to accurately reflect the frequency bands that may be assigned to domestic
public land and mobile stations to provide a two-way air-ground public radiotelephone service per


268 5 U.S.C. § 553(b)(B).
269 See Utility Solid Waste Activities Group v. EPA, 236 F.3d 749, 755 (D.C. Cir. 2001) (quoting South Carolina v.
Block
, 558 F.Supp. 1004, 1016 (D.S.C. 1983), for the proposition that the “unnecessary” exception applies “to those
situations in which the administrative rule is a routine determination, insignificant in nature and impact, and
inconsequential to the industry and to the public”); see also Texaco, Inc., v. FPC, 412 F.2d 740, 743 (3d Cir. 1969)
(“‘Unnecessary’ refers to the issuance of a minor rule or amendment in which the public is not particularly
interested.” (quoting Attorney General’s Manual on the Administrative Procedure Act 12-13 (1947)).
270 See footnote 198, supra.
271 The 13 center frequencies listed for ground station transmissions commence at 454.675 MHz and end on
454.975 MHz. The 13 center frequencies listed for airborne mobile station transmissions commence at
459.675 MHz and end on 459.975 MHz. Each of these channel pairs has a bandwidth of 20 kilohertz and the
spacing between channels is 25 kilohertz. 47 C.F.R. § 22.805. We subtract half the spacing between channels
(12.5 kilohertz) from the lowest center frequency in each frequency band (454.675 and 459.675 MHz), and we add
half the spacing between channels (12.5 kilohertz) to the highest center frequency in each band (454.975 and
459.975 MHz), which results in the 454.6625-454.9875 and 459.6625-459.9875 MHz bands.
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Section 22.805. Accordingly, we replace the 454.4-455 MHz and 459.4-460 MHz bands in NG12 with
the more specific 454.6625-454.9875 MHz and 459.6625-459.9875 MHz bands, respectively. We also
take this opportunity to renumber NG12 in frequency order as NG32.
161.
Radiolocation Use of 420-450 MHz. The WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order renumbered
US217 as US269,272 but did not update a cross reference to this footnote in Section 90.103(c)(21).273
Accordingly, we amend Section 90.103 (“Radiolocation service”) by revising the cross reference in the
last sentence of paragraph (c)(21) from “US217” to “US269.”
162.
On-board Communications. In 2006, the Commission added Section 80.373(g)(2) to its
rules to make four frequencies (457.5375 MHz, 457.5625 MHz, 467.5375 MHz, and 467.5625 MHz)
available for narrowband use by on-board ship communication stations within U.S. territorial waters.274
An international footnote, RR 5.287, provides for on-board communication stations on these frequencies
outside the territorial waters of the United States. A separate footnote, RR 5.288, makes different
frequencies available for on-board communication stations within the territorial waters of the
United States. RR 5.288 is incomplete because it does not include the four narrowband frequencies listed
in RR 5.287 that the Commission allocated in 2006 for use by on-board communication stations in the
U.S. territorial waters. To correctly show the 2006 Commission action in the Allocation Table, we
replace RR 5.288 with a new U.S. footnote, which we number as US288. US288 incorporates the text
from RR 5.288 and adds the four frequencies contained in RR 5.287. We also add a cross reference to
Part 80 (Stations in the Maritime Mobile Services) to the 462.7375-467.5375 MHz and
467.5375-467.7375 MHz bands in the Allocation Table.
163.
US361. The 1432-1435 MHz band was a Government transfer band and US361 lists
23 operating areas where Federal stations in the fixed and mobile services may operate indefinitely on a
primary basis. At NTIA’s request, we amend US361 by correcting the name of a grandfathered site and
by removing a grandfathered site.275 Specifically, we correct the Location name for 37° 29' North
latitude, 114° 14' West longitude from “Nellis AFB, NV” to “Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR).”
Next, because the “AUTEC” location is not within the United States and its insular areas (the listed
coordinates are on Andros Island in The Bahamas), we remove this location from US361. Finally, we
reorganize and simplify the text of US361 and renumber this U.S. footnote in frequency order as US83.


272 US269 reads as follows: “In the band 420-450 MHz, the following provisions shall apply to the non-Federal
radiolocation service: (a) Pulse-ranging radiolocation systems may be authorized for use along the shoreline of the
conterminous United States and Alaska. (b) In the sub-band 420-435 MHz, spread spectrum radiolocation systems
may be authorized within the conterminous United States and Alaska. (c) All stations operating in accordance with
this provision shall be secondary to stations operating in accordance with the Table of Frequency Allocations.
(d) Authorizations shall be granted on a case-by-case basis; however, operations proposed to be located within the
areas listed in paragraph (a) of US270 should not expect to be accommodated.”
273 See WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order, 25 FCC Rcd at 9735 paras. 60-61. 47 C.F.R. § 90.103(c)(21).
274 Territorial Sea (also know as territorial waters), as defined by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of
the Sea, is a belt of coastal waters extending 12 nautical miles from the baseline point (the mean low low watermark
(MLLW)) of a coastal state. Amendment of Parts 13 and 80 of the Commission’s Rules Concerning Maritime
Communications, WT Docket No. 00-48, Memorandum Opinion and Order, Third Report and Order, and Further
Notice of Proposed Rule Making
, 21 FCC Rcd 10282, 10307 para. 45 (2006) (FCC 06-129). Section 80.373(g)(2)
reads as follows: “Where needed, equipment designed for 12.5 kHz channel spacing using the additional
frequencies 457.5375 MHz, 457.5625 MHz, 467.5375 MHz, and 467.5625 MHz may be introduced for on-board
communications.” 47 C.F.R. § 80.373(g)(2).
275 NTIA requested that we make these corrections during the coordination process.
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164.
NG168. In the Mobile Use of MSS Bands R&O, the Commission revised the text of
NG168.276 We further amend the text of NG168 to make the following grammatical corrections. First,
we introduce the MSS abbreviation, i.e., “mobile-satellite service (MSS)” in the first sentence and remove
the introduction of the MSS abbreviation from the last sentence. Second, we make the word “component”
plural in the first sentence. We also take this opportunity to renumber NG168 in frequency order as
NG43.
165.
US385. The WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order added “the current text of US269, which
urges fixed and mobile except aeronautical mobile licensees in the 2655-2690 MHz band to coordinate
their systems, along with the secondary allocation status of the radio astronomy service in the
2655-2690 MHz band that is shown in the U.S. Table, to US311, and renumber[ed] US311 as US385.”277
However, the cross reference to US311 in Section 15.242(e) was not updated at that time. Accordingly,
we amend the first sentence in paragraph (e) of Section 15.242 by revising “US 311” to read “US385.”
166.
US338. The text of US338 applies to the 2305-2310 MHz and 2310-2320 MHz bands, but
the reference to US338 is shown only in the 2305-2310 MHz band. We are adding the missing
U.S. footnote, which we renumber in frequency order as US97, to the 2310-2320 MHz band.
167.
US348. Primary Federal operations in the 3650-3700 MHz band are limited to three
grandfathered radar sites, which are codified in US348 and in Section 90.1331(b)(1).278 NTIA has
informed us that one of these sites – Naval Station Pascagoula – has been closed. Accordingly, we amend
US348 and Section 90.1331(b)(1) to remove the unused Federal site. We also take this opportunity to
renumber US348 in frequency order as US109.
168.
10-10.5 GHz. With the concurrence of NTIA, we amend the Federal Table by revising the
“10-10.45” GHz band and the reference to “G2” to read “10-10.5” and “G32,” respectively.279 We also
revise the text of three footnotes (US58, NG42, NG134) that pertain to the 10-10.5 GHz band. First, we
revise US58 by adding the existing amateur-satellite service allocation to the list of permitted non-Federal
services in the 10-10.5 GHz band so that this footnote correctly lists all permitted non-Federal services,
and we renumber this footnote in frequency order as US128. Second, we combine the text of NG42 and
NG134 (which require that non-Federal stations in the radiolocation service not cause harmful
interference to the amateur service in the 10-10.5 GHz band, and that these stations not cause harmful
interference to the amateur-satellite service in the 10.45-10.5 GHz sub-band, respectively) and renumber
the new footnote in frequency order as NG50.


276 NG168 currently reads as follows: “Except as permitted below, the use of the 2180-2200 MHz band is limited to
the mobile-satellite service (MSS) and ancillary terrestrial components offered in conjunction with an MSS network,
subject to the Commission’s rules for ancillary terrestrial components and subject to all applicable conditions and
provisions of an MSS authorization. In the 2180-2200 MHz band, where the receipt date of the initial application
for facilities in the fixed and mobile services was prior to January 16, 1992, said facilities shall operate on a primary
basis and all later-applied-for facilities shall operate on a secondary basis to the MSS; and not later than
December 9, 2013, all such facilities shall operate on a secondary basis.” Fixed and Mobile Services in the Mobile
Satellite Service Bands at 1525-1559 MHz and 1626.5-1660.5 MHz, 1610-1626.5 MHz and 2483.5-2500 MHz, and
2000-2020 MHz and 2180-2200 MHz, ET Docket No. 10-142, Report and Order, 26 FCC Rcd 5710 (2011)
(Mobile Use of MSS Bands R&O).
277 See Table Clean-up Order, 25 FCC Rcd at 9735 para. 61.
278 See 47 C.F.R. §§ 2.106, footnote US348; 90.1331.
279 In the WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order, we combined the 10-10.45 GHz and 10.45-10.5 GHz bands in the Federal
Table. See WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order, 25 FCC Rcd at 9797. In doing so, the frequency band was inadvertently
not changed to 10-10.5 GHz. In addition, the reference to G32 was mistakenly changed to G2. The Chairman of the
IRAC brought these errors to our attention during the normal coordination process for this document.
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169.
US277 and US355. Initially, NTIA requested that we correct the coordinates for the
Arecibo Observatory in US355 by approximately 68 meters (from 18° 20' 39" N, 66° 45' 10" W to 18° 20'
37" N, 66° 45' 11" W).280 Subsequently, NTIA requested that we correct the elevations of nearly all of
the radio astronomy observatories specified in US355.281 We note that the requested changes are
de minimis in nature and would affect only future non-geostationary satellite orbit systems in the
fixed-satellite service (space-to-Earth). Accordingly, we amend US355 by correcting the coordinates of
the Arecibo Observatory and the elevations of 12 of the observatories. We also renumber US355 in
frequency order as US131 and add missing references to this footnote in the 10.6-10.68 GHz (Federal and
non-Federal Tables) and 10.7-11.7 GHz bands (Federal Table). We revise US277 by updating the cross
reference from US355 to US131. Finally, we renumber US277 as US130, which places the allocation in
US130 adjacent to the list of radio astronomy observatories in US131.
170.
G27 and G117. At NTIA’s request, we amend the text of two Federal Government
footnotes in Section 2.106 of our rules. First, we amend G27 by revising “255” to read “225.”282 Second,
we amend G117 by replacing the “17.3-17.7 GHz” and “17.8-21.2 GHz” band entries with
“17.375-17.475 GHz” and “17.6-21.2 GHz.” This action updates G117 by listing the sub-bands that are
specified in US402 (17.375-17.475 GHz and 17.6-17.7 GHz) and by restricting Federal fixed-satellite
service use of the 17.7-17.8 GHz band (which is authorized in US401) to military systems.283
171.
Allocation Display Changes. In the U.S. Table, we generally do not subdivide a frequency
band unless it is necessary to do so, e.g., when we are adding a radio service in only a segment of an
existing frequency band. In the non-Federal Table, the only difference between the 19.7-20.1 GHz and
20.1-20.2 GHz bands is RR 5.529, and the only differences between the 29.5-29.9 GHz and 29.9-30 GHz
bands are RR 5.529 and RR 5.543. Accordingly, we merge these bands to form the 19.7-20.2 GHz and
29.5-30 GHz bands.


280 See footnote 198, supra.
281 Specifically, NTIA requests that we correct the elevations of 12 of the 13 observatories specified in US355 as
shown below. See NTIA WRC-07 Second Supplement at 4.
Elevation (in meters)
Observatory
From
To
Change
Arecibo Observatory, PR…………….…............
496 ………………. 497 …………...….
+1
Green Bank Telescope (GBT), WV…..…….......
825 ………………. 807 ………...…….
-18
Very Large Array (VLA), Socorro, NM…...…...
2126 ……………... 2115 ……………..
-11
Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Stations:
Brewster, WA……………………….……...
255 ………………. 250 ………………
-5
Fort Davis, TX……………………….…….
1615 ……………... 1606 ……………..
-9
Hancock, NH……………………….............
309 …………….… 296 ………………
-13
Kitt Peak, AZ………………………............
1916 ……………... 1902 ……………..
-14
Los Alamos, NM…………………...............
1967 ……………... 1962 ……………..
-5
Mauna Kea, HI…………….………….........
3720 ……………... 3763 ……………..
+43
North Liberty, IA…………………………..
241 …………….… 222 ………………
-19
Owens Valley, CA…………………............
1207 ……………... 1196 ……………..
-11
Pie Town, NM………...................................
2371 ……………... 2365 ……………..
-6
282 See NTIA Manual at p. 4-170 for the correct text of footnote G27.
283 See letter from Karl B. Nebbia, Associate Administrator, Office of Spectrum Management, NTIA to
Julius P. Knapp, Chief, OET, dated May 23, 2011, ET Docket No. 12-338. NTIA subsequently revised the text of
G117 during the coordination process. See paragraphs 92 and 95, supra, for the proposals to revise US334 and
US401.
63

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FCC 12-140

VI.

PROCEDURAL MATTERS

A.

Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

1.

Ex Parte

172. This proceeding shall be treated as a “permit-but-disclose” proceeding in accordance with
the Commission’s ex parte rules.284 Persons making ex parte presentations must file a copy of any
written presentation or a memorandum summarizing any oral presentation within two business days after
the presentation (unless a different deadline applicable to the Sunshine period applies). Persons making
oral ex parte presentations are reminded that memoranda summarizing the presentation must: (1) list all
persons attending or otherwise participating in the meeting at which the ex parte presentation was made;
and (2) summarize all data presented and arguments made during the presentation. If the presentation
consisted in whole or in part of the presentation of data or arguments already reflected in the presenter’s
written comments, memoranda, or other filings in the proceeding, the presenter may provide citations to
such data or arguments in his or her prior comments, memoranda, or other filings (specifying the relevant
page and/or paragraph numbers where such data or arguments can be found) in lieu of summarizing them
in the memorandum. Documents shown or given to Commission staff during ex parte meetings are
deemed to be written ex parte presentations and must be filed consistent with rule 1.1206(b). In
proceedings governed by rule 1.49(f) or for which the Commission has made available a method of
electronic filing, written ex parte presentations and memoranda summarizing oral ex parte presentations,
and all attachments thereto, must be filed through the electronic comment filing system available for that
proceeding and must be filed in their native format (e.g., .doc, .xml, .ppt, searchable .pdf). Participants in
this proceeding should familiarize themselves with the Commission’s ex parte rules.
2.

Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

173.
Pursuant to the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA),285 the Commission has prepared an
Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (IRFA) of the possible significant economic impact on small
entities by the proposals considered in this Notice. The text of the IRFA is set forth in Appendix E.
Written public comments are requested on this IRFA. Comments must be filed in accordance with the
same filing deadlines as for comments on the Notice, and they should have a separate and distinct heading
designating them as responses to the IRFA. The Commission will send a copy of the Notice, including
the IRFA, to the Chief Counsel for Advocacy of the Small Business Administration.286
3.

Paperwork Reduction Act Analysis

174.
This document does not contain proposed information collection(s) subject to the
Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), Public Law 104-13. In addition, therefore, it does not contain
any new or modified “information collection burden for small business concerns with fewer than
25 employees,” pursuant to the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act of 2002, Public Law 107-198,
see 44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(4).
4.

Filing Requirements

175.
Pursuant to sections 1.415 and 1.419 of the Commission’s rules 47 CFR §§ 1.415, 1.419,
interested parties may file comments and reply comments on or before the dates indicated on the first


284 47 C.F.R. §§ 1.1200 et seq.
285 See 5 U.S.C. § 603. The RFA has been amended by the Contract with America Advancement Act of 1996,
Pub. L. No. 104-121, 110 Stat. 847 (1996) (CWAAA). Title II of the CWAAA is the Small Business Regulatory
Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 (SBREFA).
286 5 U.S.C. § 603(a)
64

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FCC 12-140

page of this document. Comments may be filed using the Commission’s Electronic Comment Filing
System (ECFS). See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (1998).
§
Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed electronically using the Internet by accessing the
ECFS: http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/ecfs2/.
§
Paper Filers: Parties that choose to file by paper must file an original and one copy of each filing.
If more than one docket or rulemaking number appears in the caption of this proceeding, filers
must submit two additional copies for each additional docket or rulemaking number.
Filings can be sent by hand or messenger delivery, by commercial overnight courier, or by first-
class or overnight U.S. Postal Service mail. All filings must be addressed to the Commission’s
Secretary, Office of the Secretary, Federal Communications Commission.
§
All hand-delivered or messenger-delivered paper filings for the Commission’s Secretary
must be delivered to FCC Headquarters at 445 12th St., SW, Room TW-A325,
Washington, DC 20554. The filing hours are 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. All hand deliveries
must be held together with rubber bands or fasteners. Any envelopes and boxes must be
disposed of before entering the building.
§
Commercial overnight mail (other than U.S. Postal Service Express Mail and Priority
Mail) must be sent to 9300 East Hampton Drive, Capitol Heights, MD 20743.
§
U.S. Postal Service first-class, Express, and Priority mail must be addressed to 445 12th
Street, SW, Washington DC 20554.
176.
People with Disabilities: To request materials in accessible formats for people with
disabilities (braille, large print, electronic files, audio format), send an e-mail to fcc504@fcc.gov or call
the Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau at 202-418-0530 (voice), 202-418-0432 (tty).
177.
For further information, contact Tom Mooring, Office of Engineering and Technology,
(202) 418-2450, or via the Internet at tom.mooring@fcc.gov.

B.

Order

1.

Paperwork Reduction Act

178.
This Order contains no new or modified information collection requirements subject to the
Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), Public Law 104-13. In addition, therefore, it does not contain
any new or modified “information collection burden for small business concerns with fewer than 25
employees,” pursuant to the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act of 2002, Public Law 107-198, see 44
U.S.C. 3506(c)(4).
2.

Congressional Review Act

179.
The Commission will send a copy of this Order in a report to be sent to Congress and the
Government Accountability Office pursuant to the Congressional Review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A).
3.

Accessible Formats

180.
To request information in accessible formats (computer diskettes, large print, audio
recording, and Braille), send an e-mail to fcc504@fcc.gov or call the Commission’s Consumer and
Governmental Affairs Bureau at (202) 418-0530 (voice), (202) 418-0432 (TTY). This document can also
be downloaded in Word and Portable Document Format (PDF) at http://www.fcc.gov.
65

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FCC 12-140

VII.

ORDERING CLAUSES

181.
Accordingly, IT IS ORDERED that pursuant to Sections 1, 4, 301, 302(a), and 303 of the
Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. Sections 151, 154, 301, 302(a), and 303, and
Section 553(b)(B) of the Administrative Procedure Act, 5 U.S.C. § 553(b)(B), this NOTICE OF
PROPOSED RULEMAKING AND ORDER is hereby ADOPTED and the Commission’s rules ARE
AMENDED as set forth in Appendix F.
182.
IT IS ALSO ORDERED that the Commission’s Consumer and Governmental Affairs
Bureau, Reference Information Center, SHALL SEND a copy of this NOTICE OF PROPOSED
RULEMAKING AND ORDER, including the Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis, to the Chief
Counsel for Advocacy of the Small Business Administration.
183.
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the rule amendments adopted herein SHALL BE
EFFECTIVE 30 days after publication of a summary of the Order in the Federal Register.
184.
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that the Commission SHALL SEND a copy of this Order in
a report to be sent to Congress and the General Accounting Office pursuant to the Congressional Review
Act, see 5 U.S.C. § 801(a)(1)(A).
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
Marlene H. Dortch
Secretary
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APPENDIX A

Glossary of Frequently Used Radiocommunication Service Terms

Term

Abbreviation

Defined at Note:

I. Space Radiocommunication Services

-
-
Earth exploration-satellite service
EESS
117
· meteorological-satellite service
MetSat
182
space research service
SRS
117

II. Terrestrial Radiocommunication Services

-
-
fixed service
FS
33
mobile service
MS
73
· aeronautical mobile service
AMS
62
Ø aeronautical mobile route (R) service
AM(R)S
62
Ø aeronautical mobile service (telemetry)
AMT
125
or aeronautical mobile telemetry
· land mobile service
LMS
78
· maritime mobile service
MMS
33
· mobile except aeronautical mobile service (consists MS (except AMS)
-
of the LMS and the MMS only)
radiodetermination service
RDS
47
· radiolocation service
RLS
47
· radionavigation service
RNS
50
Ø aeronautical radionavigation service
ARNS
59
Ø maritime radionavigation service
MRNS
155
67

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FCC 12-140

APPENDIX B

New and Renumbered Domestic Footnotes

Table 1: Footnotes Proposed to be Added or Renumbered in the Notice

New
Action*
Issue/Reason for Action
Para.(s)
US52
US77,
Combine the text of US77 and US106, make a frequency available for SAR
36
US106
operations, re-insert the non-Federal allocation for VHF channels 75 and 76,
and make those navigation frequencies available for primary Federal use
US79
US37,
Revise US37 and US398 (remove Little LEO exception); combine the text of
55
US398
these footnotes into a single footnote
US85
US343
Remove the 108-117.975 MHz band from US343
29
US100
US339
Delete non-Federal AMT use of the 2310-2320 MHz band and delete two
56
unused two frequencies that are available for non-Federal use
US111
NTIA
List 52 flight test areas where AMT would be conducted
64
US113
US203
Update US203 per CORF’s comments in VMES proceeding
60
US139
NG144
Simplify, update, and reclassify as a U.S. footnote
96
US145
NTIA
Mandatory unwanted emission limits for NGSO ISS satellites transmitting in
115
the 22.55-23.55 GHz band
US156
NTIA
Mandatory unwanted emission limits for earth stations transmitting in the
118
49.7-50.2 and 50.4-50.9 GHz bands
US157
NTIA
Mandatory unwanted emission limit for fixed stations transmitting in the
127
51.4-52.6 GHz band
US161
US388
Update RAS stations observing in the 80/90 GHz bands
106
US197A FCC
Require that AM(R)S use of the band 108-117.975 MHz not constrain the use
106
of the FM radio band
US228D US228
Remove expired grandfathering paragraph (c) from US228
41
US343
US78
Change “telemetry” to “telemetering” and add “on a co-equal basis”
69
US475
US66
Renumber US66 as US475 in order to simplify the U.S. Table
87
US476A
NTIA
Federal active sensors in the 9300-9500 MHz band must not cause harmful
85, 86
interference to radionavigation or Federal radiolocation
US482
US265
Restrict use of FS in the 10.6-10.68 GHz band to point-to-to-point applications, 147
restrict the maximum power delivered to the antenna to -3 dBW, and urge FS
station licensees to comply with WRC-07’s non-mandatory transmitter power
and antenna elevation angel limits and employ ATPC
US532
US263
Remove the 36-37 GHz band from US263 and renumber based on RR 5.532
155
US550A NTIA
Combine FS and MS sharing requirements into a single footnote
NG22
NG117
Correct two grammatical and/or typographical errors
38
NG35
NG120
Update text to reflect MAS bands specified in Section 101.101
44
NG60
NTIA
Urge fixed station licensees to use ATPC and to limit elevation angle
125
NG338A NTIA
Encourage Part 27 and 90 licensees in the 1390-1395 MHz and 1427-1435
133
MHz bands to take all reasonable steps to ensure that their stations’ unwanted
emission power does not exceed WRC-07’s non-mandatory level
*In the column titled Action, a Commission proposal to add a new footnote is denoted by FCC; a Federal
Recommendation to add a new footnote is denoted by NTIA; and a current footnote number is shown for
footnotes that are being proposed for re-numbering.
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FCC 12-140

Table 2: Footnotes Renumbered in the Order

New
Existing
Issue/Reason for Action
Para.(s)
US83
US361
Correct the name of a grandfathered site and remove a site
163
US97
US338
Add missing reference to the footnote to the 2310-2320 MHz band
166
US109
US348
Remove the Pascagoula, Mississippi site from the U.S. footnote
167
US128
US58
Add missing amateur-satellite service allocation to list of permitted services
168
US130
US277
Update cross reference from US355 to US131
168
US131
US355
Correct coordinates for Arecibo Observatory, correct the elevation for nearly
all of the observatories, and add missing references to Table
US288
RR 5.288 List four narrowband frequencies
162
NG32
NG12
Reflect channeling plan used by general aviation air-ground service
160
NG43
NG168
Make minor grammatical changes to NG168
164
NG50
NG42;
Simply the non-Federal Table by combining the text of NG42 and NG134
168
NG134
69

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APPENDIX C

Land Mobile Operations in the 156.4875-156.5625 MHz Band

The 20 call signs authorizing stations in the land mobile service are licensed in the following FCC Radio
Services: 17 call signs in the Conventional Public Safety Pool (PW), 2 call signs in the Conventional
Industrial/Business Pool (IG), and 1 call sign in the Trunked Public Safety Pool (YW).

Table 1: Number of PW Units Authorized Per Frequency

Frequency

Mobile stations (MO)

Base stations (FB)

Call Sign

Licensee

156.51, 156.55
6000
15 (FBT)
KOG301
State of Arizona
156.51, 156.55
52
1
WNQB585
156.51, 156.55
-
1
WNQB588
156.51
40
1
WNQB589
156.51, 156.55
240
3 (FB2)
WNQB590
156.55
-
1
WPDF593
156.51, 156.55
100
-
WPLD236
156.51, 156.55
250
4
KNIG790
156.51, 156.55
180
3
WNQB578
156.51, 156.55
200
2
WNQB581
156.51, 156.55
250
3
WNQB586
156.51, 156.55
600
1
WNQB587
156.51, 156.55
500
3 (FB2)
WNQB591
156.55
20
1
WPKX854
156.51, 156.55
500
1, 3
WQF388
156.525
-
2
WNXH642
County of Los
Angeles, CA
156.51
50
-
WQBI666
City of La Mesa, CA

Table 2: Number of IG Units Authorized Per Frequency

Frequency

MO

Location

Call Sign

Licensee

156.525
570
Continental U.S.
KA90145
WesternGeco L.L.C.
154.6-160
3
3 km radius around
WPLT721
Boyd Wilson Property Mgmt Co
(20K0F3E)
PA coordinates
dba Village of Olde Hickory

Table 3: Number of YW Units Authorized Per Frequency

Frequency

Base Stations (FB8)

Location

Call Sign

Licensee

156.5
1
Butte, MT
WQKX733
County of Silverbow
156.55
1
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FCC 12-140

APPENDIX D

Proposed Rules

For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Federal Communications Commission proposes to amend
47 C.F.R. parts 1, 2, 74, 78, 87, 90, and 97 as follows:

PART 1 – PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE

1. The authority citation for part 1 continues to read as follows:
AUTHORITY: 15 U.S.C. 79 et seq.; 47 U.S.C. 151, 154(i), 154(j), 155, 157, 225, 303(r), and 309.
2. Section 1.924 is amended by revising paragraphs (e) and (f) to read as follows:
§ 1.924 Quiet zones.
* * * * *
(e) 420-450 MHz band. Applicants for pulse-ranging radiolocation systems operating in the 420-450
MHz band along the shoreline of the conterminous United States and Alaska, and for spread spectrum
radiolocation systems operating in the 420-435 MHz sub-band within the conterminous United States and
Alaska, should not expect to be accommodated if their area of service is within:
(1) Arizona, Florida, or New Mexico;
(2) Those portions of California and Nevada that are south of latitude 37° 10' N;
(3) That portion of Texas that is west of longitude 104° W; or
(4) The following circular areas:
(i) 322 kilometers (km) of 30° 30' N, 86° 30' W
(ii) 322 km of 28° 21' N, 80° 43' W
(iii) 322 km of 34° 09' N, 119° 11' W
(iv) 240 km of 39° 08' N, 121° 26' W
(v) 200 km of 31° 25' N, 100° 24' W
(vi) 200 km of 32° 38' N, 83° 35' W
(vii) 160 km of 64° 17' N, 149° 10' W
(viii) 160 km of 48° 43' N, 97° 54' W
(ix) 160 km of 41° 45' N, 70° 32' W.
(f) 17.7-19.7 GHz band. The following exclusion areas and coordination areas are established to
minimize or avoid harmful interference to Federal Government earth stations receiving in the 17.7-19.7
GHz band:
(1) No application seeking authority for fixed stations, under parts 74, 78, or 101 of this chapter,
supporting the operations of Multichannel Video Programming Distributors (MVPD) in the 17.7-17.8
GHz band or to operate in the 17.8-19.7 GHz band for any service will be accepted for filing if the
proposed station is located within 20 km (or within 55 km if the modification application is for an outdoor
low power operation pursuant to §101.147(r)(14) of this chapter) of Denver, CO (39° 43' N, 104° 46' W)
or Washington, DC (38° 48' N, 76° 52' W).
(2) Any application for a new station license to provide MVPD operations in the 17.7-17.8 GHz band
or to operate in the 17.8-19.7 GHz band for any service, or for modification of an existing station license
in these bands which would change the frequency, power, emission, modulation, polarization, antenna
height or directivity, or location of such a station, must be coordinated with the Federal Government by
the Commission before an authorization will be issued, if the station or proposed station is located in
whole or in part within any of the following areas:
(i) Denver, CO area:
(A) Between latitudes 41° 30' N and 38° 30' N and between longitudes 103° 10' W and 106° 30' W.
(B) Between latitudes 38° 30' N and 37° 30' N and between longitudes 105° 00' W and 105° 50' W.
(C) Between latitudes 40° 08' N and 39° 56' N and between longitudes 107° 00' W and 107° 15' W.
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FCC 12-140

(ii) Washington, DC area:
(A) Between latitudes 38° 40' N and 38° 10' N and between longitudes 78° 50' W and 79° 20' W.
(B) Within 178 km of 38° 48' N, 76°52' W.
(iii) San Miguel, CA area:
(A) Between latitudes 34° 39' N and 34° 00' N and between longitudes 118° 52' W and 119° 24' W.
(B) Within 200 km of 35° 44' N, 120° 45' W.
(iv) Guam area: Within 100 km of 13° 35' N, 144° 51' E.
NOTE TO § 1.924(E): The coordinates cited in this section are specified in terms of the “North
American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83).”
* * * * *

PART 2 – FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS;

GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS

3. The authority citation for part 2 continues to read as follows:
AUTHORITY: 47 U.S.C. 154, 302a, 303, and 336, unless otherwise noted.
4. Section 2.1 is amended by revising the definition of the following terms in paragraph (c) to
read as follows:
§ 2.1 Terms and definitions.
* * * * *
(c) * * *
Earth Exploration-Satellite Service (EESS). A radiocommunication service between earth stations
and one or more space stations, which may include links between space stations, in which:
(1) information relating to the characteristics of the Earth and its natural phenomena, including data
relating to the state of the environment, is obtained from active sensors or passive sensors on Earth
satellites; (2) similar information is collected from airborne or Earth-based platforms; (3) such
information may be distributed to earth stations within the system concerned; and (4) platform
interrogation may be included. This service may also include feeder links necessary for its operation.
(RR) (FCC)
* * * * *
Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power (e.i.r.p. or EIRP). The product of the power supplied to the
antenna and the antenna gain in a given direction relative to an isotropic antenna (absolute or isotropic
gain). (RR) (FCC)
* * * * *
5. Section 2.100 is amended to read as follows:
§ 2.100 International regulations in force.
The ITU Radio Regulations, Edition of 2008, have been incorporated to the extent practicable in
Subparts A and B of this part.
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6. Section 2.106, the Table of Frequency Allocations, is amended as follows:
a. Pages 5, 20, 22-24, 30-33, 37, 40-41, 46-47, 49, 51-52, 55-56, 58-60, and 62 are revised.
b. In the list of United States (US) Footnotes, footnotes US52, US79, US85, US100, US111, US113,
US139, US145, US156, US157, US161, US197A, US227, US228D, US338A, US475, US476A, US482,
US532, and US550A are added; footnotes US74, US334, US343, US401, and US519 are revised; and
footnotes US37, US48, US51, US66, US77, US78, US106, US203, US226, US228, US263, US265, US290,
US339, US368, US388, US398, US400, US444, and US444A are removed.
c. In the list of non-Federal Government (NG) Footnotes, footnotes NG22, NG35, NG60, and
NG338A are added; and footnotes NG117, NG120, and NG144 are removed.
§ 2.106 Table of Frequency Allocations.
The revisions and additions read as follows:
* * * * *
73

Table of Frequency Allocations
1800-3025 kHz (MF/HF)
Page 5
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
1800-1810
1800-1850
1800-2000
1800-2000
1800-2000
RADIOLOCATION
AMATEUR
AMATEUR
AMATEUR
Amateur Radio (97)
FIXED
5.93
MOBILE except aeronautical
1810-1850
mobile
AMATEUR
RADIONAVIGATION
Radiolocation
5.98 5.99 5.100 5.101
1850-2000
1850-2000
FIXED
AMATEUR
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
RADIOLOCATION
RADIONAVIGATION
5.92 5.96 5.103
5.102
5.97
2000-2025
2000-2065
2000-2065
2000-2065
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
MARITIME MOBILE
Maritime (80)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile (R) MOBILE
MOBILE
Private Land Mobile (90)
5.92 5.103
2025-2045
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile (R)
Meteorological aids 5.104
5.92 5.103
2045-2160
US340
US340 NG7
FIXED
2065-2107
2065-2107
MARITIME MOBILE
MARITIME MOBILE 5.105
MARITIME MOBILE 5.105
Maritime (80)
LAND MOBILE
5.106
US296 US340
5.92
2107-2170
2107-2170
2107-2170
2160-2170
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
Maritime (80)
RADIOLOCATION
MOBILE
MOBILE
MOBILE except aeronautical
Private Land Mobile (90)
mobile
5.93 5.107
US340
US340 NG7
2170-2173.5
2170-2173.5
2170-2173.5
MARITIME MOBILE
MARITIME MOBILE (telephony)
MARITIME MOBILE
Maritime (80)
US340
US340
74

75.4-76
75.4-87
75.4-88
75.4-76
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
Public Mobile (22)
MOBILE
MOBILE
MOBILE
Aviation (87)
Private Land Mobile (90)
NG3 NG49 NG56
Personal Radio (95)
76-88
5.182 5.183 5.188
76-88
BROADCASTING
87-100
BROADCASTING
Broadcast Radio (TV)(73)
Fixed
FIXED
LPTV, TV Translator/
5.175 5.179 5.187
Mobile
Booster (74G)
MOBILE
5.185
BROADCASTING
NG5 NG14 NG115 NG149
Low Power Auxiliary (74H)
87.5-100
BROADCASTING
88-100
88-108
88-108
BROADCASTING
BROADCASTING NG2
Broadcast Radio (FM)(73)
5.190
FM Translator/Booster (74L)
100-108
BROADCASTING
5.192 5.194
US93
US93 NG5
108-117.975
108-117.975
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
Aviation (87)
5.197 5.197A
US197A US93
117.975-137
117.975-121.9375
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE (R)
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE (R)
5.111 5.200 US26 US28 US36
121.9375-123.0875
121.9375-123.0875
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE
US30 US31 US33 US80 US102
US30 US31 US33 US80 US102
US213
US213
123.0875-123.5875
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE
5.200 US32 US33 US112
123.5875-128.8125
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE (R)
US26 US36
128.8125-132.0125
128.8125-132.0125
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE (R)
132.0125-136
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE (R)
US26
136-137
136-137
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE (R)
5.111 5.200 5.201 5.202
US244
US244
Page 20
75

144-146
144-148
144-146
AMATEUR
AMATEUR
Amateur Radio (97)
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
5.216
146-148
146-148
146-148
146-148
FIXED
AMATEUR
AMATEUR
AMATEUR
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile (R)
FIXED
MOBILE
5.217
5.217
148-149.9
148-149.9
148-149.9
148-149.9
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE-SATELLITE
Satellite Communications (25)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile (R) MOBILE
MOBILE
(Earth-to-space) US320
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.209
MOBILE-SATELLITE
US323 US325
5.209
(Earth-to-space) US319
US320 US323 US325
5.218 5.219 5.221
5.218 5.219 5.221
5.218 5.219 G30
5.218 5.219 US319
149.9-150.05
149.9-150.05
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.209 5.224A
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) US319 US320
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE 5.224B
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE
5.220 5.222 5.223
5.223
150.05-153
150.05-156.4875
150.05-150.8
150.05-150.8
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE
MOBILE
RADIO ASTRONOMY
US73 G30
US73
150.8-152.855
150.8-152.855
FIXED
Public Mobile (22)
LAND MOBILE NG4 NG51
Private Land Mobile (90)
NG112
Personal Radio (95)
US73
US73 NG124
5.149
152.855-156.2475
152.855-154
153-154
LAND MOBILE NG4
Remote Pickup (74D)
FIXED
Private Land Mobile (90)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile (R)
Meteorological aids
NG124
154-156.4875
154-156.2475
FIXED
FIXED
Maritime (80)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile (R)
LAND MOBILE NG112
Private Land Mobile (90)
5.226 NG22 NG124 NG148
Personal Radio (95)
156.2475-156.5125
156.2475-156.5125
5.226
5.225 5.226
MARITIME MOBILE NG22
Maritime (80)
156.4875-156.5625
5.226 US52 US227 US266
Aviation (87)
MARITIME MOBILE (distress and calling via DSC)
5.226 US52 US227 US266
NG124
156.5125-156.5375
MARITIME MOBILE (distress, urgency, safety and calling via DSC)
5.111 5.226 US266
5.111 5.226 5.227
156.5375-156.7625
156.5375-156.7625
156.5625-156.7625
156.5625-156.7625
MARITIME MOBILE
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile (R) MOBILE
5.226
5.225 5.226
5.226 US52 US227 US266
5.226 US52 US227 US266
Page 22
76

Table of Frequency Allocations 156.7625-267 MHz (VHF)
Page 23
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
156.7625-156.8375
156.7625-156.8375
MARITIME MOBILE (distress and calling)
MARITIME MOBILE (distress, urgency, safety and calling)
Maritime (80)
Aviation (87)
5.111 5.226
5.111 5.226 US52 US266
156.8375-174
156.8375-174
156.8375-157.0375
156.8375-157.0375
FIXED
FIXED
MARITIME MOBILE
MOBILE except aeronautical
MOBILE
mobile
5.226 US52 US266
5.226 US52 US266
157.0375-157.1875
157.0375-157.1875
MARITIME MOBILE US214
Maritime (80)
5.226 US266 G109
5.226 US214 US266
157.1875-161.575
157.1875-157.45
Maritime (80)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile US266
Aviation (87)
5.226 NG111
Private Land Mobile (90)
157.45-161.575
Public Mobile (22)
FIXED
Remote Pickup (74D)
LAND MOBILE NG28 NG111 NG112
Maritime (80)
5.226 NG6 NG70 NG124 NG148 NG155 Private Land Mobile (90)
161.575-161.625
161.575-161.625
MARITIME MOBILE
Public Mobile (22)
Maritime (80)
5.226 US52
5.226 US52 NG6 NG17
161.625-161.9625
161.625-161.775
Public Mobile (22)
LAND MOBILE NG6
Remote Pickup (74D)
Low Power Auxiliary (74H)
5.226
161.775-161.9625
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile US266
Maritime (80)
NG6
Private Land Mobile (90)
US266
5.226
161.9625-161.9875
MARITIME MOBILE (AIS)
Maritime (80)
5.227A US228D
161.9875-162.0125
161.9875-162.0125
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.226
162.0125-162.0375
MARITIME MOBILE (AIS)
5.227A US228D
162.0375-173.2
162.0375-173.2
FIXED
Remote Pickup (74D)
MOBILE
Private Land Mobile (90)
US8 US11 US13 US73 US300
US312 G5
US8 US11 US13 US73 US300 US312
77

173.2-173.4
173.2-173.4
FIXED
Private Land Mobile (90)
Land mobile
173.4-174
173.4-174
FIXED
MOBILE
5.226 5.227A 5.229
5.226 5.227A 5.230 5.231 5.232
G5
174-223
174-216
174-223
174-216
174-216
BROADCASTING
BROADCASTING
FIXED
BROADCASTING
Broadcast Radio (TV)(73)
Fixed
MOBILE
LPTV, TV Translator/Booster
Mobile
BROADCASTING
(74G)
Low Power Auxiliary (74H)
5.234
NG5 NG14 NG115 NG149
216-220
216-217
216-219
FIXED
Fixed
FIXED
Maritime (80)
MARITIME MOBILE
Land mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Private Land Mobile (90)
Radiolocation 5.241
Personal Radio (95)
US210 US241 G2
217-220
US210 US241 NG173
Fixed
219-220
Mobile
FIXED
Maritime (80)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Private Land Mobile (90)
Amateur NG152
Amateur Radio (97)
5.242
US210 US241
US210 US241 NG173
220-225
220-222
AMATEUR
FIXED
Private Land Mobile (90)
FIXED
LAND MOBILE
MOBILE
US241 US242
Radiolocation 5.241
5.235 5.237 5.243
5.233 5.238 5.240 5.245
222-225
222-225
223-230
223-230
AMATEUR
Amateur Radio (97)
BROADCASTING
FIXED
Fixed
MOBILE
Mobile
BROADCASTING
225-235
AERONAUTICAL
225-235
225-235
RADIONAVIGATION
FIXED
FIXED
Radiolocation
MOBILE
MOBILE
5.243 5.246 5.247
5.250
230-235
230-235
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
AERONAUTICAL
RADIONAVIGATION
5.247 5.251 5.252
5.250
G27
235-267
235-267
235-267
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
5.111 5.252 5.254 5.256 5.256A
5.111 5.256 G27 G100
5.111 5.256
Page 24
78

890-942
890-902
890-942
890-902
US116 US268
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
894-896
MOBILE except aeronautical
MOBILE except aeronautical
MOBILE 5.317A
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE
Public Mobile (22)
mobile 5.317A
mobile 5.317A
BROADCASTING
US116 US268
BROADCASTING 5.322
Radiolocation
Radiolocation
896-901
Radiolocation
FIXED
Private Land Mobile (90)
LAND MOBILE
US116 US268
901-902
FIXED
Personal Communications (24)
MOBILE
5.318 5.325
US116 US268 G2
US116 US268
902-928
902-928
902-928
FIXED
RADIOLOCATION G59
ISM Equipment (18)
Amateur
Private Land Mobile (90)
Mobile except aeronautical
Amateur Radio (97)
mobile 5.325A
Radiolocation
5.150 US218 US267 US275
5.150 5.325 5.326
G11
5.150 US218 US267 US275
928-942
928-932
928-929
Public Mobile (22)
FIXED
FIXED
Private Land Mobile (90)
MOBILE except aeronautical
US116 US268 NG35
Fixed Microwave (101)
mobile 5.317A
929-930
Radiolocation
FIXED
Private Land Mobile (90)
LAND MOBILE
US116 US268
930-931
FIXED
Personal Communications (24)
MOBILE
US116 US268
931-932
FIXED
Public Mobile (22)
LAND MOBILE
US116 US268 G2
US116 US268
932-935
932-935
FIXED
FIXED
Public Mobile (22)
US268 G2
US268 NG35
Fixed Microwave (101)
935-941
935-940
FIXED
Private Land Mobile (90)
LAND MOBILE
US116 US268
940-941
FIXED
Personal Communications (24)
MOBILE
US116 US268 G2
US116 US268
Page 30
5.323
5.325
5.327
79

Table of Frequency Allocations 941-1525 MHz (UHF)
Page 31
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
(See previous page)
(See previous page)
(See previous page)
941-944
941-944
FIXED
FIXED
Public Mobile (22)
942-960
942-960
942-960
Aural Broadcast Auxiliary (74E)
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical
MOBILE 5.317A
MOBILE 5.317A
US268 US301 G2
US268 US301 NG30 NG35
Fixed Microwave (101)
mobile 5.317A
BROADCASTING
944-960
944-960
BROADCASTING 5.322
FIXED
Public Mobile (22)
Aural Broadcast Auxiliary (74E)
Low Power Auxiliary (74H)
5.323
5.320
NG35
Fixed Microwave (101)
960-1164
960-1164
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE (R) 5.327A
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE (R) 5.327A
Aviation (87)
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.328
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.328
US224
1164-1215
1164-1215
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.328
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.328
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space) 5.328B
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space)
5.328A
5.328A US224
1215-1240
1215-1240
1215-1240
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
RADIOLOCATION
(active)
Space research (active)
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space) 5.328B 5.329 5.329A
RADIOLOCATION G56
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE
(space-to-Earth)(space-to-space) G132
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
5.330 5.331 5.332
5.332
1240-1300
1240-1300
1240-1300
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
Amateur Radio (97)
RADIOLOCATION
(active)
Amateur
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space) 5.328B 5.329 5.329A
RADIOLOCATION G56
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
Space research (active)
Amateur
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
5.282 5.330 5.331 5.332 5.335 5.335A
5.332 5.335
5.282
1300-1350
1300-1350
1300-1350
RADIOLOCATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
Aviation (87)
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.337
5.337
5.337
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
Radiolocation G2
5.149 5.337A
US342
US342
1350-1400
1350-1400
1350-1390
1350-1390
FIXED
RADIOLOCATION 5.338A
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION G2
5.334 5.339 US342 US385 G27 G114
5.334 5.339 US342 US385
80

1390-1395
1390-1395
FIXED
Wireless Communications (27)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.339 US79 US342 US385
5.339 US79 US342 US385 NG338A
1395-1400
LAND MOBILE (medical telemetry and medical telecommand)
Personal Radio (95)
5.149 5.338 5.338A 5.339
5.149 5.334 5.339
5.339 US79 US342 US385
1400-1427
1400-1427
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY US74
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.340 5.341
5.341 US246
1427-1429
1427-1429.5
1427-1429.5
SPACE OPERATION (Earth-to-space)
LAND MOBILE (medical telemetry
LAND MOBILE (telemetry and telecommand)
Private Land Mobile (90)
FIXED
and medical telecommand) US350
Fixed (telemetry)
Personal Radio (95)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.338A 5.341
1429-1452
1429-1452
5.341 US79
5.341 US79 US350
FIXED
FIXED
1429.5-1432
1429.5-1432
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile MOBILE 5.343
FIXED (telemetry and telecommand)
LAND MOBILE (telemetry and telecommand)
5.341 US79 US350
5.341 US79 US350
1432-1435
1432-1435
FIXED
Wireless Communications (27)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.341 US83
5.341 US83 NG338A
5.338A 5.341 5.342
5.338A 5.341
1435-1525
1452-1492
1452-1492
MOBILE (aeronautical telemetry) US338A
Aviation (87)
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile MOBILE 5.343
BROADCASTING 5.345
BROADCASTING 5.345
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE 5.208B 5.345
5.208B 5.345
5.341 5.342
5.341 5.344
5.341 US343
Page 32
81

Table of Frequency Allocations 1525-1670 MHz (UHF)
Page 33
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
1492-1518
1492-1518
1492-1518
(see previous page)
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE 5.343
MOBILE
5.341 5.342
5.341 5.344
5.341
1518-1525
1518-1525
1518-1525
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE 5.343
MOBILE
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
5.348 5.348A 5.348B 5.351A
5.348 5.348A 5.348B 5.351A
5.348 5.348A 5.348B 5.351A
5.341 5.342
5.341 5.344
5.341
1525-1530
1525-1530
1525-1530
1525-1535
SPACE OPERATION (space-to-Earth)
SPACE OPERATION (space-to-Earth)
SPACE OPERATION (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) US315 US380
Satellite Communications (25)
FIXED
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED
Maritime (80)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
5.208B 5.351A
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
5.208B 5.351A
Earth exploration-satellite
5.208B 5.351A
Earth exploration-satellite
Fixed
Earth exploration-satellite
Mobile except aeronautical mobile 5.349 Mobile 5.343
Mobile 5.349
5.341 5.342 5.350 5.351 5.352A
5.354
5.341 5.351 5.354
5.341 5.351 5.352A 5.354
1530-1535
1530-1535
SPACE OPERATION (space-to-Earth)
SPACE OPERATION (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.208B 5.351A 5.353A
5.208B 5.351A 5.353A
Earth exploration-satellite
Earth exploration-satellite
Fixed
Fixed
Mobile 5.343
Mobile except aeronautical mobile
5.341 5.342 5.351 5.354
5.341 5.351 5.354
5.341 5.351
1535-1559
1535-1559
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.208B 5.351A
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) US308 US309
Satellite Communications (25)
US315 US380
Maritime (80)
Aviation (87)
5.341 5.351 5.353A 5.354 5.355 5.356 5.357 5.357A 5.359 5.362A
5.341 5.351 5.356
1559-1610
1559-1610
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
Aviation (87)
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space) 5.208B 5.328B 5.329A
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
(space-to-space)
5.341 5.362B 5.362C
5.341 US85 US208 US260
1610-1610.6
1610-1610.6
1610-1610.6
1610-1610.6
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) US319 US380
Satellite Communications (25)
5.351A
5.351A
5.351A
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION US260
Aviation (87)
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
RADIODETERMINATION-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
RADIODETERMINATION-SATELLITE
Radiodetermination-satellite
(Earth-to-space)
(Earth-to-space)
5.341 5.355 5.359 5.364 5.366
5.341 5.364 5.366 5.367 5.368
5.341 5.355 5.359 5.364 5.366
5.367 5.368 5.369 5.371 5.372
5.370 5.372
5.367 5.368 5.369 5.372
5.341 5.364 5.366 5.367 5.368 5.372 US208
82

Table of Frequency Allocations
2200-2655 MHz (UHF)
Page 37
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
2200-2290
2200-2290
2200-2290
SPACE OPERATION (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space)
SPACE OPERATION (space-to-Earth)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space)
(space-to-space)
FIXED
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
MOBILE 5.391
(space-to-Earth) (space-to-space)
SPACE RESEARCH (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space)
FIXED (line-of-sight only)
MOBILE (line-of-sight only including
aeronautical telemetry, but excluding
flight testing of manned aircraft) 5.391
SPACE RESEARCH (space-to-Earth)
(space-to-space)
5.392
5.392 US303
US303
2290-2300
2290-2300
2290-2300
FIXED
FIXED
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
(space-to-Earth)
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space) (space-to-Earth)
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space)
(space-to-Earth)
2300-2450
2300-2450
2300-2305
2300-2305
FIXED
FIXED
Amateur
Amateur Radio (97)
G122
MOBILE 5.384A
MOBILE 5.384A
2305-2310
2305-2310
Amateur
RADIOLOCATION
FIXED
Wireless
Radiolocation
Amateur
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Communications (27)
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur Radio (97)
Amateur
US97 G122
US97
2310-2320
2310-2320
Fixed
FIXED
Wireless
Mobile US100
MOBILE
Communications (27)
Radiolocation G2
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
RADIOLOCATION
US97 US327
5.396 US97 US100 US327
2320-2345
2320-2345
Fixed
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
Satellite
Radiolocation G2
Communications (25)
US327
5.396 US327
2345-2360
2345-2360
Fixed
FIXED
Wireless
Mobile US100
MOBILE US100
Communications (27)
Radiolocation G2
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
Aviation (87)
RADIOLOCATION
US327
5.396 US327
2360-2390
2360-2390
MOBILE US276
MOBILE US276
Aviation (87)
RADIOLOCATION G2 G120
Personal Radio (95)
Fixed

US101
US101
83

3300-3400
3300-3400
3300-3400
3300-3500
3300-3500
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION US108 G2
Amateur
Private Land Mobile (90)
Amateur
Amateur
Radiolocation US108
Amateur Radio (97)
Fixed
Mobile
5.149 5.429 5.430
5.149
5.149 5.429
3400-3600
3400-3500
3400-3500
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Mobile 5.430A
Amateur
Amateur
Radiolocation
Mobile 5.431A
Mobile 5.432B
Radiolocation 5.433
Radiolocation 5.433
5.282
5.282 5.432 5.432A
US342
5.282 US342
3500-3700
3500-3600
3500-3650
3500-3600
FIXED
FIXED
RADIOLOCATION G59
Radiolocation
Private Land Mobile (90)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
AERONAUTICAL
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
RADIONAVIGATION
Radiolocation 5.433
5.433A
(ground-based) G110
5.431
Radiolocation 5.433
3600-4200
3600-3700
3600-3650
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE
Satellite
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
(space-to-Earth) US245
Communications (25)
Mobile
US245
Radiolocation
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Private Land Mobile (90)
Radiolocation 5.433
3650-3700
3650-3700
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
NG169 NG185
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.435
US109 US349
US109 US349
3700-4200
3700-4200
3700-4200
FIXED
FIXED
Satellite
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Communications (25)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
NG180
Fixed Microwave (101)
4200-4400
4200-4400
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.438
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
Aviation (87)
5.439 5.440
5.440 US261
4400-4500
4400-4940
4400-4500
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE 5.440A
MOBILE
4500-4800
4500-4800
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.441
5.441 US245
MOBILE 5.440A
4800-4990
4800-4940
FIXED
US113 US245 US342
US113 US342
MOBILE 5.440A 5.442
Radio astronomy
4940-4990
4940-4990
FIXED
Public Safety Land Mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
(90Y)
5.149 5.339 5.443
5.339 US342 US385 G122
5.339 US342 US385
Page 40
84

Table of Frequency Allocations 4990-5925 MHz (SHF)
Page 41
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
4990-5000
4990-5000
FIXED
RADIO ASTRONOMY US74
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Space research (passive)
RADIO ASTRONOMY
Space research (passive)
5.149
US246
5000-5010
5000-5010
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION US260
Aviation (87)
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
5.367
5.367 US211
5010-5030
5010-5030
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION US260
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space) 5.328B 5.443B
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space) 5.443B
5.367
5.367 US211
5030-5091
5030-5091
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION US260
5.367 5.444
5.367 5.444 US211
5091-5150
5091-5150
5091-5150
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE 5.444B
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE 5.444B US111
AERONAUTICAL MOBILE 5.444B
Satellite Communica-
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
US111
tions (25)
US260
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
Aviation (87)
US260
5.367 5.444 5.444A
5.367 5.444 US211 US344
5.367 5.444 5.444A US211 US344
5150-5250
5150-5250
5150-5250
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
RF Devices (15)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.447A
US260
US260
Satellite Communica-
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile 5.446A 5.446B
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
tions (25)
5.447A US344
Aviation (87)
5.446 5.446C 5.447 5.447B 5.447C
US211 US307 US344
5.447C US211 US307
5250-5255
5250-5255
5250-5255
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
RF Devices (15)
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION G59
Radiolocation
Private Land Mobile (90)
SPACE RESEARCH 5.447D
SPACE RESEARCH (active) 5.447D
Space research
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile 5.446A 5.447F
5.447E 5.448 5.448A
5.448A
5255-5350
5255-5350
5255-5350
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION G59
Radiolocation
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
Space research (active)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile 5.446A 5.447F
5.447E 5.448 5.448A
5.448A
5.448A
5350-5460
5350-5460
5350-5460
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active) 5.448B
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
Aviation (87)
SPACE RESEARCH (active) 5.448C
5.448B
5.449
Private Land Mobile (90)
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.449
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
Earth exploration-satellite (active) 5.448B
RADIOLOCATION 5.448D
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.449 Space research (active)
RADIOLOCATION G56
Radiolocation
US390 G130
US390
85

8650-8750
8650-9000
8650-9000
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION G59
Radiolocation
Aviation (87)
Private Land Mobile (90)
5.468 5.469
8750-8850
RADIOLOCATION
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.470
5.471
8850-9000
RADIOLOCATION
MARITIME RADIONAVIGATION 5.472
5.473
US53
US53
9000-9200
9000-9200
9000-9200
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.337
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.337
AERONAUTICAL
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION G2
RADIONAVIGATION 5.337
Radiolocation
5.471 5.473A
5.473A G19
9200-9300
9200-9300
9200-9300
RADIOLOCATION
MARITIME RADIONAVIGATION 5.472
MARITIME RADIONAVIGATION
Maritime (80)
MARITIME RADIONAVIGATION 5.472
Radiolocation US110 G59
5.472
Private Land Mobile (90)
Radiolocation US110
5.473 5.474
5.474
5.474
9300-9500
9300-9500
9300-9500
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
RADIONAVIGATION US475
Maritime (80)
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
Meteorological aids
Aviation (87)
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION G56
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
Private Land Mobile (90)
RADIONAVIGATION 5.475
RADIONAVIGATION US475
Space research (active)
Meteorological aids
Radiolocation
5.427 5.474 5.475A 5.475B 5.476A
5.427 5.474 5.475A 5.475B US67 US71 US476A
5.427 5.474 US67 US71 US476A
9500-9800
9500-9800
9500-9900
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
Private Land Mobile (90)
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
Space research (active)
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Radiolocation
RADIONAVIGATION
5.476A
9800-9900
9800-9900
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
Space research (active)
Space research (active)
Fixed
5.477 5.478 5.478A 5.478B
9900-10000
9900-10000
9900-10000
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Radiolocation
Fixed
5.477 5.478 5.479
5.479
5.479
Page 46
86

Table of Frequency Allocations
10-14 GHz (SHF)
Page 47
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
10-10.45
10-10.45
10-10.45
10-10.5
10-10.45
FIXED
RADIOLOCATION
FIXED
RADIOLOCATION US108 G32
Amateur
Private Land Mobile (90)
MOBILE
Amateur
MOBILE
Radiolocation US108
Amateur Radio (97)
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
Amateur
5.479
5.479 5.480
5.479
5.479 US128 NG50
10.45-10.5
10.45-10.5
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
Amateur
Amateur-satellite
Amateur-satellite
Radiolocation US108
5.481
5.479 US128
US128 NG50
10.5-10.55
10.5-10.55
10.5-10.55
FIXED
FIXED
RADIOLOCATION US59
Private Land Mobile (90)
MOBILE
MOBILE
Radiolocation
RADIOLOCATION
10.55-10.6
10.55-10.6
10.55-10.6
FIXED
FIXED
Fixed Microwave (101)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Radiolocation
10.6-10.68
10.6-10.68
10.6-10.68
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-
EARTH EXPLORATION-
FIXED
SATELLITE (passive)
SATELLITE (passive)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
FIXED US482
RADIO ASTRONOMY
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
Radiolocation
5.149 5.482 5.482A
US130 US131 US482
US130 US131
10.68-10.7
10.68-10.7
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY US74
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.340 5.483
US131 US246
10.7-11.7
10.7-11.7
10.7-11.7
10.7-11.7
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
Satellite Communications (25)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.441 5.484A
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
Fixed Microwave (101)
5.441 5.484A (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Earth) 5.441 US131 US211
5.484
NG104 NG182 NG186
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
US131 US211
11.7-12.5
11.7-12.1
11.7-12.2
11.7-12.2
11.7-12.2
FIXED
FIXED 5.486
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
Satellite Communications (25)
MOBILE except aeronautical
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Earth) 5.485 5.488 NG143
mobile
5.484A 5.488
BROADCASTING
NG183 NG187
BROADCASTING
Mobile except aeronautical mobile
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE 5.492
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
5.485
5.492
12.1-12.2
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
5.484A 5.488
5.485 5.489
5.487 5.487A
NG184
87

Table of Frequency Allocations
14-17.7 GHz (SHF)
Page 49
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
14-14.25
14-14.2
14-14.2
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.457A 5.457B 5.484A 5.506 5.506B
Space research
FIXED-SATELLITE
Satellite Communications
RADIONAVIGATION 5.504
(Earth-to-space) NG183 NG187
(25)
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space) 5.504B 5.504C 5.506A
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space)
Space research
Space research
5.504A 5.505
14.2-14.4
14.2-14.47
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
14.25-14.3
NG183 NG187
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.457A 5.457B 5.484A 5.506 5.506B
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space)
RADIONAVIGATION 5.504
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space) 5.504B 5.506A 5.508A
Space research
5.504A 5.505 5.508
14.3-14.4
14.3-14.4
14.3-14.4
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
5.457A 5.484A 5.506 5.506B
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
5.457A 5.457B 5.484A 5.506 5.506B
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space)
5.457A 5.484A 5.506 5.506B
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.506A
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space) 5.504B
Radionavigation-satellite
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space)
5.506A 5.509A
5.504B 5.506A 5.509A
Radionavigation-satellite
Radionavigation-satellite
5.504A
5.504A
5.504A
14.4-14.47
14.4-14.47
FIXED
Fixed
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.457A 5.457B 5.484A 5.506 5.506B
Mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space) 5.504B 5.506A 5.509A
Space research (space-to-Earth)
5.504A
NG184
14.47-14.5
14.47-14.5
14.47-14.5
FIXED
Fixed
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.457A 5.457B 5.484A 5.506 5.506B
Mobile
NG183 NG187
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space)
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space) 5.504B 5.506A 5.509A
Radio astronomy
5.149 5.504A
US113 US342
US113 US342
14.5-14.8
14.5-14.7145
14.5-14.8
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.510
Mobile
MOBILE
Space research
Space research
14.7145-14.8
MOBILE
Fixed
Space research
14.8-15.35
14.8-15.1365
14.8-15.1365
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
SPACE RESEARCH
Space research
Fixed
US310
US310
88

Table of Frequency Allocations 17.7-23.6 GHz (SHF)
Page 51
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
17.7-18.1
17.7-17.8
17.7-18.1
17.7-17.8
17.7-17.8
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
Satellite
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
Communications (25)
5.484A (Earth-to-space) 5.516
5.517 (Earth-to-space) 5.516
5.484A (Earth-to-space) 5.516
US271
TV Broadcast Auxiliary
MOBILE
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
MOBILE
(74F)
Mobile
Cable TV Relay (78)
Fixed Microwave (101)
5.515
US401 G117
US401
17.8-18.1
17.8-18.3
17.8-18.3
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
FIXED
TV Broadcast Auxiliary
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Earth) US334 G117
(74F)
5.484A (Earth-to-space) 5.516
Cable TV Relay (78)
MOBILE
Fixed Microwave (101)
5.519
18.1-18.4
US519
US334 US519
FIXED
18.3-18.6
18.3-18.6
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.484A 5.516B (Earth-to-space) 5.520
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Satellite
MOBILE
Earth) US334 G117
NG164
Communications (25)
5.519 5.521
18.4-18.6
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.484A 5.516B
MOBILE
US139
US334 US139
18.6-18.8
18.6-18.8
18.6-18.8
18.6-18.8
18.6-18.8
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATEL-
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE EARTH EXPLORATION-
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
LITE (passive)
(passive)
(passive)
SATELLITE (passive)
(passive)
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Earth) US334 US255 G117
US255 NG164
5.522B
5.516B 5.522B
5.522B
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Space research (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
Space research (passive)
5.522A 5.522C
5.522A
5.522A
US139 US254
US139 US254 US334
18.8-19.3
18.8-20.2
18.8-19.3
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.516B 5.523A
Earth) US334 G117
NG165
MOBILE
US139 US334
19.3-19.7
19.3-19.7
Satellite
FIXED
FIXED
Communications (25)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (Earth-to-space) 5.523B 5.523C 5.523D 5.523E
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
TV Broadc’t Auxiliary (74F)
MOBILE
NG166
Cable TV Relay (78)
Fixed Microwave (101)
US334
19.7-20.1
19.7-20.1
19.7-20.1
19.7-20.2
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Satellite
5.484A 5.516B
5.484A 5.516B
5.484A 5.516B
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Communications (25)
Mobile-satellite (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Mobile-satellite (space-to-Earth)
5.524
5.524 5.525 5.526 5.527 5.528 5.529 5.524
89

20.1-20.2
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.484A 5.516B
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
5.525 5.526 5.527 5.528 5.529
5.524 5.525 5.526 5.527 5.528
US139
US334
20.2-21.2
20.2-21.2
20.2-21.2
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE
Standard frequency and time
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
(space-to-Earth)
Signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
Standard frequency and time signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE-SATELLITE
(space-to-Earth)
Standard frequency and time
signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
5.524
G117
21.2-21.4
21.2-21.4
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
Fixed Microwave (101)
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
US532
21.4-22
21.4-22
21.4-22
21.4-22
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
MOBILE
MOBILE
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
5.208B 5.530
5.208B 5.530
5.531
22-22.21
22-22.21
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.149
US342
22.21-22.5
22.21-22.5
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.149 5.532
US342 US532
22.5-22.55
22.5-22.55
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
US211
22.55-23.55
22.55-23.55
FIXED
FIXED
Satellite
INTER-SATELLITE 5.338A
INTER-SATELLITE US145 US278
Communications (25)
MOBILE
MOBILE
Fixed Microwave (101)
5.149
US342
23.55-23.6
23.55-23.6
FIXED
FIXED
Fixed Microwave (101)
MOBILE
MOBILE
Page 52
90

Table of Frequency Allocations 30-39.5 GHz (EHF)
Page 55
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
30-31
30-31
30-31
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.338A
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
Standard frequency and time
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
Standard frequency and time signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
Standard frequency and time
signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
5.542
G117
31-31.3
31-31.3
31-31.3
FIXED 5.338A 5.543A
Standard frequency and time
FIXED NG60
Fixed Microwave (101)
MOBILE
signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE
Standard frequency and time signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
Standard frequency and time
Space research 5.544 5.545
signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
5.149
US211 US342
US211 US342
31.3-31.5
31.3-31.8
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY US74
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.340
31.5-31.8
31.5-31.8
31.5-31.8
EARTH EXPLORATION-
EARTH EXPLORATION-
EARTH EXPLORATION-
SATELLITE (passive)
SATELLITE (passive)
SATELLITE (passive)
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
Fixed
Fixed
Mobile except aeronautical mobile
Mobile except aeronautical mobile
5.149 5.546
5.340
5.149
US246
31.8-32
31.8-32.3
31.8-32.3
FIXED 5.547A
RADIONAVIGATION US69
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space)
RADIONAVIGATION
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space)
(space-to-Earth) US262
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space) (space-to-Earth)
(space-to-Earth) US262
5.547 5.547B 5.548
32-32.3
FIXED 5.547A
RADIONAVIGATION
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space) (space-to-Earth)
5.547 5.547C 5.548
5.548 US211
5.548 US211
32.3-33
32.3-33
FIXED 5.547A
INTER-SATELLITE US278
Aviation (87)
INTER-SATELLITE
RADIONAVIGATION US69
RADIONAVIGATION
5.547 5.547D 5.548
5.548
33-33.4
33-33.4
FIXED 5.547A
RADIONAVIGATION US69
RADIONAVIGATION
5.547 5.547E
US360 G117
91

33.4-34.2
33.4-34.2
33.4-34.2
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Radiolocation
Private Land Mobile (90)
5.549
US360 G117
US360
34.2-34.7
34.2-34.7
34.2-34.7
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Radiolocation
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space) (Earth-to-space)
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space)
Space research (deep space)
(Earth-to-space) US262
(Earth-to-space) US262
5.549
US360 G34 G117
US360
34.7-35.2
34.7-35.5
34.7-35.5
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Radiolocation
Space research 5.550
5.549
35.2-35.5
METEOROLOGICAL AIDS
RADIOLOCATION
5.549
US360 G117
US360
35.5-36
35.5-36
35.5-36
METEOROLOGICAL AIDS
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
(active)
Radiolocation
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Space research (active)
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
5.549 5.549A
US360 G117
US360
36-37
36-37
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.149 5.550A
US263 US342 US550A
37-37.5
37-38
37-37.5
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
MOBILE
SPACE RESEARCH (space-to-Earth)
SPACE RESEARCH (space-to-Earth)
5.547
37.5-38
37.5-38.6
FIXED
FIXED
Satellite Communications (25)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE
MOBILE
SPACE RESEARCH (space-to-Earth)
Earth exploration-satellite (space-to-Earth)
5.547
38-39.5
38-38.6
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE
MOBILE
38.6-39.5
38.6-39.5
Earth exploration-satellite (space-to-Earth)
FIXED
Satellite Communications (25)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Fixed Microwave (101)
5.547
MOBILE NG175
Page 56
92

43.5-47
43.5-45.5
43.5-45.5
MOBILE 5.553
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE-SATELLITE
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
RADIONAVIGATION
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE
G117
45.5-46.9
MOBILE
RF Devices (15)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE
5.554
46.9-47
46.9-47
MOBILE
FIXED
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) MOBILE
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE
5.554
5.554
5.554
47-47.2
47-48.2
47-47.2
AMATEUR
AMATEUR
Amateur Radio (97)
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
AMATEUR-SATELLITE
47.2-47.5
47.2-48.2
FIXED
FIXED
Satellite Communications (25)

FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.552
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE
US297
MOBILE
5.552A
47.5-47.9
47.5-47.9
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.552
5.552 (space-to-Earth) 5.516B
MOBILE
5.554A
MOBILE
47.9-48.2
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.552
MOBILE
5.552A
48.2-48.54
48.2-50.2
48.2-50.2
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.338A 5.516B 5.552
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) US156 US297
5.552 (space-to-Earth) 5.516B
MOBILE
MOBILE US264
5.554A 5.555B
MOBILE
48.54-49.44
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
5.552
MOBILE
5.149 5.340 5.555
5.149 5.340 5.555
5.555 US342
Page 58
93

Table of Frequency Allocations
50.2-71 GHz (EHF)
Page 59
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
49.44-50.2
(See previous page)
(See previous page)
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
5.338A 5.552 (space-to-Earth)
5.516B 5.554A 5.555B
MOBILE
50.2-50.4
50.2-50.4
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.340
US246
50.4-51.4
50.4-51.4
50.4-51.4
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.338A
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE
US156
US156
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE
MOBILE
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
G117
51.4-52.6
51.4-52.6
FIXED 5.338A
FIXED US157
MOBILE
MOBILE
5.547 5.556
52.6-54.25
52.6-54.25
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.340 5.556
US246
54.25-55.78
54.25-55.78
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
Satellite Communications (25)
INTER-SATELLITE 5.556A
INTER-SATELLITE 5.556A
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.556B
55.78-56.9
55.78-56.9
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
FIXED 5.557A
FIXED US379
INTER-SATELLITE 5.556A
INTER-SATELLITE 5.556A
MOBILE 5.558
MOBILE 5.558
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.547 5.557
US532 US353
56.9-57
56.9-57
56.9-57
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
FIXED
(passive)
(passive)
INTER-SATELLITE 5.558A
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE 5.558
INTER-SATELLITE G128
MOBILE 5.558
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
MOBILE 5.558
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.547 5.557
US532
US532
94

57-58.2
57-58.2
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
RF Devices (15)
FIXED
FIXED
Satellite Communications (25)
INTER-SATELLITE 5.556A
INTER-SATELLITE 5.556A
MOBILE 5.558
MOBILE 5.558
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.547 5.557
US532
58.2-59
58.2-59
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
RF Devices (15)
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.547 5.556
US353 US354
59-59.3
59-59.3
59-59.3
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
FIXED
(passive)
(passive)
INTER-SATELLITE 5.556A
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE 5.558
INTER-SATELLITE 5.556A
MOBILE 5.558
RADIOLOCATION 5.559
MOBILE 5.558
RADIOLOCATION 5.559
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
RADIOLOCATION 5.559
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
US353
US353
59.3-64
59.3-64
59.3-64
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
RF Devices (15)
INTER-SATELLITE
INTER-SATELLITE
MOBILE 5.558
ISM Equipment (18)
MOBILE 5.558
MOBILE 5.558
RADIOLOCATION 5.559
RADIOLOCATION 5.559
RADIOLOCATION 5.559
5.138
5.138 US353
5.138 US353
64-65
64-65
64-65
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
INTER-SATELLITE
INTER-SATELLITE
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.547 5.556
65-66
65-66
65-66
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
Satellite Communications (25)
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
INTER-SATELLITE
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
INTER-SATELLITE
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
SPACE RESEARCH
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
SPACE RESEARCH
SPACE RESEARCH
5.547
66-71
66-71
66-71
INTER-SATELLITE
MOBILE 5.553 5.558
INTER-SATELLITE
MOBILE 5.553 5.558
MOBILE-SATELLITE
MOBILE 5.553 5.558
MOBILE-SATELLITE
RADIONAVIGATION
MOBILE-SATELLITE
RADIONAVIGATION
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE
RADIONAVIGATION
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE
5.554
5.554
5.554
Page 60
95

81-84
81-84
FIXED
FIXED
Fixed Microwave (101)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) US297
MOBILE
MOBILE
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY
Space research (space-to-Earth)
Space research (space-to-Earth)
5.149 5.561A
US161 US342 US389
84-86
84-86
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.561B
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE
MOBILE
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY
5.149
US161 US342 US389
86-92
86-92
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY US74
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.340
US246
92-94
92-94
FIXED
FIXED
RF Devices (15)
MOBILE
MOBILE
Fixed Microwave (101)
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
5.149
US152 US342
94-94.1
94-94.1
94-94.1
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (active)
EARTH EXPLORATION-
RADIOLOCATION
RF Devices (15)
RADIOLOCATION
SATELLITE (active)
Radio astronomy
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
RADIOLOCATION
Radio astronomy
SPACE RESEARCH (active)
Radio astronomy
5.562 5.562A
5.562 5.562A
5.562A
94.1-95
94.1-95
FIXED
FIXED
RF Devices (15)
MOBILE
MOBILE
Fixed Microwave (101)
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
5.149
US161 US342
95-100
95-100
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
RADIONAVIGATION
RADIONAVIGATION
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE
RADIONAVIGATION-SATELLITE
5.149 5.554
5.554 US342
Page 62
96

Federal Communications Commission

FCC 12-140

* * * * *

UNITED STATES (US) FOOTNOTES

* * * * *
US52 In the VHF maritime mobile band (156-162 MHz), the following provisions shall apply:
(a) Federal stations in the maritime mobile service may also be authorized as follows: (1) Vessel
traffic services under the control of the U.S. Coast Guard on a simplex basis by coast and ship stations on
the frequencies 156.250 MHz (Channel 05), 156.550 MHz (Channel 11), 156.600 MHz (Channel 12) and
156.700 MHz (Channel 14); (2) Inter-ship use of the frequency 156.300 MHz (Channel 06) on a simplex
basis; (3) Navigational bridge-to-bridge and navigational communications on a simplex basis by coast
and ship stations on the frequency 156.650 MHz (Channel 13) and on the Lower Mississippi River the
frequency 156.375 MHz (Channel 67); (4) Port operations use on a simplex basis by coast and ship
stations on the frequencies 156.600 MHz and 156.700 MHz; (5) Environmental communications on the
frequency 156.750 MHz (Channel 15) in accordance with the national plan; and (6) Duplex port
operations use of the frequencies 157.000 MHz for ship stations and 161.600 MHz for coast stations
(Channel 20).
(b) The frequency 156.300 MHz may also be used by Federal and non-Federal aircraft stations for
the purpose of search and rescue operations and other safety-related communications.
(c) The frequencies 156.775 MHz (Channel 75) and 156.825 MHz (Channel 76) are available on a
primary basis to Federal and non-Federal stations in the maritime mobile service for navigation-related
port operations or ship movement only, and all precautions must be taken to avoid harmful interference to
156.800 MHz (Channel 16).
* * * * *
US74 In the bands 25.55-25.67, 73-74.6, 406.1-410, 608-614, 1400-1427, 1660.5-1670, 2690-2700,
and 4990-5000 MHz, and in the bands 10.68-10.7, 15.35-15.4, 23.6-24.0, 31.3-31.5, 86-92, 100-102,
109.5-111.8, 114.25-116, 148.5-151.5, 164-167, 200-209, and 250-252 GHz, the radio astronomy service
shall be protected from unwanted emissions only to the extent that such radiation exceeds the level which
would be present if the offending station were operating in compliance with the technical standards or
criteria applicable to the service in which it operates. Radio astronomy observations in these bands are
performed at the locations listed in US385.
US79 In the bands 1390-1400 MHz and 1427-1432 MHz, the following provisions shall apply:
(a) Airborne and space-to-Earth operations are prohibited.
(b) Federal operations (except for devices authorized by the FCC for the Wireless Medical Telemetry
Service) are on a non-interference basis to non-Federal operations and shall not constrain implementation
of non-Federal operations.
* * * * *
US85 Differential-Global-Positioning-System (DGPS) Stations, limited to ground-based
transmitters, may be authorized on a primary basis in the band 1559-1610 MHz for the specific purpose
of transmitting DGPS information intended for aircraft navigation.
* * * * *
US100 The bands 2310-2320 and 2345-2360 MHz are also available for Federal aeronautical
telemetering and associated telecommand operations for flight testing of manned or unmanned aircraft,
missiles or major components thereof on a secondary basis to the Wireless Communications Service
(WCS). The band 2345-2360 MHz is also available to non-Federal applicants on a secondary basis to the
WCS for these same purposes. The following two frequencies are shared on a co-equal basis by Federal
stations for telemetering and associated telecommand operations of expendable and re-usable launch
vehicles whether or not such operations involve flight testing: 2312.5 and 2352.5 MHz. Other Federal
mobile telemetering uses may be provided on a non-interference basis to the above uses. The
broadcasting-satellite service (sound) during implementation should also take cognizance of the
97

Federal Communications Commission

FCC 12-140

expendable and reusable launch vehicle frequencies 2312.5 and 2352.5 MHz, to minimize the impact on
this mobile service use to the extent possible.
* * * * *
US111 In the band 5091-5150 MHz, aeronautical mobile telemetry operations for flight testing are
conducted at the following locations. Flight testing at additional locations may be authorized on a case-
by-case basis.
Location
Test Sites
Lat. (N)
Long. (W)
Gulf Area Ranges Complex
Eglin AFB, Tyndall AFB, FL; Gulfport ANG
30° 28'
86° 31'
(GARC)
Range, MS; Ft. Rucker, Redstone, NASA
Marshall Space Flight Center, AL
Utah Ranges Complex (URC)
Dugway PG; Utah Test & Training Range (Hill
40° 57'
113° 05'
AFB), UT
Western Ranges Complex
Pacific Missile Range; Vandenberg AFB, China
35° 29'
117° 16'
(WRC)
Lake NAWS, Pt. Mugu NAWS, Edwards AFB,
Thermal, Nellis AFB, Ft. Irwin, NASA Dryden
Flight Research Center, Victorville, CA
Southwest Ranges Complex
Ft. Huachuca, Tucson, Phoenix, Mesa, Yuma, AZ
31° 33'
110° 18'
(SRC)
Mid-Atlantic Ranges Complex
Patuxent River, Aberdeen PG, NASA Langley
38° 17'
76° 24'
(MARC)
Research Center, NASA Wallops Flight Facility,
MD
New Mexico Ranges Complex
White Sands Missile Range, Holloman AFB,
32° 11'
106° 20'
(NMRC)
Albuquerque, Roswell, NM; Amarillo, TX
Colorado Ranges Complex
Alamosa, Leadville, CO
37° 26'
105° 52'
(CoRC)
Texas Ranges Complex (TRC)
Dallas/Ft. Worth, Greenville, Waco, Johnson
32° 53'
97° 02'
Space Flight Center/Ellington Field, TX
Cape Ranges Complex (CRC)
Cape Canaveral, Palm Beach-Dade, FL
28° 33'
80° 34'
Northwest Range Complex
Seattle, Everett, Spokane, Moses Lake, WA;
47° 32'
122° 18'
(NWRC)
Klamath Falls, Eugene, OR
St. Louis
St Louis, MO
38° 45'
90° 22'
Wichita
Wichita, KS
37° 40'
97° 26'
Marietta
Marietta, GA
33° 54'
84° 31'
Glasgow
Glasgow, MT
48° 25'
106° 32'
Wilmington/Ridley
Wilmington, DE/Ridley, PA
39° 49'
75° 26'
San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) NASA Ames Research Center, CA
37° 25'
122° 03'
* * * * *
US113 Radio astronomy observations of the formaldehyde line frequencies 4825-4835 MHz and
14.47-14.5 GHz may be made at certain radio astronomy observatories as indicated below:
BANDS TO BE OBSERVED
4 GHz
14 GHz
Observatory
X
…..
National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center (NAIC), Arecibo, PR
X
X
National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Green Bank, WV
X
X
NRAO, Socorro, NM
X
…..
Allen Telescope Array (ATA), Hat Creek, CA
X
X
Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO), Big Pine, CA
X
X
NRAO’s ten Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) stations (see US131)
X
X
University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory, Stinchfield Woods, MI
X
…..
Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute, Rosman, NC
98

Federal Communications Commission

FCC 12-140

Every practicable effort will be made to avoid the assignment of frequencies to stations in the fixed
or mobile services in these bands. Should such assignments result in harmful interference to these
observations, the situation will be remedied to the extent practicable.
* * * * *
US139 Fixed stations authorized in the band 18.3-19.3 GHz that remain co-primary under the
provisions of 47 CFR 74.502(c), 74.602(g), 78.18(a)(4), and 101.147(r) may continue operations
consistent with the provisions of those sections.
* * * * *
US145 The following unwanted emission power limits from non-geostationary satellite orbit
systems in the inter-satellite service (NGSO ISS) transmitting in the band 22.55-23.55 GHz shall apply in
any 200 MHz of the passive band 23.6-24 GHz:
(a) Non-Federal licensees holding a valid authorization on [insert effective date of R&O] to operate
in this band may continue to operate as authorized, subject to proper license renewal.
(b) For all other NGSO ISS systems, based on the date that complete advance publication
information is received by the ITU’s Radiocommunication Bureau, the following limits apply:
(1) For information received before January 1, 2020: -36 dBW.
(2) For information received on or after January 1, 2020: -46 dBW.
US156 In the bands 49.7-50.2 GHz and 50.4-50.9 GHz, for earth stations in the fixed-satellite
service (Earth-to-space), the unwanted emission power in the band 50.2-50.4 GHz shall not exceed
-20 dBW/200 MHz (measured at the input of the antenna), except that the maximum unwanted emission
power may be increased to -10 dBW/200 MHz for earth stations having an antenna gain greater than or
equal to 57 dBi. These limits apply under clear-sky conditions. During fading conditions, the limits may
be exceeded by earth stations when using uplink power control.
US157 In the band 51.4-52.6 GHz, for stations in the fixed service, the unwanted emission power in
the band 52.6-54.25 GHz shall not exceed -33 dBW/100 MHz (measured at the input of antenna).
US161 In the bands 81-86 GHz, 92-94 GHz, and 94.1-95 GHz and within the coordination distances
indicated below, assignments to allocated services shall be coordinated with the following radio
astronomy observatories. New observatories shall not receive protection from fixed stations that are
licensed to operate in the one hundred most populous urbanized areas as defined by the U.S. Census
Bureau for the year 2000.
(a) Within 25 km of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory’s (NRAO’s) Very Long Baseline
Array (VLBA) Stations:
State VLBA Station
Lat. (N)
Long. (W)
AZ
Kitt Peak
31° 57' 23''
111° 36' 45''
CA
Owens Valley
37° 13' 54''
118° 16' 37''
HI
Mauna Kea
19° 48' 05''
155° 27' 20''
IA
North Liberty
41° 46' 17''
091° 34' 27''
NH
Hancock
42° 56' 01''
071° 59' 12''
NM
Los Alamos
35° 46' 30''
106° 14' 44''
NM
Pie Town
34° 18' 04''
108° 07' 09''
TX
Fort Davis
30° 38' 06''
103° 56' 41''
VI
Saint Croix
17° 45' 24''
064° 35' 01''
WA
Brewster
48° 07' 52''
119° 41' 00''
(b) Within 150 km of the following observatories:
99

Federal Communications Commission

FCC 12-140

State
Telescope and site
Lat. (N)
Long. (W)
AZ
Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Observatory, Mt. Graham
32° 42' 06''
109° 53' 28''
AZ
University of Arizona 12-m Telescope, Kitt Peak
31° 57' 12''
111° 36' 53''
CA
Caltech Telescope, Owens Valley
37° 13' 54''
118° 17' 36''
CA
Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave
37° 16' 43''
118° 08' 32''
Astronomy (CARMA)
HI
James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, Mauna Kea
19° 49' 33''
155° 28' 47''
MA
Haystack Observatory, Westford
42° 37' 24''
071° 29' 18''
NM
NRAO’s Very Large Array, Socorro
34° 04' 44''
107° 37' 06''
WV
NRAO’s Robert C. Byrd Telescope, Green Bank
38° 25' 59''
079° 50' 23''
NOTE: Satisfactory completion of the coordination procedure utilizing the automated mechanism, see
47 CFR 101.1523, will be deemed to establish sufficient separation from radio astronomy observatories,
regardless of whether the distances set forth above are met.
US197A The band 108-117.975 MHz is also allocated on a primary basis to the aeronautical
mobile (R) service (AM(R)S), limited to systems operating in accordance with recognized international
aeronautical standards. Such use shall be in accordance with Resolution 413 (Rev.WRC-07). AM(R)S
use of the band 108-112 MHz shall be limited to systems composed of ground-based transmitters and
associated receivers that provide navigational information in support of air navigation functions in
accordance with recognized international aeronautical standards. AM(R)S use of the band 108-117.975
MHz shall not constrain the use of the band 88-108 MHz by stations in the broadcasting service operating
in accordance with 47 CFR part 73.
* * * * *
US227 The bands 156.4875-156.5125 MHz and 156.5375-156.5625 MHz are also allocated to the
fixed and land mobile services on a primary basis for non-Federal use in VHF Public Coast Station
Areas 10-42. The use of these bands by the fixed and land mobile services shall not cause harmful
interference to, nor claim protection from, the maritime mobile VHF radiocommunication service.
US228D The use of the bands 161.9625-161.9875 MHz (AIS 1 with center frequency 161.975 MHz)
and 162.0125-162.0375 MHz (AIS 2 with center frequency 162.025 MHz) by the maritime mobile
service is restricted to Automatic Identification Systems (AIS), except that non-Federal stations in the
band 161.9625-161.9875 MHz may continue to operate on a primary basis according to the following
schedule: (a) In VHF Public Coast Service Areas (VPCSAs) 1-9, site-based stations licensed prior to
November 13, 2006 may continue to operate until expiration of the license term for licenses in active
status as of November 13, 2006; and (b) In VPCSAs 10-42, site-based stations licensed prior to March 2,
2009 may continue to operate until March 2, 2024. See 47 CFR 80.371(c)(1)(ii) for the definition of
VPCSAs.
* * * * *
US334 In the band 17.8-20.2 GHz, Federal space stations in both geostationary (GSO) and
non-geostationary satellite orbits (NGSO) and associated earth stations in the fixed-satellite service (FSS)
(space-to-Earth) may be authorized on a primary basis. For a Federal GSO FSS network to operate on a
primary basis, the space station shall be located outside the arc, measured from east to west, 70-120°
West longitude. Coordination between Federal FSS systems and non-Federal space and terrestrial
systems operating in accordance with the United States Table of Frequency Allocations is required.
(a) In the sub-bands 17.8-18.3 GHz and 19.3-19.7 GHz, Federal earth stations shall be authorized on
a primary basis only in the following areas: Denver, Colorado; Washington, DC; San Miguel, California;
and Guam. Prior to the commencement of non-Federal terrestrial operations in these areas, the FCC shall
coordinate all applications for new stations and modifications to existing stations with NTIA as specified
in 47 CFR 1.924(f), 74.32, and 78.19(f).
(b) In the sub-band 17.8-19.7 GHz, the power flux-density (pfd) at the surface of the Earth produced
by emissions from a Federal GSO space station or from a Federal space station in a NGSO constellation
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of 50 or fewer satellites, for all conditions and for all methods of modulation, shall not exceed the
following values in any 1 MHz band:
(1) -115 dB(W/m²) for angles of arrival above the horizontal plane (d) between 0° and 5°,
(2) -115 + 0.5(d - 5) dB(W/m²) for d between 5° and 25°, and
(3) -105 dB(W/m²) for d between 25° and 90°.
(c) In the sub-band 17.8-19.3 GHz, the pfd at the surface of the Earth produced by emissions from a
Federal space station in an NGSO constellation of 51 or more satellites, for all conditions and for all
methods of modulation, shall not exceed the following values in any 1 MHz band:
(1) -115 - X dB(W/m²) for d between 0° and 5°,
(2) -115 - X + ((10 + X)/20)(d - 5) dB(W/m²) for d between 5° and 25°, and
(3) -105 dB(W/m²) for d between 25° and 90°; where X is defined as a function of the number of
satellites, n, in an NGSO constellation as follows:
For n £ 288, X = (5/119) (n - 50) dB; and
For n > 288, X = (1/69) (n + 402) dB.
* * * * *
US338A In the band 1435-1452 MHz, operators of aeronautical telemetry stations are encouraged to
take all reasonable steps to ensure that unwanted emission power does not exceed -28 dBW/27 MHz in
the band 1400-1427 MHz.
* * * * *
US343 In the mobile service, the frequencies between 1435 and 1525 MHz will be assigned for
aeronautical telemetry and associated telecommand operations for flight testing of manned or unmanned
aircraft and missiles, or their major components. Permissible usage includes telemetry associated with
launching and reentry into the Earth’s atmosphere as well as any incidental orbiting prior to reentry of
manned objects undergoing flight tests. The following frequencies are shared on a co-equal basis with
flight telemetering mobile stations: 1444.5, 1453.5, 1501.5, 1515.5, and 1524.5 MHz.
* * * * *
US401 In the band 17.7-17.8 GHz, Federal earth stations in the fixed-satellite service (space-to-
Earth) may be authorized in the Denver, Colorado; Washington, DC; San Miguel, California; and Guam
areas on a primary basis. Prior to commencement of operations in these areas, the FCC shall coordinate
fixed service applications supporting Multichannel Video Programming Distributors (MVPD) with
NTIA.
* * * * *
US475 The use of the band 9300-9500 MHz by the aeronautical radionavigation service is limited to
airborne radars and associated airborne beacons. In addition, ground-based radar beacons in the
aeronautical radionavigation service are permitted in the band 9300-9320 MHz on the condition that
harmful interference is not caused to the maritime radionavigation service.
US476A In the band 9300-9500 MHz, Federal stations in the Earth exploration-satellite service
(active) and space research service (active) shall not cause harmful interference to, nor claim protection
from, stations of the radionavigation and Federal radiolocation services.
US482 In the band 10.6-10.68 GHz, the following provisions and urgings apply:
(a) Non-Federal use of the fixed service shall be restricted to point-to-point systems, with each station
supplying not more than -3 dBW of transmitter power to the antenna and producing not more than
40 dBW of EIRP. However, licensees holding a valid authorization on [insert effective date of R&O] to
operate in this band may continue to operate as authorized, subject to proper license renewal.
(b) In order to minimize interference to the Earth exploration-satellite service (passive) receiving in
this band, licensees of stations in the fixed service are urged to: (1) limit the maximum transmitter power
supplied to the antenna to -15 dBW; (2) limit the maximum elevation angle of the antenna main beam to
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20°; and (3) employ automatic transmitter power control (ATPC). The maximum transmitter power
supplied to the antenna of stations using ATPC may be increased by a value corresponding to the ATPC
range, up to a maximum of -3 dBW.
US519 The band 18-18.3 GHz is also allocated to the meteorological-satellite service (space-to-
Earth) on a primary basis. Its use is limited to geostationary satellites and shall be in accordance with the
provisions of Article 21, Table 21-4 of the ITU Radio Regulations.
US532 In the bands 21.2-21.4 GHz, 22.21-22.5 GHz, and 56.26-58.2 GHz, the space research and
Earth exploration-satellite services shall not receive protection from the fixed and mobile services
operating in accordance with the Table of Frequency Allocations.
US550A In the band 36-37 GHz, the following provisions shall apply:
(a) For stations in the mobile service, the transmitter power supplied to the antenna shall not exceed
-10 dBW, except that the maximum transmitter power may be increased to -3 dBW for stations used for
public safety and disaster management.
(b) For stations in the fixed service, the elevation angle of the antenna main beam shall not exceed
20° and the transmitter power supplied to the antenna shall not exceed:
(1) -5 dBW for hub stations of point-to-multipoint systems; or
(2) -10 dBW for all other stations, except that the maximum transmitter power of stations using
automatic transmitter power control (ATPC) may be increased by a value corresponding to the ATPC
range, up to a maximum of -7 dBW.

NON-FEDERAL GOVERNMENT (NG) FOOTNOTES

* * * * *
NG22 The frequencies 156.050 and 156.175 MHz may be assigned to stations in the maritime
mobile service for commercial and port operations in the New Orleans Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) area
and the frequency 156.250 MHz may be assigned to stations in the maritime mobile service for port
operations in the New Orleans and Houston VTS areas.
* * * * *
NG35 Frequencies in the bands 928-929 MHz, 932-932.5 MHz, 941-941.5 MHz, and 952-960 MHz
may be assigned for multiple address systems and associated mobile operations on a primary basis.
* * * * *
NG60 In the band 31-31.3 GHz, licensees of stations in the fixed service are urged to limit the
maximum elevation angle of the antenna main beam to 20° and to employ automatic transmitter power
control.
* * * * *
NG338A In the bands 1390-1395 MHz and 1427-1435 MHz bands, licensees are encouraged to take
all reasonable steps to ensure that unwanted emission power does not exceed the following levels in the
band 1400-1427 MHz:
(a) For stations of point-to-point systems in the fixed service: -45 dBW/27 MHz.
(b) For stations in the mobile service (except for devices authorized by the FCC for the Wireless
Medical Telemetry Service): -60 dBW/27 MHz.
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PART 74 – EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER

PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES

7. The authority citation for part 74 continues to read as follows:
AUTHORITY: 47 U.S.C. 154, 302a, 303, 307, 336(f), 336(h) and 554.
8. Section 74.32 is amended to read as follows:
§ 74.32 Operation in the 17.7-17.8 GHz and 17.8-19.7 GHz bands.
The following exclusion areas and coordination areas are established to minimize or avoid harmful
interference to Federal Government earth stations receiving in the 17.7-19.7 GHz band:
(a) No application seeking authority for fixed stations supporting the operations of Multichannel
Video Programming Distributors (MVPD) in the 17.7-17.8 GHz band or to operate in the 17.8-19.7 GHz
band for any service will be accepted for filing if the proposed station is located within 20 km of
Denver, CO (39° 43' N, 104° 46' W) or Washington, DC (38° 48' N, 76° 52' W).
(b) Any application for a new station license to provide MVPD operations in the 17.7-17.8 GHz band
or to operate in the 17.8-19.7 GHz band for any service, or for modification of an existing station license
in these bands which would change the frequency, power, emission, modulation, polarization, antenna
height or directivity, or location of such a station, must be coordinated with the Federal Government by
the Commission before an authorization will be issued, if the station or proposed station is located in
whole or in part within any of the following areas:
(1) Denver, CO area:
(i) Between latitudes 41° 30' N and 38° 30' N and between longitudes 103° 10' W and 106° 30' W.
(ii) Between latitudes 38° 30' N and 37° 30' N and between longitudes 105° 00' W and 105° 50' W.
(iii) Between latitudes 40° 08' N and 39° 56' N and between longitudes 107° 00' W and 107° 15' W.
(2) Washington, DC area:
(i) Between latitudes 38° 40' N and 38° 10' N and between longitudes 78° 50' W and 79° 20' W.
(ii) Within 178 km of 38° 48' N, 76°52' W.
(3) San Miguel, CA area:
(i) Between latitudes 34° 39' N and 34° 00' N and between longitudes 118° 52' W and 119° 24' W.
(ii) Within 200 km of 35° 44' N, 120° 45' W.
(4) Guam area: Within 100 km of 13° 35' N, 144° 51' E.
NOTE TO § 74.32: The coordinates cited in this section are specified in terms of the “North American
Datum of 1983 (NAD 83).”

PART 78 – CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE

9. The authority citation for part 78 continues to read as follows:
AUTHORITY: Secs. 2, 3, 4, 301, 303, 307, 308, 309, 48 Stat., as amended, 1064, 1065, 1066, 1081,
1082, 1083, 1084, 1085; 47 U.S.C. 152, 153, 154, 301, 303, 307, 308, 309.
10. Section 78.19 is amended by revising paragraph (f) to read as follows:
§ 78.19 Interference.
* * * * *
(f) 17.7-19.7 GHz band. The following exclusion areas and coordination areas are established to
minimize or avoid harmful interference to Federal Government earth stations receiving in the 17.7-19.7
GHz band:
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(1) No application seeking authority to operate in the 17.7-19.7 GHz band will be accepted for filing
if the proposed station is located within 50 km of Denver, CO (39° 43' N, 104° 46' W) or Washington,
DC (38° 48' N, 76° 52' W).
(2) Any application seeking authority for a new fixed station license supporting the operations of
Multichannel Video Programming Distributors (MVPD) in the 17.7-17.8 GHz band or to operate in the
17.8-19.7 GHz band for any service, or for modification of an existing station license in these bands
which would change the frequency, power, emission, modulation, polarization, antenna height or
directivity, or location of such a station, must be coordinated with the Federal Government by the
Commission before an authorization will be issued, if the station or proposed station is located in whole
or in part within any of the following areas:
(i) Denver, CO area:
(A) Between latitudes 41° 30' N and 38° 30' N and between longitudes 103° 10' W and 106° 30' W.
(B) Between latitudes 38° 30' N and 37° 30' N and between longitudes 105° 00' W and 105° 50' W.
(C) Between latitudes 40° 08' N and 39° 56' N and between longitudes 107° 00' W and 107° 15' W.
(ii) Washington, DC area:
(A) Between latitudes 38° 40' N and 38° 10' N and between longitudes 78° 50' W and 79° 20' W.
(B) Within 178 km of 38° 48' N, 76°52' W.
(iii) San Miguel, CA area:
(A) Between latitudes 34° 39' N and 34° 00' N and between longitudes 118° 52' W and 119° 24' W.
(B) Within 200 km of 35° 44' N, 120° 45' W.
(iv) Guam area: Within 100 km of 13° 35' N, 144° 51' E.
NOTE TO § 78.19(F): The coordinates cited in this section are specified in terms of the “North
American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83).”
* * * * *

PART 87 – AVIATION SERVICES

11. The authority citation for Part 87 continues to read as follows:
AUTHORITY: 47 U.S.C. 154, 303 and 307(e), unless otherwise noted.
12. Section 87.5 is amended by adding the following term and definition:
§ 87.5 Definitions.
* * * * *
Flight telemetering mobile station. A telemetering mobile station used for transmitting data from an
airborne vehicle, excluding data related to airborne testing of the vehicle itself (or major components
thereof).
* * * * *
13. Section 87.133 is amended by revising paragraph (f) to read as follows:
§ 87.133 Frequency stability.
* * * * *
(f) The carrier frequency tolerance of all transmitters operating in the 1435-1525 MHz and
2345-2395 MHz bands is 0.002 percent. The carrier frequency tolerance of all transmitters operating in
the 5091-5150 MHz band is 0.005 percent.
* * * * *
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14. Section 87.137 is amended by revising note 8 to the table of assignable emissions in
paragraph (a) to read as follows:
§ 87.137 Types of emission.
(a) * * *
Notes:
* * * * *
8The authorized bandwidth is equal to the necessary bandwidth for frequency or digitally modulated
transmitters used in aeronautical telemetering and associated aeronautical telemetry or telecommand
stations operating in the 1435-1525 MHz, 2345-2395 MHz, and 5091-5150 MHz bands. The necessary
bandwidth must be computed in accordance with part 2 of this chapter.
* * * * *
15. Section 87.139 is amended by revising the introductory text in paragraphs (a), (d), (e), and
(f) to read as follows:
§ 87.139 Emission limitations.
(a) Except for ELTs and when using single sideband (R3E, H3E, J3E), or frequency modulation (F9)
or digital modulation (F9Y) for telemetry or telecommand in the 1435-1525 MHz, 2345-2395 MHz, and
5091-5150 MHz bands or digital modulation (G7D) for differential GPS, the mean power of any
emission must be attenuated below the mean power of the transmitter (pY) as follows:
* * * * *
(d) Except for telemetry in the 1435-1525 MHz band, when the frequency is removed from the
assigned frequency by more than 250 percent of the authorized bandwidth for aircraft stations above
30 MHz and all ground stations the attenuation must be at least 43+10 log10pY dB.
(e) When using frequency modulation or digital modulation for telemetry or telecommand in the
1435-1525 MHz, 2345-2395 MHz, or 5091-5150 MHz bands with an authorized bandwidth equal to or
less than 1 MHz the emissions must be attenuated as follows:
* * * * *
(f) When using frequency modulation or digital modulation for telemetry or telecommand in the
1435-1525 MHz, 2345-2395 MHz, or 5091-5150 MHz bands with an authorized bandwidth greater than
1 MHz, the emissions must be attenuated as follows:
* * * * *
16. Section 87.173 is amended by revising the frequency table in paragraph (b) as follows:
a. The entry for the 2310-2320 MHz band is removed.
b. Entries for the 5091-5150 MHz and 24450-24650 MHz bands are added.
c. The entry for the 5000-5250 MHz band is replaced with an entry for the 5030-5091 MHz band.
The additions and revisions read as follows:
§ 87.173 Frequencies.
* * * * *
(b) Frequency table:
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Frequency or frequency band
Subpart
Class of station
Remarks
*
*
*
*
5030-5091 MHz…………….
Q
MA, RLW
Microwave landing systems.
5031.000 MHz………………
Q
RLT
5091-5150 MHz………….....
J
MA, FAT
Aeronautical telemetry.
*
*
*
*
24450-24650 MHz………….
F, Q
MA, RL
Aeronautical radionavigation.
*
*
*
*
* * * * *
17. Section 87.187 is amended by revising paragraph (p) to read as follows:
§ 87.187 Frequencies.
* * * * *
(p) The 1435-1525 MHz and 2360-2395 MHz bands are available on a primary basis and the
2345-2360 MHz band is available on a secondary basis for telemetry and telecommand associated with
the flight testing of aircraft, missiles, or related major components. This includes launching into space,
reentry into the Earth's atmosphere and incidental orbiting prior to reentry. In the 1435-1525 MHz band,
the following frequencies are shared on a co-equal basis with flight telemetering mobile stations: 1444.5,
1453.5, 1501.5, 1515.5, and 1524.5 MHz. In the 2360-2395 MHz band, the following frequencies may be
assigned for telemetry and associated telecommand operations of expendable and re-usable launch
vehicles, whether or not such operations involve flight testing: 2364.5, 2370.5 and 2382.5 MHz. See
§87.303(d).
Note to paragraph (p): Aeronautical telemetry operations must protect Miscellaneous Wireless
Communications Services operating in the 2345-2360 MHz band.
* * * * *
18. Section 87.303 is amended by revising paragraph (d) to read as follows:
§ 87.303 Frequencies.
* * * * *
(d) Aeronautical mobile telemetry (AMT) operations are conducted in the 1435-1525 MHz,
2345-2395 MHz, and 5091-5150 MHz bands on a co-equal basis with U.S. Government stations.
(1) Frequencies in the 1435-1525 MHz and 2360-2395 MHz bands are assigned in the mobile service
primarily for aeronautical telemetry and associated telecommand operations for flight testing of aircraft
and missiles, or their major components. The 2345-2360 MHz band is also available for these purposes
on a secondary basis. Permissible uses of these bands include telemetry and associated telecommand
operations associated with the launching and reentry into the Earth's atmosphere, as well as any incidental
orbiting prior to reentry, of objects undergoing flight tests. In the 1435-1525 MHz band, the following
frequencies are shared on a co-equal basis with flight telemetering mobile stations: 1444.5, 1453.5,
1501.5, 1515.5, and 1524.5 MHz. In the 2360-2395 MHz band, the following frequencies may be
assigned for telemetry and associated telecommand operations of expendable and re-usable launch
vehicles, whether or not such operations involve flight testing: 2364.5, 2370.5 and 2382.5 MHz. All
other mobile telemetry uses of the 2360-2395 MHz band shall be on a non-interfering and unprotected
basis to the above uses.
(2) Frequencies in the 5091-5150 MHz band are assigned in the aeronautical mobile service on a
primary basis for flight testing of aircraft. AMT use of these frequencies is restricted to aircraft stations
transmitting to aeronautical stations (AMT ground stations) in the flight test areas listed in 47 CFR 2.106,
footnote US111.
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(3) The authorized bandwidths for stations operating in the 1435-1525 MHz, 2345-2395 MHz, and
5091-5150 MHz bands are normally 1, 3 or 5 MHz. Applications for greater bandwidths will be
considered in accordance with the provisions of § 87.135. Each assignment will be centered on a
frequency between 1435.5 MHz and 1524.5 MHz, between 2345.5 MHz and 2394.5 MHz, or between
5091.5 MHz and 5149.5 MHz, with 1 MHz channel spacing.
* * * * *
19. Section 87.305 is amended by revising paragraph (a)(1) to read as follows:
§ 87.305 Frequency coordination.
(a)(1) Each application for a new station license, renewal or modification of an existing license
concerning flight test frequencies, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, must be
accompanied by a statement from a frequency advisory committee. The committee must comment on the
frequencies requested or the proposed changes in the authorized station and the probable interference to
existing stations. The committee must consider all stations operating on the frequencies requested or
assigned within 320 km (200 mi) of the proposed area of operation and all prior coordinations and
assignments on the proposed frequency(ies). The committee must also recommend frequencies resulting
in the minimum interference. The Committee must coordinate in writing all requests for frequencies or
proposed operating changes in the 1435-1525 MHz, 2345-2395 MHz, and 5091-5150 MHz bands with
the responsible Government Area Frequency Coordinators listed in the NTIA “Manual of Regulations
and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management.” In addition, committee recommendations
may include comments on other technical factors and may contain recommended restrictions which it
believes should appear on the license.
* * * * *
20. Section 87.475 is amended by adding paragraphs (b)(11) and (b)(14) to read as follows:
§ 87.475 Frequencies.
* * * * *
(b) * * *
* * * * *
(11) 5030-5091 MHz: This band is to be used for the operation of the international standard system
(microwave landing system).
* * * * *
(14) 24,450-24,650 MHz: In this band, land-based radionavigation aids are permitted where they
operate with airborne radionavigation devices.
* * * * *

PART 90 – PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES

21. The authority citation for Part 90 continues to read as follows:
AUTHORITY: Sections 4(i), 11, 303(g), 303(r), and 332(c)(7) of the Communications Act of 1934, as
amended, 47 U.S.C. 154(i), 161, 303(g), 303(r), 332(c)(7).
22. Section 90.103 is amended by revising the Kilohertz portion of the Radiolocation Service
Frequency Table in paragraph (b) to read as follows and by removing and reserving paragraphs (c)(25),
(c)(26), (c)(27), and (c)(28):
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§ 90.103 Radiolocation Service.
* * * * *
(b) * * *
RADIOLOCATION SERVICE FREQUENCY TABLE
Frequency or band
Class of station(s)
Limitation
Kilohertz
70 to 90…………….…….
Radiolocation land or mobile
1
90 to 110…………………
Radiolocation land
2
110 to 130………………..
Radiolocation land or mobile
1
1705 to 1715……….…….
......do
4, 5, 6
1715 to 1750……….…….
......do
5, 6
1750 to 1800……….…….
......do
5, 6
3230 to 3400……….…….
......do
6, 8
Megahertz
* *
* *
*
(c) * * *
* * * * *
(25) [Reserved]
(26) [Reserved]
(27) [Reserved]
(28) [Reserved]
* * * * *

PART 97 – AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE

23. The authority citation for part 97 continues to read as follows:
AUTHORITY: 48 Stat. 1066, 1082, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 154, 303. Interpret or apply 48 Stat. 1064-
1068, 1081-1105, as amended; 47 U.S.C. 151-155, 301-609, unless otherwise noted.
24. Section 97.301 is amended by revising the kHz portion of the tables in paragraphs (b), (c),
and (d) to read as follows:
§ 97.301 Authorized frequency bands.
* * * * *
(b) * * *
Sharing requirements
Wavelength band
ITU Region 1
ITU Region 2
ITU Region 3
see § 97.303
(Paragraph)
MF
kHz
kHz
kHz
160 m…………..
1810-1850………
1800-2000…..…..
1800-2000………
(a), (g)
*
*
*
*
*
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(c) * * *
Sharing requirements
Wavelength band
ITU Region 1
ITU Region 2
ITU Region 3
see § 97.303
(Paragraph)
MF
kHz
kHz
kHz
160 m………….
1810-1850……...
1800-2000…........
1800-2000…........
(a), (g)
*
*
*
*
*
(d) * * *
Sharing requirements
Wavelength band
ITU Region 1
ITU Region 2
ITU Region 3
see § 97.303
(Paragraph)
MF
kHz
kHz
kHz
160 m…………..
1810-1850…........
1800-2000…........
1800-2000……....
(a), (g)
*
*
*
*
*
* * * * *
25. Section 97.303 is amended by revising paragraphs (c) and (g) to read as follows:
§ 97.303

Frequency sharing requirements.

* * * * *
(c) Amateur stations transmitting in the 76-77.5 GHz segment, the 78-81 GHz segment, the 136-141
GHz segment, or the 241-248 GHz segment must not cause harmful interference to, and must accept
interference from, stations authorized by the United States Government, the FCC, or other nations in the
radiolocation service.
* * * * *
(g) Amateur stations transmitting in the 160 m band must not cause harmful interference to, and must
accept interference from, stations authorized by other nations as follows:
(1) In Region 1: The radiolocation service in the 1800-1810 kHz segment and the fixed and mobile
except aeronautical mobile services in the 1850-2000 kHz segment. In the countries listed in footnote
5.93 (of 47 CFR 2.106), the fixed and land mobile services in the 1800-1810 kHz segment, and in the
countries listed in footnotes 5.98 and 5.99, the fixed and mobile except aeronautical mobile services in
the 1810-1830 kHz segment.
(2) In Region 2: The fixed, mobile except aeronautical mobile, radiolocation, and radionavigation
services in the 1850-2000 kHz segment.
(3) In Region 3: The fixed, mobile except aeronautical mobile, and radionavigation services.
* * * * *
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APPENDIX E

Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

1. As required by the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980, as amended (RFA),287 the
Commission has prepared this present Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (IRFA) of the possible
significant economic impact on small entities by the policies and rules proposed in this Notice of
Proposed Rulemaking (Notice). Written public comments are requested on this IRFA. Comments must
be identified as responses to the IRFA and must be filed by the deadlines specified in the Notice for
comments. The Commission will send a copy of this Notice, including this IRFA, to the Chief Counsel
for Advocacy of the Small Business Administration (SBA).288 In addition, the Notice and IRFA (or
summaries thereof) will be published in the Federal Register.289

A.

Need for, and Objectives of, the Proposed Rules.

2. We propose to amend parts 1, 2, 74, 78, 87, 90, and 97 of the Commission’s rules to
implement allocation decisions from the World Radiocommunication Conference (Geneva, 2007)
(WRC-07) concerning the radio frequency (RF) spectrum between 108 MHz and 20.2 GHz and otherwise
make certain updates to our rules in this frequency range. The rules proposed in this Notice affect the
frequency bands and radio services discussed in Section D, below.

B.

Legal Basis.

3. The proposed action is authorized under Sections 1, 4, 301, 302(a), and 303(b), (c), and (f) of
the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. Sections 151, 154, 301, 302(a), and 303(b), (c),
and (f).

C.

Description and Estimate of the Number of Small Entities to Which the Proposed
Rule Will Apply.

4. The RFA directs agencies to provide a description of and, where feasible, an estimate of, the
number of small entities that may be affected by the proposed rules, if adopted.290 The RFA generally
defines the term “small entity” as having the same meaning as the terms “small business,” “small
organization,” and “small governmental jurisdiction.”291 In addition, the term “small business” has the
same meaning as the term “small business concern” under the Small Business Act.292 A “small business
concern” is one which: (1) is independently owned and operated; (2) is not dominant in its field of
operation; and (3) satisfies any additional criteria established by the Small Business Administration
(SBA).293


287 See 5 U.S.C. § 603. The RFA, see 5 U.S.C. § 601-612, has been amended by the Small Business Regulatory
Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, (SBREFA) Pub. L. No. 104-121, Title II, 110 Stat. 857 (1996).
288 See 5 U.S.C. § 603(a).
289 See 5 U.S.C. § 603(a).
290 5 U.S.C. § 603(b)(3).
291 5 U.S.C. § 601(6).
292 5 U.S.C. § 601(3) (incorporating by reference the definition of “small-business concern” in the Small Business
Act, 15 U.S.C. § 632). Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. § 601(3), the statutory definition of a small business applies “unless an
agency, after consultation with the Office of Advocacy of the Small Business Administration and after opportunity
for public comment, establishes one or more definitions of such term which are appropriate to the activities of the
agency and publishes such definition(s) in the Federal Register.”
293 15 U.S.C. § 632.
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FCC 12-140

Small Businesses, Small Organizations, and Small Governmental Jurisdictions

. Our action may,
over time, affect small entities that are not easily categorized at present. We therefore describe here, at
the outset, three comprehensive, statutory small entity size standards.294 First, nationwide, there are a
total of approximately 27.5 million small businesses, according to the SBA.295 In addition, a “small
organization” is generally “any not-for-profit enterprise which is independently owned and operated and
is not dominant in its field.”296 Nationwide, as of 2007, there were approximately 1,621,315 small
organizations.297 Finally, the term “small governmental jurisdiction” is defined generally as
“governments of cities, towns, townships, villages, school districts, or special districts, with a population
of less than fifty thousand.”298 Census Bureau data for 2011 indicate that there were 89,476 local
governmental jurisdictions in the United States.299 We estimate that, of this total, as many as 88,506
entities may qualify as “small governmental jurisdictions.”300 Thus, we estimate that most governmental
jurisdictions are small.

Amateur Radio Service

. Because “small entities,” as defined in the RFA, are not persons eligible for
licensing in the amateur service, this proposed rule does not apply to “small entities.” Rather, it applies
exclusively to individuals who are the control operators of amateur radio stations.

Satellite Telecommunications and All Other Telecommunications

. Two economic census categories
address the satellite industry. The first category has a small business size standard of $15 million or less
in average annual receipts, under SBA rules.301 The second has a size standard of $25 million or less in
annual receipts.302
The category of Satellite Telecommunications “comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing
telecommunications services to other establishments in the telecommunications and broadcasting
industries by forwarding and receiving communications signals via a system of satellites or reselling
satellite telecommunications.”303 Census Bureau data for 2007 show that 512 Satellite
Telecommunications firms operated for that entire year.304 Of this total, 464 firms had annual receipts of


294 See 5 U.S.C. §§ 601(3)–(6).
295 See SBA, Office of Advocacy, “Frequently Asked Questions,” web.sba.gov/faqs (last visited May 6, 2011;
figures are from 2009).
296 5 U.S.C. § 601(4).
297 INDEPENDENT SECTOR, THE NEW NONPROFIT ALMANAC & DESK REFERENCE (2010).
298 5 U.S.C. § 601(5).
299 U.S. CENSUS BUREAU, STATISTICAL ABSTRACT OF THE UNITED STATES: 2011, Table 427 (2007).
300 The 2007 U.S Census data for small governmental organizations are not presented based on the size of the
population in each such organization. There were 89,476 small governmental organizations in 2007. If we assume
that county, municipal, township, and school district organizations are more likely than larger governmental
organizations to have populations of 50,000 or less, the total of these organizations is 52,125. If we make the same
assumption about special districts and also assume that special districts are different from county, municipal,
township, and school districts, in 2007 there were 37,381 special districts. Therefore, of the 89,476 small
governmental organizations documented in 2007, as many as 89,506 may be considered small under the applicable
standard. This data may overestimate the number of such organizations that has a population of 50,000 or less. U.S.
CENSUS BUREAU, STATISTICAL ABSTRACT OF THE UNITED STATES 2011, Tables 427, 426 (Data cited
therein are from 2007).
301 13 C.F.R. § 121.201, North American Industry Classification System (“NAICS”) code 517410.
302 13 C.F.R. § 121.201, NAICS code 517919.
303 U.S. Census Bureau, 2007 NAICS Definitions, “517410 Satellite Telecommunications.”
304 See http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/IBQTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=&-_skip=900&;-
ds_name=EC0751SSSZ4&-_lang=en.
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under $10 million, and 18 firms had receipts of $10 million to $24,999,999.305 Consequently, the
Commission estimates that the majority of Satellite Telecommunications firms are small entities that
might be affected by our action.
The second category, i.e. “All Other Telecommunications” comprises “establishments primarily engaged
in providing specialized telecommunications services, such as satellite tracking, communications
telemetry, and radar station operation. This industry also includes establishments primarily engaged in
providing satellite terminal stations and associated facilities connected with one or more terrestrial
systems and capable of transmitting telecommunications to, and receiving telecommunications from,
satellite systems. Establishments providing Internet services or voice over Internet protocol (VoIP)
services via client-supplied telecommunications connections are also included in this industry.”306 For
this category, Census Bureau data for 2007 show that there were a total of 2,383 firms that operated for
the entire year.307 Of this total, 2,347 firms had annual receipts of under $25 million and 12 firms had
annual receipts of $25 million to $49, 999,999.308 Consequently, the Commission estimates that the
majority of All Other Telecommunications firms are small entities.

D.

Description of Projected Reporting, Record Keeping, and Other Compliance
Requirements.

5. In the following paragraphs, we describe the proposals and their expected impact on small
entities. First, we describe the proposed deletion of unused non-Federal allocations. Second, we describe
all other proposed changes. We request comment on our analysis.
6. Deletion of Unused Allocations. The Notice proposes to delete the following unused
allocations: (1) the radiolocation service (RLS) from the 1900-2000 kHz band; (2) the fixed-satellite
service (FSS) from the 1390-1392 MHz and 1430-1432 MHz bands; and (3) the aeronautical mobile
service (AMS)(telemetry) from the 2310-2320 MHz band. Because there are no licensees operating
stations in the aforementioned radiocommunication services and frequency bands, the proposed deletions
will have no impact on small entities.
7. The Notice also solicits comment on deleting the aeronautical mobile service allocation from
the 31-31.3 GHz band. Because there is no Part 87 equipment authorized above 20 GHz, we believe that
it is unlikely that this service would be used in the foreseeable future. Therefore, we believe that the
proposed deletions will not affect small businesses.
8. 135.7-137.8 kHz. The Notice seeks comment on whether this band should be allocated to the
amateur service on a secondary basis. The only non-Federal use of this band is by Part 15 devices, such
as Power Line Carrier (PLC) systems. If the band is allocated to the amateur service, amateur stations
and PLC systems that operate PLC systems on electric transmission lines will most likely require
coordination. We believe that any additional coordination requirements would have a de minimis impact
on electric power companies.


305 See http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/IBQTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=&-_skip=900&-ds_name=EC0751SSSZ4&;-
_lang=en.
306 http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/sssd/naics/naicsrch?code=517919&search=2007%20NAICS%20Search.
307 http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/IBQTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=&-_skip=900&-ds_name=EC0751SSSZ4&;-
_lang=en.
308 http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/IBQTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=&-_skip=900&-ds_name=EC0751SSSZ4&;-
_lang=en.
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9. 156.4875-156.5625 MHz. The Notice proposes to allocate the 156.4875-156.5125 and
156.5375-156.5625 MHz bands to the fixed service (FS) and land mobile service on a primary basis for
non-Federal use, subject to not causing harmful interference to, nor claiming protection from, the
maritime mobile VHF radiocommunication service. The Notice also proposed to reallocate the
156.5125-156.5375 MHz band to the MMS (distress, urgency, safety and calling via digital selective
calling). Because all existing MMS licensees would be protected from any interference caused by the
proposals, the only possible impact would be to the 20 call signs authorizing land mobile service use.
Because 18 of these call signs are held by the State of Arizona; one is held by the County of Los Angeles,
California (CA); and one is held by the City of La Mesa, CA, which has a population of 57,065 (2010
census), none of these licensees are small governmental jurisdictions.
10. AIS satellite reception. The Notice proposes to permit satellites to receive Automatic
Identification System (AIS) transmissions. Because this use will not be protected from harmful
interference due to the operation of terrestrial services, no small entity will be negatively impacted. We
believe that there may be a positive impact on Orbcomm Inc., which is a small business, if this allocation
is adopted.
11. 108-117.975 MHz. The Notice proposes to allocate the band to the aeronautical mobile
route service (AM(R)S) on a primary basis and to add new footnote US197A to the U.S. Table. US197A
states that AM(R)S use of the 108-117.975 MHz band must not: 1) cause harmful interference to the
aeronautical radionavigation service (ARNS) (see Resolution 413); and 2) constrain the use of the
88-108 MHz band by FM radio stations operating in accordance with 47 CFR part 73. Because all
incumbent licensees would be protected from interference caused by the new allocation, there can be no
significant economic impact on small entities.
12. 960-1164 MHz. The Notice proposes to allocate the band to the AM(R)S on a primary basis
and to add RR 5.327A to the U.S. Table. RR 5.327A states that AM(R)S use of the 960-1164 MHz band
is limited to systems that operate in accordance with Resolution 417, which states that AM(R)S must not
cause harmful interference to the ARNS. Because all incumbent licensees would be protected from
interference caused by the new allocation, there can be no significant economic impact on small entities.
13. 5091-5150 MHz. The Notice proposes to allocate the band to the AMS on a primary basis
and to add RR 5.444B to the U.S. Table. RR 5.444B, inter alia, restricts AMS use of the
5091-5150 MHz band to: 1) AM(R)S systems operating in accordance with international aeronautical
standards, limited to surface applications at airports, and in accordance with Resolution 748, which states
that this AM(R)S use may not cause harmful interference to the ARNS; 2) AMT transmissions from
aircraft stations in accordance with Resolution 418, which requires that AMT operations use the
spectrum sharing criteria set forth in Annex 1 of that Resolution; and 3) aeronautical security
transmissions in accordance with Resolution 419, which states that administrations, in making
assignments, shall ensure that AM(R)S requirements take precedence over AMS applications. Currently,
non-Federal use of the 5091-5150 MHz band is limited to feeder uplinks for non-geostationary satellite
orbit systems in the mobile-satellite service. No harmful interference is expected to the receivers on
board the space stations.
14. 1390-1395 and 1427-1435 MHz. The Notice proposes to encourage licensees of stations
authorized pursuant to Parts 27 and 90 of the Commission’s rules that transmit in the 1390-1395 MHz
and 1427-1435 MHz band to comply with WRC-07’s non-mandatory maximum values. The
Commission has issued 64 call signs to 1 licensee (TerreStar 1.4 Holdings LLC) for the 1390-1395 MHz
band and 13 call signs to 2 licensees (TerreStar 1.4 Holdings LLC and Mississippi State University) for
the 1432-1435 MHz band. The Commission has issued 129 call signs to 47 licensees in the
1427-1432 MHz band. We believe that many of the licensees operating in these bands are small entities
and that any costs and/or administrative burdens associated with the proposal will not be significant or
otherwise unduly burden those small entities.
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15. 1435-1452 MHz. The Notice proposes to encourage operators of aeronautical mobile
telemetry (AMT) stations that transmit in the 1435-1452 MHz band to comply with WRC-07’s
non-mandatory unwanted emission level. The Notice also request comment on whether AMT operators
that can not meet this unwanted emission level should be required to seek their operational requirements
in the 1452-1525 MHz band prior to operating in the 1435-1452 MHz band. As of April 24, 2012, the
Commission has issued 23 calls to 13 licensees for stations in the Aeronautical and Fixed Service to
operate in the 1435-1452 MHz band. We believe that at most 4 of these licensees are small businesses
and that any costs and/or administrative burdens associated with the proposal will not unduly burden or
have a significant economic impact on those limited number of small entities.
16. 9000-9200 MHz. The Notice proposes to raise the secondary Federal RLS from secondary
to primary status. Because non-Federal RLS use is authorized on the condition that it not cause harmful
interference to the secondary Federal RLS, the upgrade of the Federal RLS can have no significant
economic impact on small entities.
17. 9300-9500 MHz. The Notice proposes to raise the secondary Federal RLS from secondary
to primary status and to also allocate the 9300-9500 MHz band to the Earth exploration-satellite service
(EESS)(active) and space research service (SRS)(active). Because non-Federal RLS use is authorized on
the condition that it not cause harmful interference to the secondary Federal RLS, the upgrade of the
Federal RLS can have no significant economic impact on small entities. We also believe that the
proposed EESS (active) and SRS (active) allocations will have no significant economic impact on small
entities.
18. 9800-9900 MHz. The Notice proposes to allocate the 9300-9500 MHz band to the
EESS (active) and SRS (active) on a secondary basis. Because non-Federal RLS use is on a secondary
basis to Federal RLS, we do believe that the proposed additional uses will have no significant economic
impact on small entities.
19. 10.6-10.68 GHz. The Notice proposes to limit the power supplied to the antenna to -3 dBW
(instead of -3 dBW/250 kHz) and to add advisory language for fixed point-to-point systems. The Notice
also solicits comment on whether more stringent operating requirements should apply to future fixed
stations operating in this band. Because most licensed fixed stations already meet the proposed -3 dBW
requirement, we do not believe that this proposal will affect a substantial number of small entities. We
also do not believe that the advisory language and more stringent operating requirements would affect a
substantial number of small entities.
20. GOES Expansion. The Notice proposes to allocate the 18-18.1 GHz band to the
meteorological-satellite service (space-to-Earth) on a primary basis. The use of this allocation is
expected to be limited to three locations. This band is allocated to the non-Federal FS on a primary basis.
If adopted, this proposal would limit future FS licensing near the receiving earth stations. We do not
believe that this proposal will affect a substantial number of small entities.
21. 22.55-23.55 GHz. The Notice proposes to adopt the WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted
emission limits from all new non-geostationary satellite orbit systems in the inter-satellite service
transmitting in the 22.55-23.55 GHz band, and requests comment on how these limits should apply to the
only incumbent licensee’s (Iridium’s) satellites on a going-forward basis. We do not believe that this
proposal will affect a substantial number of small entities.
22. 31-31.3 GHz. The Notice proposes to urge licensees of fixed stations transmitting in the
31-31.3 GHz band to limit the maximum elevation angle of the antenna main beam to 20° and to employ
automatic transmitter power control. The Notice also requests comment on whether the Commission
adopt WRC-07’s mandatory unwanted emission limits for these stations. As of April 24, 2012, the
Commission has issued 852 call signs to operate in the 31-31.3 GHz band: 109 licenses (777 call signs)
114

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in the Local Multipoint Distribution Service (LMDS); 19 licensees (23 call signs) in the Common Carrier
Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave Service (CF) to 19 licensees; 9 licensees (9 call signs) in the Local
Television Transmission Service (CT); 5 licensees (6 call signs) in the Microwave Public Safety Pool
(MW); and 1 licensee (the State of Nevada, with 37 call signs) in the Microwave Industrial/Business Pool
(MG). We believe that many of the LMDS licensees are small businesses, that at most 2 of the CF
licensees are small businesses, that at most 3 of the CT licensees are small businesses, that at most 1 of
the MW licensees are small governmental jurisdictions, and that the sole MG licensee is not a small
entity. We do not believe that any costs and/or administrative burdens associated with the proposal will
unduly burden or have a significant economic impact on those limited number of small entities.
23. 36-37, 49.7-40.2, 50.4-50.9, and 51.4-52.6 GHz. The Notice proposes to adopt WRC-07’s:
1) spectrum sharing criteria for stations in the fixed and mobile services transmitting in the 36-37 GHz
band; 2) mandatory unwanted emission limits for earth stations in the fixed-satellite service transmitting
in the 49.7-40.2 and 50.4-50.9 GHz bands; and 3) mandatory unwanted emission limits for fixed stations
transmitting in the 51.4-52.6 GHz band. Because the Commission has not issued licenses for the
36-37 GHz, 49.7-40.2 GHz, 50.4-50.9 GHz, and 51.4-52.6 GHz bands, these proposals will have no
significant economic impact on small entities.

E.

Steps Taken to Minimize Significant Economic Impact on Small Entities, and
Significant Alternatives Considered.

24. The RFA requires an agency to describe any significant alternatives that it has considered in
reaching its proposed approach, which may include the following four alternatives (among others):
(1) the establishment of differing compliance or reporting requirements or timetables that take into
account the resources available to small entities; (2) the clarification, consolidation, or simplification of
compliance or reporting requirements under the rule for small entities; (3) the use of performance, rather
than design, standards; and (4) an exemption from coverage of the rule, or any part thereof, for small
entities.309
25. As we have explained in detail in Section D, we do not expect that our proposals will have a
significant economic impact on small entities. However, the Notice requests comment on interference
mitigation techniques, other than those adopted at WRC-07, which would lessen the long-term impact on
all licensees in the 10.6-10.68 GHz, 22.55-23.55 GHz, and 31-31.3 GHz bands, while fully protecting
passive sensor operations.

F.

Federal Rules that May Duplicate, Overlap, or Conflict With the Proposed Rule.

26. None.


309 See 5 U.S.C. § 603(c).
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FCC 12-140

APPENDIX F

Final Rules

For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Federal Communications Commission amends 47 CFR
parts 2, 15, and 90 as follows:

PART 2 – FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS;

GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS

1. The authority citation for part 2 continues to read as follows:
AUTHORITY: 47 U.S.C. 154, 302a, 303, and 336, unless otherwise noted.
2. Section 2.106, the Table of Frequency Allocations, is amended as follows:
a. Pages 27-28, 32, 36-37, 40, 47, 51-52, and 54 are revised.
b. In the list of United States (US) Footnotes, footnotes US83, US97, US109, US128, US130, US131,
and US288 are added; footnotes US58, US277, US338, US348, US355, and US361 are removed; and
footnote US117 is revised.
c. In the list of non-Federal Government (NG) Footnotes, footnotes NG32, NG43, and NG50 are added;
and footnotes NG12, NG42, NG134, and NG168 are removed.
d. In the list of Federal Government (G) Footnotes, footnotes G27 and G117 are revised.
§ 2.106 Table of Frequency Allocations.
The revisions and additions read as follows:
* * * * *
116

Table of Frequency Allocations
410-698 MHz (UHF)
Page 27
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
410-420
410-420
410-420
FIXED
FIXED
Private Land Mobile (90)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE
MedRadio (95I)
SPACE RESEARCH (space-to-space) 5.268
SPACE RESEARCH
(space-to-space) 5.268
US13 US64 G5
US13 US64
420-430
420-450
420-450
FIXED
RADIOLOCATION G2 G129
Amateur US270
Private Land Mobile (90)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MedRadio (95I)
Radiolocation
Amateur Radio (97)
5.269 5.270 5.271
430-432
430-432
AMATEUR
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
5.271 5.272 5.273 5.274 5.275
5.276 5.277
5.271 5.276 5.277 5.278 5.279
432-438
432-438
AMATEUR
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
Earth exploration-satellite (active)
Earth exploration-satellite (active) 5.279A
5.279A
5.138 5.271 5.272 5.276 5.277
5.280 5.281 5.282
5.271 5.276 5.277 5.278 5.279 5.281 5.282
438-440
438-440
AMATEUR
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
5.271 5.273 5.274 5.275 5.276
5.277 5.283
5.271 5.276 5.277 5.278 5.279
440-450
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Radiolocation
5.286 US64 US87 US230
5.282 5.286 US64 US87 US230
5.269 5.270 5.271 5.284 5.285 5.286
US269 US270 US397 G8
US269 US397
450-455
450-454
450-454
Remote Pickup (74D)
FIXED
LAND MOBILE
Low Power Auxiliary (74H)
MOBILE 5.286AA
Private Land Mobile (90)
5.286 US64 US87
5.286 US64 US87 NG112 NG124
MedRadio (95I)
454-456
454-455
FIXED
Public Mobile (22)
LAND MOBILE
Maritime (80)
5.209 5.271 5.286 5.286A 5.286B 5.286C 5.286D 5.286E
US64 NG32 NG112 NG148
MedRadio (95I)
455-456
455-456
455-456
455-456
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
LAND MOBILE
Remote Pickup (74D)
MOBILE 5.286AA
MOBILE 5.286AA
MOBILE 5.286AA
Low Power Auxiliary (74H)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-
MedRadio (95I)
space) 5.286A 5.286B 5.286C
5.209 5.271 5.286A 5.286B
5.209 5.271 5.286A 5.286B
5.286C 5.286E
5.209
5.286C 5.286E
US64
US64
117

456-459
456-459
456-460
FIXED
FIXED
Public Mobile (22)
MOBILE 5.286AA
LAND MOBILE
Maritime (80)
5.271 5.287 5.288
5.287 US64 US288
Private Land Mobile (90)
459-460
459-460
459-460
459-460
MedRadio (95I)
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE 5.286AA
MOBILE 5.286AA
MOBILE 5.286AA
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-
space) 5.286A 5.286B 5.286C
5.209 5.271 5.286A 5.286B
5.209 5.271 5.286A 5.286B
5.287 US64 US288 NG32 NG112
5.286C 5.286E
5.209
5.286C 5.286E
NG124 NG148
460-470
460-470
460-462.5375
FIXED
Meteorological-satellite
FIXED
Private Land Mobile (90)
MOBILE 5.286AA
(space-to-Earth)
LAND MOBILE
Meteorological-satellite (space-to-Earth)
5.289 US201 US209 NG124
462.5375-462.7375
LAND MOBILE
Personal Radio (95)
5.289 US201
462.7375-467.5375
FIXED
Maritime (80)
LAND MOBILE
Private Land Mobile (90)
5.287 5.289 US73 US201 US209
US288 NG124
467.5375-467.7375
LAND MOBILE
Maritime (80)
5.287 5.289 US201 US288
Personal Radio (95)
467.7375-470
FIXED
Maritime (80)
LAND MOBILE
5.287 5.289 US73 US201
Private Land Mobile (90)
5.287 5.288 5.289 5.290
US209 US288
5.289 US73 US201 US288 NG124
470-790
470-512
470-585
470-608
470-512
Public Mobile (22)
BROADCASTING
BROADCASTING
FIXED
FIXED
Broadcast Radio (TV)(73)
Fixed
MOBILE
LAND MOBILE
LPTV, TV Translator/Booster (74G)
Mobile
BROADCASTING
BROADCASTING
Low Power Auxiliary (74H)
5.292 5.293
NG5 NG14 NG66 NG115 NG149
Private Land Mobile (90)
512-608
5.291 5.298
512-608
Broadcast Radio (TV)(73)
BROADCASTING
585-610
BROADCASTING
LPTV, TV Translator/Booster (74G)
FIXED
5.297
NG5 NG14 NG115 NG149
Low Power Auxiliary (74H)
MOBILE
608-614
608-614
BROADCASTING
RADIO ASTRONOMY
LAND MOBILE (medical telemetry and medical telecommand)
Personal Radio (95)
RADIONAVIGATION
Mobile-satellite except aeronautical
RADIO ASTRONOMY US74
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space)
5.149 5.305 5.306 5.307
610-890
US246
FIXED
614-698
614-698
614-698
MOBILE 5.313A 5.317A
BROADCASTING
BROADCASTING
Broadcast Radio (TV)(73)
BROADCASTING
Fixed
LPTV, TV Translator/Booster (74G)
Mobile
Low Power Auxiliary (74H)
5.149 5.291A 5.294 5.296
5.300 5.302 5.304 5.306
5.293 5.309 5.311A
NG5 NG14 NG115 NG149
5.311A 5.312
5.149 5.305 5.306 5.307
5.311A 5.320
Page 28
118

1390-1395
1390-1392
FIXED
Wireless Communications (27)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Fixed-satellite (Earth-to-space) US368
5.339 US37 US342 US385 US398
1392-1395
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.339 US37 US342 US385 US398
5.339 US37 US342 US385 US398
1395-1400
LAND MOBILE (medical telemetry and medical telecommand)
Personal Radio (95)
5.149 5.338 5.338A 5.339
5.149 5.334 5.339
5.339 US37 US342 US385 US398
1400-1427
1400-1427
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY US74
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.340 5.341
5.341 US246
1427-1429
1427-1429.5
1427-1429.5
SPACE OPERATION (Earth-to-space)
LAND MOBILE (medical telemetry
LAND MOBILE (telemetry and telecommand)
Private Land Mobile (90)
FIXED
and medical telecommand) US350
Fixed (telemetry)
Personal Radio (95)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.338A 5.341
1429-1452
1429-1452
5.341 US37 US398
5.341 US37 US350 US398
FIXED
FIXED
1429.5-1432
1429.5-1430
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile MOBILE 5.343
FIXED (telemetry and telecommand)
LAND MOBILE (telemetry and telecommand)
5.341 US37 US350 US398
1430-1432
FIXED (telemetry and telecommand)
LAND MOBILE (telemetry and telecommand)
Fixed-satellite (space-to-Earth) US368
5.341 US37 US350 US398
5.341 US37 US350 US398
1432-1435
1432-1435
FIXED
Wireless Communications (27)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.341 US83
5.341 US83
5.338A 5.341 5.342
5.338A 5.341
1435-1525
1452-1492
1452-1492
MOBILE (aeronautical telemetry)
Aviation (87)
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile MOBILE 5.343
BROADCASTING 5.345
BROADCASTING 5.345
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE 5.208B 5.345
5.208B 5.345
5.341 5.342
5.341 5.344
5.341 US78

Page 32
119

1980-2010
1980-2025
NG177
FIXED
2000-2020
MOBILE
FIXED
Satellite Communications (25)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.351A
MOBILE
MOBILE-SATELLITE
5.388 5.389A 5.389B 5.389F
(Earth-to-space)
2010-2025
2010-2025
2010-2025
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
2020-2025
MOBILE 5.388A 5.388B
MOBILE
MOBILE 5.388A 5.388B
FIXED
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE
5.388
5.388 5.389C 5.389E
5.388
NG177
2025-2110
2025-2110
2025-2110
SPACE OPERATION (Earth-to-space) (space-to-space)
SPACE OPERATION
FIXED NG118
TV Auxiliary Broadcasting (74F)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) (space-to-space)
(Earth-to-space) (space-to-space)
MOBILE 5.391
Cable TV Relay (78)
FIXED
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
Local TV Transmission (101J)
MOBILE 5.391
(Earth-to-space) (space-to-space)
SPACE RESEARCH (Earth-to-space) (space-to-space)
SPACE RESEARCH
(Earth-to-space) (space-to-space)
5.391 5.392 US90 US222 US346
5.392 US90 US222 US346
5.392
US347 US393
US347 US393
2110-2120
2110-2120
2110-2120
FIXED
FIXED
Public Mobile (22)
MOBILE 5.388A 5.388B
MOBILE
Wireless Communications (27)
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space) (Earth-to-space)
Fixed Microwave (101)
5.388
US252
US252
2120-2170
2120-2160
2120-2170
2120-2200
2120-2180
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE 5.388A 5.388B
MOBILE 5.388A 5.388B
MOBILE 5.388A 5.388B
MOBILE
Mobile-satellite (space-to-Earth)
5.388
2160-2170
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
5.388
5.388 5.389C 5.389E
5.388
2170-2200
NG153 NG178
FIXED
2180-2200
MOBILE
FIXED
Satellite Communications (25)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.351A
MOBILE
MOBILE-SATELLITE
(space-to-Earth)
5.388 5.389A 5.389F
NG43
Page 36
120

Table of Frequency Allocations 2200-2655 MHz (UHF)
Page 37
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
2200-2290
2200-2290
2200-2290
SPACE OPERATION (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space)
SPACE OPERATION (space-to-Earth)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space)
(space-to-space)
FIXED
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
MOBILE 5.391
(space-to-Earth) (space-to-space)
SPACE RESEARCH (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space)
FIXED (line-of-sight only)
MOBILE (line-of-sight only including
aeronautical telemetry, but excluding
flight testing of manned aircraft) 5.391
SPACE RESEARCH (space-to-Earth)
(space-to-space)
5.392
5.392 US303
US303
2290-2300
2290-2300
2290-2300
FIXED
FIXED
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
(space-to-Earth)
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space) (space-to-Earth)
SPACE RESEARCH (deep space)
(space-to-Earth)
2300-2450
2300-2450
2300-2305
2300-2305
FIXED
FIXED
Amateur
Amateur Radio (97)
G122
MOBILE 5.384A
MOBILE 5.384A
2305-2310
2305-2310
Amateur
RADIOLOCATION
FIXED
Wireless
Radiolocation
Amateur
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Communications (27)
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur Radio (97)
Amateur
US97 G122
US97
2310-2320
2310-2320
Fixed
FIXED
Wireless
Mobile US339
MOBILE US339
Communications (27)
Radiolocation G2
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
Aviation (87)
RADIOLOCATION
US97 US327
5.396 US97 US327
2320-2345
2320-2345
Fixed
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
Satellite
Radiolocation G2
Communications (25)
US327
5.396 US327
2345-2360
2345-2360
Fixed
FIXED
Wireless
Mobile US339
MOBILE US339
Communications (27)
Radiolocation G2
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
Aviation (87)
RADIOLOCATION
US327
5.396 US327
2360-2390
2360-2390
MOBILE US276
MOBILE US276
Aviation (87)
RADIOLOCATION G2 G120
Personal Radio (95)
Fixed
US101
US101
121

3300-3400
3300-3400
3300-3400
3300-3500
3300-3500
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION US108 G2
Amateur
Private Land Mobile (90)
Amateur
Amateur
Radiolocation US108
Amateur Radio (97)
Fixed
Mobile
5.149 5.429 5.430
5.149
5.149 5.429
3400-3600
3400-3500
3400-3500
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Mobile 5.430A
Amateur
Amateur
Radiolocation
Mobile 5.431A
Mobile 5.432B
Radiolocation 5.433
Radiolocation 5.433
5.282
5.282 5.432 5.432A
US342
5.282 US342
3500-3700
3500-3600
3500-3650
3500-3600
FIXED
FIXED
RADIOLOCATION G59
Radiolocation
Private Land Mobile (90)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
AERONAUTICAL
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
RADIONAVIGATION
Radiolocation 5.433
5.433A
(ground-based) G110
5.431
Radiolocation 5.433
3600-4200
3600-3700
3600-3650
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE
Satellite
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
(space-to-Earth) US245
Communications (25)
Mobile
US245
Radiolocation
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Private Land Mobile (90)
Radiolocation 5.433
3650-3700
3650-3700
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
NG169 NG185
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.435
US109 US349
US109 US349
3700-4200
3700-4200
3700-4200
FIXED
FIXED
Satellite
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Communications (25)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
NG180
Fixed Microwave (101)
4200-4400
4200-4400
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION 5.438
AERONAUTICAL RADIONAVIGATION
Aviation (87)
5.439 5.440
US261
4400-4500
4400-4500
4400-4500
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE 5.440A
MOBILE
4500-4800
4500-4800
4500-4800
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.441
MOBILE
5.441 US245
MOBILE 5.440A
US245
4800-4990
4800-4940
4800-4940
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE 5.440A 5.442
MOBILE
Radio astronomy
US203 US342
US203 US342
4940-4990
4940-4990
FIXED
Public Safety Land Mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
(90Y)
5.149 5.339 5.443
5.339 US342 US385 G122
5.339 US342 US385

Page 40
122

Table of Frequency Allocations 10-14 GHz (SHF)
Page 47
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
10-10.45
10-10.45
10-10.45
10-10.5
10-10.45
FIXED
RADIOLOCATION
FIXED
RADIOLOCATION US108 G32
Amateur
Private Land Mobile (90)
MOBILE
Amateur
MOBILE
Radiolocation US108
Amateur Radio (97)
RADIOLOCATION
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
Amateur
5.479
5.479 5.480
5.479
5.479 US128 NG50
10.45-10.5
10.45-10.5
RADIOLOCATION
Amateur
Amateur
Amateur-satellite
Amateur-satellite
Radiolocation US108
5.481
5.479 US128
US128 NG50
10.5-10.55
10.5-10.55
10.5-10.55
FIXED
FIXED
RADIOLOCATION US59
Private Land Mobile (90)
MOBILE
MOBILE
Radiolocation
RADIOLOCATION
10.55-10.6
10.55-10.6
10.55-10.6
FIXED
FIXED
Fixed Microwave (101)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Radiolocation
10.6-10.68
10.6-10.68
10.6-10.68
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-
EARTH EXPLORATION-
FIXED
SATELLITE (passive)
SATELLITE (passive)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
FIXED US265
RADIO ASTRONOMY
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
Radiolocation
5.149 5.482 5.482A
US130 US131 US265
US130 US131
10.68-10.7
10.68-10.7
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY US74
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.340 5.483
US131 US246
10.7-11.7
10.7-11.7
10.7-11.7
10.7-11.7
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
Satellite Communications (25)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.441 5.484A
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
Fixed Microwave (101)
5.441 5.484A (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Earth) 5.441 US131 US211
5.484
NG104 NG182 NG186
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
US131 US211
11.7-12.5
11.7-12.1
11.7-12.2
11.7-12.2
11.7-12.2
FIXED
FIXED 5.486
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
Satellite Communications (25)
MOBILE except aeronautical
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Earth) 5.485 5.488 NG143
mobile
5.484A 5.488
BROADCASTING
NG183 NG187
BROADCASTING
Mobile except aeronautical mobile
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE 5.492
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
5.485
5.492
12.1-12.2
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
5.484A 5.488
5.485 5.489
5.487 5.487A
NG184
123

Table of Frequency Allocations 17.7-23.6 GHz (SHF)
Page 51
International Table
United States Table
FCC Rule Part(s)
Region 1 Table
Region 2 Table
Region 3 Table
Federal Table
Non-Federal Table
17.7-18.1
17.7-17.8
17.7-18.1
17.7-17.8
17.7-17.8
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED NG144
Satellite
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
Communications (25)
5.484A (Earth-to-space) 5.516
5.517 (Earth-to-space) 5.516
5.484A (Earth-to-space) 5.516
US271
TV Broadcast Auxiliary
MOBILE
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
MOBILE
(74F)
Mobile
Cable TV Relay (78)
Fixed Microwave (101)
5.515
US401 G117
US401
17.8-18.1
17.8-18.3
17.8-18.3
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
FIXED NG144
TV Broadcast Auxiliary
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Earth) US334 G117
(74F)
5.484A (Earth-to-space) 5.516
Cable TV Relay (78)
MOBILE
Fixed Microwave (101)
5.519
18.1-18.4
US519
US334 US519
FIXED
18.3-18.6
18.3-18.6
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.484A 5.516B (Earth-to-space) 5.520
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Satellite
MOBILE
Earth) US334 G117
NG164
Communications (25)
5.519 5.521
18.4-18.6
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.484A 5.516B
MOBILE
US334 NG144
18.6-18.8
18.6-18.8
18.6-18.8
18.6-18.8
18.6-18.8
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATEL-
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE EARTH EXPLORATION-
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE
LITE (passive)
(passive)
(passive)
SATELLITE (passive)
(passive)
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Earth) US255 US334 G117
US255 NG164
5.522B
5.516B 5.522B
5.522B
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
Space research (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
Space research (passive)
5.522A 5.522C
5.522A
5.522A
US254
US254 US334 NG144
18.8-19.3
18.8-20.2
18.8-19.3
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.516B 5.523A
Earth) US334 G117
NG165
MOBILE
US334 NG144
19.3-19.7
19.3-19.7
Satellite
FIXED
FIXED NG144
Communications (25)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) (Earth-to-space) 5.523B 5.523C 5.523D 5.523E
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
TV Broadc’t Auxiliary (74F)
MOBILE
NG166
Cable TV Relay (78)
Fixed Microwave (101)
US334
19.7-20.1
19.7-20.1
19.7-20.1
19.7-20.2
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Satellite
5.484A 5.516B
5.484A 5.516B
5.484A 5.516B
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Communications (25)
Mobile-satellite (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Mobile-satellite (space-to-Earth)
5.524
5.524 5.525 5.526 5.527 5.528 5.529 5.524
124

20.1-20.2
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.484A 5.516B
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
5.525 5.526 5.527 5.528 5.529
5.524 5.525 5.526 5.527 5.528
US334
20.2-21.2
20.2-21.2
20.2-21.2
FIXED-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
FIXED-SATELLITE
Standard frequency and time
MOBILE-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
(space-to-Earth)
signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
Standard frequency and time signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
MOBILE-SATELLITE
(space-to-Earth)
Standard frequency and time
signal-satellite (space-to-Earth)
5.524
G117
21.2-21.4
21.2-21.4
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
Fixed Microwave (101)
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
US263
21.4-22
21.4-22
21.4-22
21.4-22
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
MOBILE
MOBILE
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
BROADCASTING-SATELLITE
5.208B 5.530
5.208B 5.530
5.531
22-22.21
22-22.21
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
5.149
US342
22.21-22.5
22.21-22.5
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (passive)
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
MOBILE except aeronautical mobile
RADIO ASTRONOMY
RADIO ASTRONOMY
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
SPACE RESEARCH (passive)
5.149 5.532
US263 US342
22.5-22.55
22.5-22.55
FIXED
FIXED
MOBILE
MOBILE
US211
22.55-23.55
22.55-23.55
FIXED
FIXED
Satellite
INTER-SATELLITE 5.338A
INTER-SATELLITE US278
Communications (25)
MOBILE
MOBILE
Fixed Microwave (101)
5.149
US342
23.55-23.6
23.55-23.6
FIXED
FIXED
Fixed Microwave (101)
MOBILE
MOBILE
Page 52
125

25.5-27
25.5-27
25.5-27
EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (space-to-Earth) 5.536B
EARTH EXPLORATION-
Inter-satellite 5.536
FIXED
SATELLITE (space-to-Earth)
Standard frequency and time
INTER-SATELLITE 5.536
FIXED
signal-satellite (Earth-to-space)
MOBILE
INTER-SATELLITE 5.536
SPACE RESEARCH (space-to-Earth) 5.536C
MOBILE
Standard frequency and time signal-satellite (Earth-to-space)
SPACE RESEARCH
(space-to-Earth)
Standard frequency and time
signal-satellite (Earth-to-space)
5.536A
5.536A US258
5.536A US258
27-27.5
27-27.5
27-27.5
27-27.5
FIXED
FIXED
FIXED
Inter-satellite 5.536
INTER-SATELLITE 5.536
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
INTER-SATELLITE 5.536
MOBILE
INTER-SATELLITE 5.536 5.537
MOBILE
MOBILE
27.5-28.5
27.5-30
27.5-29.5
FIXED 5.537A
FIXED
Satellite Communications (25)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.484A 5.516B 5.539
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
Fixed Microwave (101)
MOBILE
MOBILE
5.538 5.540
28.5-29.1
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.484A 5.516B 5.523A 5.539
MOBILE
Earth exploration-satellite (Earth-to-space) 5.541
5.540
29.1-29.5
FIXED
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.516B 5.523C 5.523E 5.535A 5.539 5.541A
MOBILE
Earth exploration-satellite (Earth-to-space) 5.541
5.540
29.5-29.9
29.5-29.9
29.5-29.9
29.5-30
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
Satellite Communications (25)
5.484A 5.516B 5.539
5.484A 5.516B 5.539
5.484A 5.516B 5.539
MOBILE-SATELLITE
Earth exploration-satellite
MOBILE-SATELLITE
Earth exploration-satellite
(Earth-to-space)
(Earth-to-space) 5.541
(Earth-to-space)
(Earth-to-space) 5.541
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space)
Earth exploration-satellite
Mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space)
(Earth-to-space) 5.541
5.525 5.526 5.527 5.529 5.540
5.540 5.542
5.542
5.540 5.542
29.9-30
FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space) 5.484A 5.516B 5.539
MOBILE-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)
Earth exploration-satellite (Earth-to-space) 5.541 5.543
5.525 5.526 5.527 5.538 5.540 5.542
5.525 5.526 5.527 5.529 5.543
Page 54
126

Federal Communications Commission

FCC 12-140

UNITED STATES (US) FOOTNOTES

* * * * *
US83 In the 1432-1435 MHz band, Federal stations in the fixed and mobile services may operate
indefinitely on a primary basis at the 22 sites listed in the table below. The first 21 sites are in the United
States and the last site is in Guam (GU). All other Federal stations in the fixed and mobile services shall
operate in the band 1432-1435 MHz on a primary basis until reaccommodated in accordance with the
National Defense Authorization Act of 1999.
State
Site
North
West
Radius
AK
Fort Greely
63° 47'
145° 52'
80
AL
Redstone Arsenal
34° 35'
086° 35'
80
AZ
Fort Huachuca
31° 33'
110° 18'
80
AZ
Yuma Proving Ground
32° 29'
114° 20'
160
CA
China Lake/Edwards AFB
35° 29'
117° 16'
100
CA
Lemoore
36° 20'
119° 57'
120
FL
Eglin AFB/Ft Rucker, AL
30° 28'
086° 31'
140
FL
NAS Cecil Field
30° 13'
081° 52'
160
MD
Patuxent River
38° 17'
076° 24'
70
ME
Naval Space Operations
44° 24'
068° 01'
80
Center
MI
Alpene Range
44° 23'
083° 20'
80
MS
Camp Shelby
31° 20'
089° 18'
80
NC
MCAS Cherry Point
34° 54'
076° 53'
100
NM
White Sands Missile
32° 11'
106° 20'
160
Range/Holloman AFB
NV
NAS Fallon
39° 30'
118° 46'
100
NV
Nevada Test and Training
37° 29'
114° 14'
130
Range (NTTR)
SC
Beaufort MCAS
32° 26'
080° 40'
160
SC
Savannah River
33° 15'
081° 39'
3
UT
Utah Test and Training
40° 57'
113° 05'
160
Range/Dugway Proving
Ground, Hill AFB
VA
NAS Oceana
36° 49'
076° 01'
100
WA
NAS Whidbey Island
48° 21'
122° 39'
70
GU
NCTAMS
13° 35'
144° 51'
80
NOTE: The coordinates (North latitude and West longitude) are listed under the headings North and
West. The Guam entry under the West heading is actually 144° 51' East longitude. The operating radii
in kilometers are listed under the heading Radius.
* * * * *
US97 The following provisions shall apply in the band 2305-2320 MHz:
(a) In the sub-band 2305-2310 MHz, space-to-Earth operations are prohibited.
(b) Within 145 km of Goldstone, CA (35° 25' 33" N, 116° 53' 23" W), Wireless Communications
Service (WCS) licensees operating base stations in the band 2305-2320 MHz shall, prior to operation of
those base stations, achieve a mutually satisfactory coordination agreement with the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration (NASA).
NOTE: NASA operates a deep space facility in Goldstone in the band 2290-2300 MHz.
* * * * *
127

Federal Communications Commission

FCC 12-140

US109 The band 3650-3700 MHz is also allocated to the Federal radiolocation service on a primary
basis at the following sites: St. Inigoes, MD (38° 10' N, 76° 23' W) and Pensacola, FL (30° 21' 28'' N,
87° 16' 26'' W). The FCC shall coordinate all non-Federal operations within 80 km of these sites with
NTIA on a case-by-case basis.
* * * * *
US117 In the band 406.1-410 MHz, the following provisions shall apply:
(a) Stations in the fixed and mobile services are limited to a transmitter output power of 125 watts,
and new authorizations for stations, other than mobile stations, are subject to prior coordination by the
applicant in the following areas:
(1) Within Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, contact Spectrum Manager, Arecibo
Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612. Phone: 787-878-2612, Fax: 787-878-1861, E-mail:
prcz@naic.edu.
(2) Within 350 km of the Very Large Array (34° 04' 44" N, 107° 37' 06" W), contact Spectrum
Manager, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM
87801. Phone: 505-835-7000, Fax: 505-835-7027, E-mail: nrao-rfi@nrao.edu.
(3) Within 10 km of the Table Mountain Observatory (40° 08' 02" N, 105° 14' 40" W) and for
operations only within the sub-band 407-409 MHz, contact Radio Frequency Manager, Department of
Commerce, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305. Phone: 303-497-4619, Fax: 303-497-6982, E-mail:
frequencymanager@its.bldrdoc.gov.
(b) Non-Federal use is limited to the radio astronomy service and as provided by footnote US13.
* * * * *
US128 In the band 10-10.5 GHz, pulsed emissions are prohibited, except for weather radars on
board meteorological satellites in the sub-band 10-10.025 GHz. The amateur service, the
amateur-satellite service, and the non-Federal radiolocation service, which shall not cause harmful
interference to the Federal radiolocation service, are the only non-Federal services permitted in this band.
The non-Federal radiolocation service is limited to survey operations as specified in footnote US108.
US130 The band 10.6-10.68 GHz is also allocated on a primary basis to the radio astronomy service.
However, the radio astronomy service shall not receive protection from stations in the fixed service
which are licensed to operate in the one hundred most populous urbanized areas as defined by the 1990
U.S. Census. For the list of observatories operating in this band, see footnote US131.
US131 In the band 10.7-11.7 GHz, non-geostationary satellite orbit licensees in the fixed-satellite
service (space-to-Earth), prior to commencing operations, shall coordinate with the following radio
astronomy observatories to achieve a mutually acceptable agreement regarding the protection of the radio
telescope facilities operating in the band 10.6-10.7 GHz:
Observatory
North latitude
West longitude Elevation (in meters)
Arecibo Observatory, PR…………….….........
18° 20' 37"
66° 45' 11"
497
Green Bank Telescope (GBT), WV…..…….... 38° 25' 59"
79° 50' 23"
807
Very Large Array (VLA), Socorro, NM…...…
34° 04' 44"
107° 37' 06"
2115
Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Stations:
Brewster, WA……………………….……
48° 07' 52"
119° 41' 00"
250
Fort Davis, TX……………………….…... 30° 38' 06"
103° 56' 41"
1606
Hancock, NH………………………..........
42° 56' 01"
71° 59' 12"
296
Kitt Peak, AZ……………………….......... 31° 57' 23"
111° 36' 45"
1902
Los Alamos, NM…………………............
35° 46' 30"
106° 14' 44"
1962
Mauna Kea, HI…………….…………......
19° 48' 05"
155° 27' 20"
3763
North Liberty, IA……………………….... 41° 46' 17"
91° 34' 27"
222
Owens Valley, CA………………….......... 37° 13' 54"
118° 16' 37"
1196
Pie Town, NM………................................
34° 18' 04"
108° 07' 09"
2365
St. Croix, VI……………………………...
17° 45' 24"
64° 35' 01"
16
128

Federal Communications Commission

FCC 12-140

* * * * *
US288 In the territorial waters of the United States, the preferred frequencies for use by on-board
communication stations shall be 457.525 MHz, 457.550 MHz, 457.575 MHz and 457.600 MHz paired,
respectively, with 467.750 MHz, 467.775 MHz, 467.800 MHz and 467.825 MHz. Where needed,
equipment designed for 12.5 kHz channel spacing using also the additional frequencies 457.5375 MHz,
457.5625 MHz, 467.5375 MHz and 467.5625 MHz may be introduced for on-board communications.
The characteristics of the equipment used shall conform to those specified in Recommendation
ITU-R M.1174-2.
* * * * *

NON-FEDERAL GOVERNMENT (NG) FOOTNOTES

* * * * *
NG32 Frequencies in the bands 454.6625-454.9875 MHz and 459.6625-459.9875 MHz may be
assigned to domestic public land and mobile stations to provide a two-way air-ground public
radiotelephone service.
* * * * *
NG43 Except as permitted below, the use of the band 2180-2200 MHz is limited to the
mobile-satellite service (MSS) and ancillary terrestrial components offered in conjunction with an MSS
network, subject to the Commission's rules for ancillary terrestrial components and subject to all
applicable conditions and provisions of an MSS authorization. In the band 2180-2200 MHz, where the
receipt date of the initial application for facilities in the fixed and mobile services was prior to January
16, 1992, said facilities shall operate on a primary basis and all later-applied-for facilities shall operate on
a secondary basis to the MSS; and not later than December 9, 2013, all such facilities shall operate on a
secondary basis.
* * * * *
NG50 In the band 10-10.5 GHz, non-Federal stations in the radiolocation service shall not cause
harmful interference to the amateur service; and in the sub-band 10.45-10.5 GHz, these stations shall not
cause harmful interference to the amateur-satellite service.
* * * * *

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT (G) FOOTNOTES

* * * * *
G27 In the bands 225-328.6 MHz, 335.4-399.9 MHz, and 1350-1390 MHz, the fixed and mobile
services are limited to the military systems.
* * * * *
G117 In the bands 7.25-7.75 GHz, 7.9-8.4 GHz, 17.375-17.475 GHz, 17.6-21.2 GHz, 30-31 GHz,
33-36 GHz, 39.5-41 GHz, 43.5-45.5 GHz, and 50.4-51.4 GHz, the Federal fixed-satellite and mobile-
satellite services are limited to military systems.
* * * * *

PART 15 – RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES

3. The authority citation for Part 15 continues to read as follows:
AUTHORITY: 47 U.S.C. 154, 302a, 303, 304, 307, 336, 544a, and 549.
129

Federal Communications Commission

FCC 12-140

4. Section 15.242 is amended by revising the first sentence in paragraph (e) to read as follows:
§ 15.242 Operation in the bands 174-216 MHz and 470-668 MHz.
* * * * *
(e) The user and the installer of a biomedical telemetry device operating within the frequency range
608-614 MHz and that will be located within 32 km of the very long baseline array (VLBA) stations or
within 80 km of any of the other radio astronomy observatories noted in footnote US385 of Section 2.106
of this chapter must coordinate with, and obtain the written concurrence of, the director of the affected
radio astronomy observatory before the equipment can be installed or operated. * * *
* * * * *

PART 90 – PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES

5. The authority citation for Part 90 continues to read as follows:
AUTHORITY: Sections 4(i), 11, 303(g), 303(r), and 332(c)(7) of the Communications Act of 1934, as
amended, 47 U.S.C. 154(i), 161, 303(g), 303(r), 332(c)(7).
6. Section 90.103 is amended by revising the last sentence in paragraph (c)(21) to read as
follows:
§ 90.103 Radiolocation Service.
* * * * *
(c) * * *
* * * * *
(21) * * * Authorizations will be granted on a case-by-case basis; however, operations proposed to be
located within the zones set forth in footnote US269, §2.106 of this chapter should not expect to be
accommodated.
* * * * *
7. Section 90.1331 is amended by revising paragraph (b)(1) to read as follows:
§ 90.1331 Restrictions on the operation of base and fixed stations.
* * * * *
(b)(1) Except as specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, base and fixed stations may not be
located within 80 km of the following Federal Government radiolocation facilities:
St. Inigoes, MD—38° 10' N., 76°, 23' W.
Pensacola, FL—30° 21' 28" N., 87°, 16' 26" W.
NOTE: Licensees installing equipment in the 3650-3700 MHz band should determine if there are any
nearby Federal Government radar systems that could affect their operations. Information regarding the
location and operational characteristics of the radar systems operating adjacent to this band are provided
in NTIA TR-99-361.
* * * * *
130

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