Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel: click for press photo

Federal Communications Commission Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel believes that the future belongs to the connected. She works to promote greater opportunity, accessibility, and affordability in our communications services in order to ensure that all Americans get a fair shot at 21st century success. She believes strong communications markets can foster economic growth and security, enhance digital age opportunity, and enrich our civic life.

From fighting to protect net neutrality to ensuring access to the internet for students caught in the Homework Gap, Jessica has been a consistent champion for connecting all. She is a leader in spectrum policy, developing new ways to support wireless services from Wi-Fi to video and the internet of things. She also is responsible for developing policies to help expand the reach of broadband to schools, libraries, hospitals, and households across the country.

Named as one of POLITICO's 50 Politicos to Watch and profiled by InStyle Magazine in a series celebrating "women who show up, speak up and get things done," Jessica brings over two decades of communications policy experience and public service to the FCC. Prior to joining the agency, she served as Senior Communications Counsel for the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, under the leadership of Senator John D. Rockefeller IV and Senator Daniel Inouye. Before entering public service, Jessica practiced communications law in Washington, DC.

She is a native of Hartford, Connecticut. She is a graduate of Wesleyan University and New York University School of Law. She lives in Washington, DC with her husband and two children.

 

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Narda Jones

Chief of Staff

Narda serves as FCC Chief of Staff having joined the Chairwoman’s leadership team from the White House where she was the Director of Legislative Affairs for the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Prior to that, she was the Senior Technology Policy Advisor for the Democratic staff of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Transportation and Science. Narda started working in the U.S. Senate for Senator Maria Cantwell of Washington in 2014, after spending over a decade in senior roles in the Federal Communications Commission’s Wireline and International Bureaus. She also previously worked at the Minnesota Attorney General’s Office and the Minneapolis City Attorney’s Office. In addition, she was part of the inaugural class of the AmeriCorps Legal Fellowship program and spent her fellowship time aiding homeless families secure housing and public benefits in St. Paul, Minnesota. Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, Jones is a graduate of Wesleyan University and Brooklyn Law School.

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Deena Shetler

Deputy Chief of Staff for Administration

Deena serves as Deputy Chief of Staff for Administration. She previously served as Deputy Chief of the Office of Economics and Analytics, Deputy Managing Director, several leadership roles in the Wireline Competition Bureau, and as a Legal Advisor to Commissioner Gloria Tristani. Deena served on details to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) from 2010 to 2011 and to the Department of Justice Antitrust Division from 2016-2017. Deena joined the Commission in 1996 as an attorney in the Common Carrier Bureau. Prior to joining the FCC, she was an associate at Howrey and Simon in Washington D.C. and Los Angeles. Deena received her J.D., Order of the Coif, from University of California Los Angeles School of Law, and her B.A. from University of California San Diego.

Umair Javed

Umair Javed

Chief Counsel

Umair serves as Chairwoman Rosenworcel's Chief Counsel. From October 2017 through January 2021, he served as then-Commissioner Rosenworcel's legal advisor for wireless and international issues. Umair joined the FCC from Wiley Rein LLP, where he was an attorney in the firm's Telecom, Media, and Technology practice group. Umair also has served on U.S. delegations to treaty-writing conferences and meetings of the International Telecommunication Union and as Commissioner of the Consumer Protection Commission of Fairfax County. He graduated from the University of Virginia and received his JD from the University of Virginia School of Law.

Priscilla Delgado Argeris

Priscilla Delgado Argeris

Chief Legal Advisor

Priscilla serves as Chairwoman Rosenworcel’s Chief Legal Advisor. She joined the Chairwoman’s office from Meta Platforms, Inc. where she has focused on spectrum policy issues for the company across the globe. From 2012-2015, she previously served as then-Commissioner Rosenworcel’s Legal Advisor and Senior Legal Advisor covering wireline and wireless issues for the office during her tenure. Prior to joining the FCC, Priscilla worked at the law firm Wiley Rein, where she focused regulatory and litigation matters involving federal and state communications law. She received her undergraduate degree from Princeton University and her law degree from New York University School of Law.

D’wana Terry

D’wana Terry

Special Advisor to the Chairwoman and Acting Director of the Office of Workplace Diversity

D’wana advises the Chairwoman on work the agency can do to identify and redress inequities in its policies and programs while also continuing to serve as the Acting Director of the Office of Workplace Diversity. The Office of Workplace Diversity ensures that the provides employment opportunities for all persons regardless of race, color, sex, national origin, religion, age, disability, or sexual preference. D’wana has served in numerous senior positions at the FCC since joining the agency from private practice in 1994. Most recently, she was associate bureau chief of the Wireline Competition Bureau. She has also served as an associate bureau chief and chief of staff in both the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau and the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau and as acting deputy bureau chief of CGB. In addition, she previously served as chief of the Wireless Bureau’s Public Safety & Critical Infrastructure Division. She graduated from Lafayette College and received her JD from the University of Virginia School of Law.

Sanford Williams

Sanford Williams

Special Advisor to the Chairwoman

Sanford advises the Chairwoman on work the agency can do to identify and expand opportunities for communities that have been historically underserved. Sanford has worked in various roles at the FCC since 1999. He also worked as an attorney for Womble, Carlyle, Sandridge & Rice and taught at Augusta State University in Georgia. Mr. Williams graduated from Cornell University where he earned an undergraduate degree in operations research and industrial engineering and a Master’s in Business Administration from the Johnson School of Management. He earned his law degree from the University of Virginia School of Law where he was a member of the Virginia Law Review.

Holly Saurer

Holly Saurer

Chief of the Media Bureau, Legal Advisor to the Chairwoman

Holly joins the office from the Media Bureau, where she has held several positions, including Deputy Bureau Chief, Associate Bureau Chief, Senior Legal Advisor and Attorney-Advisor with the Media Bureau’s Policy Division. Holly has previously served as an Acting Media Advisor for Commissioners Rosenworcel and Clyburn, and an International and Consumer Affairs Legal Advisor for Chairman Wheeler. Prior to joining the Commission, Holly worked at the Washington, DC offices of Drinker Biddle & Reath and Miller & Van Eaton. Holly received her JD from American University and graduated from Syracuse University’s Newhouse School of Public Communication.

Ethan Lucarelli

Ethan Lucarelli

Legal Advisor, Wireless and International

Ethan joins the office from the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, where he served as legal and policy advisor to the Bureau Chief. Previously, Ethan was Director of Regulatory & Public Policy at Inmarsat, a global satellite communications company, and an attorney in the Telecommunications, Media, and Technology group at law firm Wiley Rein LLP. Ethan also is a Professorial Lecturer in Law at the George Washington University Law School, teaching courses in Telecommunications Law and Scholarly Writing. Ethan earned his JD with highest honors from George Washington University Law School and a Bachelor of Science in Communications from the University of Illinois.

Ramesh Nagarajan

Ramesh Nagarajan

Legal Advisor, Wireline and Enforcement

Ramesh joins the office from the Wireline Competition Bureau, where he was most recently Deputy Division Chief of the Competition Policy Division. He also served as a law clerk to United States District Judge James D. Whittemore in the Middle District of Florida. Ramesh began his legal career practicing antitrust and competition law at O'Melveny & Myers LLP. Before attending law school, he served as a Legislative Assistant to Representative Lois Capps. He is a graduate of Princeton University and Harvard Law School.

Carmen Scurato

Carmen Scurato

Legal Advisor, Consumer and Public Safety

Carmen Scurato joins the Chairwoman’s office from Free Press where she served as Associate Legal Director and Senior Counsel covering telecommunications, privacy, and technology issues. Previously, she was the Vice President of Policy and General Counsel for the National Hispanic Media Coalition, where she led a policy team focused on advancing the communication needs of the Latinx community. She has served on the FCC’s Consumer Advisory Committee, the American Library Association’s Public Policy Council, and participated in the Aspen Institute Conference on Communications Policy. Earlier in her career, Mrs. Scurato worked with the Department of Justice in both the Civil Frauds section, specializing in False Claims Act investigations, and in the Office of Legislative Affairs. A native of Puerto Rico, Mrs. Scurato received her undergraduate degree from New York University and her law degree from Villanova University.

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David Strickland

Legal Advisor, Media

David joins the office from the Enforcement Bureau, where he most recently served as Assistant Bureau Chief, managing consumer protection, privacy, and media enforcement matters. David also served as Assistant Division Chief in the International Bureau, where he worked on a variety of satellite, telecommunications policy, and spectrum-related issues. Before joining the FCC, he was an attorney in private practice, specializing in litigation and antitrust issues. David is a graduate of the University of Virginia and Harvard Law School.

Andi Roane-Wiley

Andi Roane

Confidential Assistant

Andi joins the office after serving in the offices of former Chairman Pai, former Chairman Wheeler, and Commissioner Simington. In prior FCC service, Andi served as the special assistant to the chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau. Previously, she worked as an executive assistant for more than two decades in the private sector.

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Aurelle Porter

Executive Assistant

Aurelle has worked in then-Commissioner Rosenworcel’s office since 2018 and has been at the Federal Communications Commission since 2006. During her time at the agency, she has served as Special Assistant in the Office of Legislative Affairs and as a Staff Assistant to former FCC Chairman Kevin J. Martin.

Ovonda Walker

Ovonda Walker

Executive Assistant

Ovonda has over 16 years of federal government service. Most recently, she was a Staff Assistant in Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau as well as, Commissioner Michael O’Rielly’s office at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Prior to joining the O’Rielly office, Ovonda’s federal service includes: Executive Secretary to the Deputy Inspector General for Policy and Oversight at the Department of Defense; Secretary in the Civil Rights Division at the Department of Justice; Clerk Typist/Secretary at NASA Headquarters; and Clerk Typist at the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Services. She has also worked as a federal government contractor at the FCC in the Office of Chairman Tom Wheeler; at the Federal Aviation Administration; and at the Department of Defense/Defense Information Systems Network.

February 22, 2022

March 2022 Open Meeting Agenda

Jessica Rosenworcel | Chairwoman

With a big assist from Congress, the FCC has been working non-stop to make high-speed internet and broadband-enabled services more accessible for all. Just last week, we announced that more than 10 million U.S. households have enrolled in the Commission’s Affordable Connectivity Program, the largest-ever initiative to help families and people across the country afford broadband. With our March agenda, we build on this progress in a variety of ways.

  • We’re examining digital discrimination. Your zip code shouldn’t determine your access to broadband. Internet access is a must-have for work, healthcare, school, and beyond, but some communities are experiencing unequal opportunities to subscribe to high-speed internet service. That’s why the new Bipartisan Infrastructure Law directs the Commission to prevent internet providers from engaging in “digital discrimination.” The Commission will consider a Notice of Inquiry seeking public comment on what rules the Commission should adopt to prevent digital discrimination and to ensure all people in the United States has equal access to broadband. I recently announced a cross-agency task force that will support this effort.
  • We’re facilitating the deployment of broadband infrastructure. Easy, predictable access to poles can significantly speed the deployment and lower the cost of broadband infrastructure. We will take up a rulemaking exploring ways to expedite the resolution of pole replacement disputes by establishing clear standards for when and how utilities and attachers must share in the costs of a pole replacement that is precipitated by a new attachment request.
  • We’re funding more awards for telehealth. We will consider the fourth round of awards for the Connected Care Pilot Program, helping a range of nonprofit and public health care providers connect with their patients. This final round of funding will support internet access for patients and providers, focusing on connected care for veterans, maternal health and high-risk pregnancy, public health epidemics, opioid dependency, mental health, and chronic conditions.
  • We will consider an adjudicatory matter from the Media Bureau.
  • We will consider a national security matter.

—Jessica

January 27, 2022

February Open Meeting Agenda

Jessica Rosenworcel | Chairwoman

Yesterday, the Commission announced its final round of support from our COVID-19 Telehealth Program, which has awarded nearly $450 million to enable the expanded use of telemedicine by community health centers, mental health clinics, non-profit hospital systems, and other providers across the country. With studies showing a more than 20-fold increase in the use of telemedicine since the start of the pandemic, the undeniable truth is that healthcare has changed permanently over the past two years, and telemedicine is here to stay. The Commission’s February meeting will be headlined by an effort to bolster the Commission’s support for digital health solutions as we move beyond the pandemic. Here’s everything that we’ve got lined up:

  • We’re improving access to healthcare in rural America. Reliable high-speed connectivity is critical for rural health care providers to serve patients in areas that often have limited resources and fewer doctors than urban areas. The Commission’s Rural Health Care Program provides vital support to assist rural health care providers with the costs of broadband and other communications services. The Commission will consider changes to improve the efficiency of this program’s administration and to make sure its investments are better targeted to maximize their impact.
  • We’re helping overcharged customers get the refunds they deserve. From 2018 to 2019, Aureon Network Services charged unlawfully high rates to handle interstate phone traffic in Iowa. The Commission will vote on an item that would direct Aureon to submit data that will enable the Commission to calculate the refunds it owes its customers who paid the unlawful rate.
  • We’re cleaning up our broadcast radio rules. The Commission’s current rules for full-power and translator radio stations contain a number of provisions that are redundant, outdated, or in conflict with other rules. Last July we proposed several changes to update and clean up those provisions, and this month we will finalize those changes in order to reduce any potential confusion, alleviate unnecessary burdens, and make sure our rules reflect the latest technical requirements.
  • We will also consider an item from our Enforcement Bureau.

—Jessica

January 5, 2022

January Open Meeting Agenda

Jessica Rosenworcel | Chairwoman

If its start is any indication, 2022 is going to be a busy and productive year at the FCC. We brought in New Year’s Day with the launch of the Affordable Connectivity Program—a historic $14.2 billion initiative to help millions of Americans pay for internet service—and a lot of snow in the DC area. Today, we are announcing a robust agenda for our January open meeting. Here’s what we’ve got lined up for later this month.

  • We’re arming consumers with more information to help pick their broadband provider. The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act established the aforementioned Affordable Connectivity Program, but that wasn’t the law’s only major provision to make broadband affordable. It also called for new transparency in the broadband marketplace to make sure consumers know what they’re paying for and to increase incentives for carriers to compete on price and service. As directed by the new law, the Commission will consider a proposal to establish simple-to-understand broadband labels, whereby internet providers would disclose accurate information about prices, introductory rates, data allowances, and broadband speeds.
  • We’re connecting Tribal libraries. Libraries are a vital source of internet access, but, for too long, some Tribal libraries have been shut off from E-Rate support because they didn’t meet the technical definition of a library in the Commission’s rules. We will vote on an Order to fix this problem and help get more support for broadband in Tribal communities.
  • We’re updating our political programming and record-keeping rules. The FCC has political programming and recordkeeping rules that have not been formally updated to reflect the realities of the digital age. This past August, we initiated a review of these rules for broadcast licensees, cable operators, and satellite providers, and we will be voting on updated rules that are designed to comply with statutory requirements and account for modern campaign practices.
  • We’re facilitating better use of “white space” spectrum. White space devices operate in the unlicensed airwaves between broadcast TV channels and can deliver valuable wireless services such as broadband data to rural areas. The Commission will vote to simplify our rules and provide additional regulatory certainty to white space device users, manufacturers, and database administrators. This will enable unlicensed white space devices to operate more efficiently and effectively, while protecting wireless microphone users and others from harmful interference.
  • We’re modernizing our equipment authorization rules. The FCC does its best to harmonize our equipment authorization rules with international and industry-developed standards. To keep pace with rapidly evolving technology developments, we will consider targeted updates to our rules to incorporate newly adopted standards for the testing of equipment and the accreditation of laboratories that test wireless devices.
  • We will consider an adjudicatory matter from the Media Bureau.
  • We will consider a national security item.
  • We will consider an item from our Enforcement Bureau.

—Jessica

December 30, 2021

2021 Reflections: Notes from the Chairwoman

Jessica Rosenworcel | Chairwoman

This holiday season once again may look a little different than many of us might have imagined. But with vaccines widely available in the United States, many more of us have been able to reunite with family and friends during the past year. The personal networks that have supported us through these days have been important, as have the communications networks that make it possible for so many of us to stay in touch, stay working, stay healthy, stay informed, and stay entertained.

With so much of our lives moving online, the pandemic has shown that high-speed internet service is no longer just nice-to-have, it’s need-to-have for everyone, everywhere. I’m grateful that during the past year the staff at the Federal Communications Commission have done more than just acknowledge this basic truth but have been able to stand up not one, but two historic programs to connect people across the country to the broadband that they now need for everyday life.

The new Emergency Broadband Benefit program was set up in record time and provides eligible households with discounts to pay for monthly broadband service, in addition to a one-time discount off a computer or a tablet. This effort is historic. With a $3.2 billion budget, it represents our nation’s largest-ever program to help families afford internet service. The program was authorized by Congress in December 2020. We started accepting applications in May. As of the end of this year, 9 million households facing economic hardship were benefiting from the support. That’s 9 million households that might not otherwise be online. It’s a big deal.

The new Emergency Connectivity Fund reimburses schools and libraries for the purchase of laptop and tablet computers and Wi-Fi hotspots, as well as broadband connections for students, school staff, and library patrons. For years, I’ve talked about the need to close the Homework Gap, and this program’s $7.17 billion budget makes it the largest-ever effort to bring connectivity and devices to students who lacked internet access at home. As of the end of this year, we have already committed over $3.8 billion of this funding to school and library applicants, enough to support connectivity for 10 million students. And there’s more on the way.

Our efforts to expand connectivity did not stop with these two programs. We’ve done more in the past year to expand telehealth than in any year in our history. As the impact of new variants continue to present a challenge, the FCC has announced more than $208 million to health care providers in each state, territory, and the District of Columbia through what is known as Round 2 of our COVID-19 Telehealth Program. This is on top of committing more than $350 million for the current funding year through our traditional rural healthcare program under the Communications Act and selecting more than $69 million in applications to enhance telemedicine for patients through our Connected Care Pilot Program.

While these initiatives were underway, other big efforts took place at the agency.

We kicked off a mapping initiative. For too long the agency has relied on data that overstates where broadband is across the country. This should have been addressed years ago. But the second-best time to take this on is right now. So for the first time, the agency has put serious effort into remedying this situation and improving the data used for decision-making, consistent with the requirements of the Broadband DATA Act. We have made substantial progress, with the agency already having released a mobile LTE broadband and voice coverage map that is a preview of what is to come and the kind of data we will use to support our federal, state, and Tribal and partners so we can all work together to bring broadband to 100 percent of us. Plus, we set up a first-of-its-kind consumer portal to take in information about broadband deployment—the highs and the lows—that we can use to inform our future efforts.

We stepped up our crackdown on unwanted robocalls with record enforcement actions, requiring carriers deploy new technology to authenticate calls, and setting up a database to ensure compliance. On top of this, we deployed a new tool of our own—cease and desist letters—that tell carriers facilitating illegal robocalls that they have 48 hours to knock it off or we will have all other carriers refuse their calls. We’ll use these tools and more to keep up the fight against robocalls in the coming year.

We made more room for 5G in our airwaves in order to help secure American leadership in the next generation of wireless service. To do this, we launched a successful auction of 100 megahertz of prime, mid-band spectrum in the 3.45 GHz band. This auction will benefit consumers by introducing new competition, meeting the increased demand for wireless data, and improving service to rural areas. In addition, the build-out requirements for these airwaves are stronger than any recent auction in our history, which means we’ll see them put to use in record time.

We reached beyond our atmosphere to help ensure America’s future success in communications endeavors in space. We launched a new window for low-Earth orbit broadband satellite applications, proposed updates to our rules for processing these applications, and for the first time ever, dedicated specific spectrum for the growing amount of commercial space activity.

We took 988, the new national three-digit number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, that is scheduled to go into effect in July 2022, and expanded it beyond voice calling to also support text messaging. This will make it easier for those in need to contact a crisis counselor. This is especially helpful for at-risk communities, including young people, the LGBTQ+ community, Veterans, and the deaf, hard-of-hearing, and those who have speech disabilities that affect communication.

We reinvented key advisory committees. We reestablished our Communications Security, Reliability, and Interoperability Council with a special focus on 5G network security and software vulnerabilities. For the first time, it is being co-chaired by our colleagues at the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. We set up a new Communications Equity and Diversity Council with an expanded mission to look not only media matters but also more broadly at important diversity and equity issues across the technology sector.

We also kicked off an Equal Employment Opportunity initiative to collect information about the composition of the broadcast workforce, mindful of the fact that our data show that women and people of color still only own a small number of broadcast stations across the country. We have long had an obligation to do this under the law but efforts to do so have been stalled—until now.

We also took steps to increase media transparency. When foreign governments and their agents lease time to broadcast content on our airwaves, we made clear that information should be made publicly available.

We made network security a priority. With the help of Congress, we put in place a $1.895 billion fund to remove, replace, and dispose of communications equipment and services that pose a national security threat. Plus, we have made clear that we will take action to revoke and terminate authority to provide telecommunications in the United States when a carrier presents a national security and law enforcement risk that cannot be mitigated.

Our security efforts also included work to make our communications supply chains more diverse and resilient. To help foster it, we launched the nation’s first-ever inquiry into Open Radio Access Networks and held a showcase to improve understanding of this technology. This technology will increase security, drive down costs, and help build a bigger and more competitive market for secure 5G equipment.

We turned our attention to public safety, to make sure our rules and policies help those who help us in danger. We recommitted to public safety opportunities in the 4.9 GHz band. We took concrete action to address the problem of 911 fee diversion. We held nationwide tests of the Wireless Emergency Alert System and the Emergency Alert System, and, for the first time, developed local partnerships to get better results.

We focused on network resiliency. We did something long overdue and made it possible for the agency to share critical outage information with public safety from state, federal, and Tribal authorities. In the aftermath of Hurricane Ida, we also started a broad effort to rethink network resiliency, so that the communications networks we rely on are there when we need them most.

It’s a lot! Here’s to everyone at the Commission who worked to make all of this happen during 2021 and here’s to a healthy next year with even bigger, brighter, and bolder efforts.

November 22, 2021

December Open Meeting Agenda

Jessica Rosenworcel | Chairwoman

It’s Thanksgiving week, and the FCC is heading into the holidays on a high note. Just last week, the Commission concluded the bidding on one of the highest grossing spectrum auctions in FCC history; we advanced a significant text-to-988 proposal to make it easier for people to reach the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and receive life-saving counseling; and the President signed into law a bipartisan infrastructure package that includes over $14 billion for the FCC to update and extend our broadband affordability efforts. We are looking to build on this positive momentum with our December agenda. Here’s what we’ve got lined up.

  • We’re improving emergency alerts. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) allows the President, FEMA, the National Weather Service, or state and local authorities to deliver warnings to TV viewers about dangerous weather and other imminent threats. Unfortunately, alerts sent using legacy broadcast technology have limited ability relay text, which can create disparities between the information conveyed in the audio and visual alert messages, including during nationwide tests of the system. The Commission will vote on a proposal to improve the clarity and accessibility of EAS visual messages and tests, especially for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing or are otherwise unable to access the audio message.
  • We’re promoting competition in the satellite broadband market. A new generation of low-orbit satellite systems can provide broadband services with dramatically higher speeds and lower latency than previous satellite broadband offerings. This technology could be a game-changer for connecting the hardest-to-serve rural households on the wrong side of the digital divide. This December, we will consider revisions to the spectrum sharing requirements among these satellite systems. This proposal will not only facilitate the deployment of this new technology, it will promote competition and make it easier for new competitors to enter the market.
  • We’re promoting fair and open competitive bidding in the E-Rate program. In 2021, the Commission has made historic progress in closing the Homework Gap thanks to the new Emergency Connectivity Fund, which is already supporting internet connectivity for 9 million students during the pandemic. Looking long term, the centerpiece of the Commission’s work to connect students continues to be our E-Rate program, which supports connectivity for schools and libraries. To enhance the program’s integrity and efficiency, we will consider changes to the competitive bidding process for E-Rate.

—Jessica

Broadband: With Jessica Rosenworcel

Broadband Conversations

Dedicated to amplifying the voices of women who are making a difference in our digital lives.

Broadband Conversations is dedicated to highlighting women who are making an impact on our digital lives. Each episode, Federal Communications Commission Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel will talk to women who are breaking new ground and forging new paths in technology, media, and innovation about what they're working on, what's on their minds, what they think is the next for the future. Because there are just too few, it's time to amplify these women's voices.

Episodes

#517 minutes

Justine Bateman, Writer, Producer, Director and Actress

In this episode of Broadband Conversations, Commissioner Rosenworcel chats with writer, producer, director and actress Justine Bateman. Justine also is a net neutrality activist and has been involved in the fight to preserve an open internet since the beginning. Commissioner Rosenworcel and Justine discuss net neutrality, Justine's new book, and the future of creative media.

In this episode of Broadband Conversations, Commissioner Rosenworcel chats with Iris Bohnet, Professor, Co-director of the Women and Public Policy Program, and Academic Dean of Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. Trained as a behavioral economist, Iris an award-winning author and co-directs Harvard’s Women and Public Policy Program. In addition, she is currently guiding a research project to better understand the intersection of gender and technology. The Commissioner and Professor Bohnet discuss her latest research and strategies she’s found that can help technology companies close the gender gap.

#321 minutes

Kimberly Bryant, Founder of Black Girls Code

Kimberly Bryant, the founder of Black Girls Code, joined Commissioner Rosenworcel for a conversation about how we can encourage more girls, especially girls of color, to be interested in technology and how through that work we can help close the digital divide.

#216 minutes

Maya Wiley

New School Professor of Urban Policy and Management Maya Wiley joins Commissioner Rosenworcel to discuss the importance of broadband access in both rural and urban areas, digital equity and why connectivity is now critical for individual and community success.

#114 minutes

US Senator Catherine Cortez Masto

Senator Catherine Cortez Masto talks to FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel about how we can get more girls coding, how our cities can be smarter, and why getting connected and online is essential for everyone to have a fair shot at 21st century success.