Public Safety Licensing

Preparing to License

Public safety spectrum serves the mission-critical communications needs of First Responders charged with the protection of life and property, such as police, fire fighters and Emergency Medical Service (EMS) providers.  Public safety spectrum also serves the public safety-related telecommunications needs of state, local, Tribal and territorial governments generally. This web page provides information on public safety licensing, modifications, renewals and adjudications in non-federal public safety bands (e.g. frequencies below 470 MHz, 470-512 MHz, 700 MHz, 800 MHz, 4.9 GHz and 5.9 GHz) under Part 90 of the Commission’s rules, and the microwave bands under Part 101.

Before you begin the public safety licensing process, you must have detailed information about your radio system. The information will be used by FCC-certified frequency coordinators to submit to the FCC applications for authorization under FCC Form 601 (OMB Control No. 3070-0798). Below, we list specific types of information that will facilitate the licensing process.

Frequency/ Frequency Band

The frequency band or specific frequency you want to operate on. Note, some frequency bands are shared with other licensees, such as TV and Industrial/Business licensees. In addition, some frequency bands and frequencies may require concurrence from 700 MHz and 800 MHz Regional Planning Committees to ensure adherence to regional plan guidelines. In addition, some frequencies are designated for interoperability and mutual aid purposes and may not be used for day-to-day communications. For information on specific frequency bands, refer to the Part 90 and 101 rules listed under the Public Safety Spectrum Page.

Mobile Radio Count

The number of mobile radios that will operate on the system.

Output Power/ERP

The output power of the system amplifier, as well as the effective radiated power (ERP), which is the system's power at the antenna.

Emission Designators

Information, including modulation, signal, type of information and size of the channel. This information helps determine the channel bandwidth your system will occupy.

International Coordination

For stations near the Canadian border, refer to the Industry Canada site to access Canadian licensing information. Note that the Canadian database does not show all valid stations.

Antenna Information

You must also provide the following information about your antenna:

  • Structure - The most common codes are:
    • B - Building with side mounted antenna
    • BANT - Building with antenna on top
    • MAST - Self-supported structure
    • PIPE - Pipe antenna
    • POLE - Any type of pole antenna
    • TOWER - Free standing guyed structure used for communications purposes
  • Height
  • Antenna height from ground to tip, in meters.
  • Support Structure Height

If antenna is mounted on top of a building, it is the distance from ground to the top of the building. Check with your building management company for this information.

Coordinates

All coordinates (latitude/longitude) must be referenced to the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83). Latitude and longitude must be listed in degrees, minutes and seconds.

Site Elevation

The antenna site ground elevation above sea level. This information should always be in meters.

FAA Antenna Structure Registration

Refer to ASR TOWAIR Determination to determine if your antenna needs to be registered with the FCC.

Licensing and Construction

Obtaining a Public Safety Spectrum License

Obtaining a public safety spectrum license generally entails electronically filing FCC Form 601, along with evidence of frequency coordination, in the Universal Licensing System. Below, we outline and provide a brief overview to various steps in the licensing process.

New License and License Modification Application Filing

Part 90 Services (PW, QM, YW, SG, SY, GE, GF, GP, YE, YF, YP): New applications, major modifications, and other actions which require frequency coordination are normally filed with the FCC through the recognized frequency coordinator. Frequency coordinators are FCC certified to recommend the most appropriate frequencies for applicants in the designated Part 90 radio services. Applications for new frequency assignments, changes to existing facilities or operation at temporary locations must include a showing of frequency coordination. For a list of FCC-certified coordinators, visit the Public Safety coordinators page.  Other actions such as minor modifications or administrative updates may be filed by the licensee through the Universal Licensing System (ULS). For additional information, see Applying for a New License; Modifying a License; and Administrative Updates.

Part 101 Services (MW): New applications, major modifications, and other actions which require a showing of frequency coordination can be submitted by the applicant but must be accompanied by evidence of prior coordination and a frequency coordination showing per 47 CFR § 101.103(d). Interference Protection Criteria requirements can be found in 47 CFR § 101.105. For a list of coordinators, visit the Microwave coordinators page. Other actions such as minor modifications or administrative updates may be filed by the licensee through the Universal Licensing System (ULS). For additional information, see Applying for a New License; Modifying a License; and Administrative Updates.

Operation While Application is Pending (Conditional Authorization)

You may begin operation while an application is pending for new of modified facilities under certain circumstances. Conditional authorization may be granted for up to 180 days and does not prejudice any action the Commission may take on the pending application. Conditional authority is accepted with the express understanding that such authority may be modified or canceled by the Commission at any time without hearing if, in the Commission's discretion, the need for such action arises. See 47 CFR § 90.159.

Special Temporary Authorization

You may apply for a Special Temporary Authority  to operate for up to 180 days and under certain circumstances, such as during emergency or other urgent conditions. Such requests must be filed electronically using FCC Form 601 and must contain complete details about the proposed operation and the circumstances that fully justify and necessitate the grant of STA. See  47 CFR § 1.931  for further information.

Construction and Operation

A licensee must notify the Commission that its system is constructed and placed into operation within 12 months of the date of grant or their license will automatically cancel. See 47 CFR § 90.155(a). Licensees of 700 MHz “State Licenses” are subject to substantial service requirements. See 47 CFR § 90.529

Required Notice of Construction

Notification of construction is made by filing FCC Form 601 through ULS (Purpose Code: NT). For additional information, see Construction/Coverage Requirements

Extension of Time Request

You may also request an extension of the construction period through Form 601 before the expiration of the construction period. This filing must be made within 15 days of the expiration of the applicable construction period. (See 47 CFR § 1.946(d)). You may also request an extension of the construction period through Form 601 (Purpose Code: EX) before the expiration of the construction period. (See 47 CFR § 1.946(e)). For additional information, see Construction/Coverage Requirements

Failure to File Notice of Construction

If the licensee has not filed the Required Notification or Extension of Time request, ULS will enter the license into the auto-term process. Within 30 days of the license entering the auto-term process, the licensee may file a petition for reconsideration demonstrating that the licensee timely constructed and placed into operation the license. If the licensee fails to submit the petition for reconsideration, the license automatically terminates. For additional information, see Failure to Meet Requirements and Auto Termination Process

The authority to operate ends once a license expires. If a licensee needs to continue operations after a license expires, the licensee may apply for a Special Temporary Authority (STA).

Extended Implementation

In some cases, public safety licensees may apply for extended implementation, and, if granted, up to 5 years may be authorized for constructing and placing a license into operation, and subject to reporting requirements. For list of frequency bands eligible for extended implementation, see Construction Requirements by Service and Extended Implementation.

License Term

Public safety licenses are valid for a 10-year term; see 47 CFR § 90.149.

License Renewal Application

Renewal applications must be filed no later than the expiration date of the license authorization, and no sooner than 90 days prior to the expiration date; see 47 CFR § 1.949. For additional information, see Renewing License.

Late-Filed Renewal Application

Renewal applications that are late-filed (up to, and including thirty (30) days after expiration) will be granted nunc pro tunc (as if timely-filed) if the application is otherwise sufficient under the rules and is accompanied by a request for waiver of rule 1.949

PLMR applicants who file renewal-only applications more than thirty days after the license expiration date may also request that the license be renewed nunc pro tunc, but such requests will not be routinely granted and will be subject to stricter review.  Requests to grant a late-filed application more than 30 days after expiration also must be accompanied by a request for a waiver of rule 1.949.  For further information on the renewal process, please see Public Notice DA 03-1974  (disregard the sections on manual filing, as manual filing is no longer an option).

The authority to operate ends once a license expires. If a licensee needs to continue operations while a late-filed renewal is under review, the licensee may apply for a Special Temporary Authority.

 

Eligibility

Any applicant may apply for any frequency in the pool in which the applicant establishes eligibility. Briefly, eligibility criteria depends on the frequency and frequency band.

In the below 512 MHz and 800 MHz public safety bands, eligibility is open to any territory, possession, state, city, county, town or similar governmental entity is eligible to hold authorizations in the Public Safety Pool to operate radio stations for transmission of communications essential to official activities of the licensee. 47 CFR 90.20; 47 CFR 90.603.

Regarding the 700 MHz narrowband, eligibility is statutorily defined and 47 CFR 90.523 implements the definition of “public safety services” contained in 47 U.S.C. 337(f)(1). As a general matter, state, local, Tribal and territorial governments are eligible; as well as non-governmental entities that provides services, the sole or principal purpose of which is to protect the safety of life, health, or property.

Subpart Y of part 90 contains rules for assignment of frequencies in the 4.9 GHz (4940–4990 MHz) band. Subpart M of part 90 contains rules for assignment of frequencies in the 5.9 GHz (5850–5925) MHz band.

Frequency Coordinator Codes

There are specific frequency coordinator requirements for particular frequencies. Paragraph (c) of 47 CFR 90.20 lists each frequency in the Public Safety Pool and any required frequency coordinator(s) using the following letter codes:

The letter symbol(s) listed in the Coordinator column of the frequency table in 47 CFR 90.20 specifies the frequency coordinator(s) for each frequency as follows:

  • PF—Fire Coordinator
  • PH—Highway Maintenance Coordinator
  • PM—Emergency Medical Coordinator
  • PO—Forestry-Conservation Coordinator
  • PP—Police Coordinator
  • PS—Special Emergency Coordinator
  • PX—Any Public Safety Coordinator, except the Special Emergency Coordinator

Frequencies without any coordinator specified may be coordinated by any coordinator certified in the Public Safety Pool.

Frequency Assignment Limitations

There are specific assignment limitations that govern use of particular frequency bands and frequencies. Explanation of assignment limitations appearing in the Public Safety Pool frequency is available in the table of paragraph (d) of 47 CFR 90.20.

Interoperability

The Commission’s rules define interoperability as an essential communication link within public safety and public service wireless communications systems which permits units from two or more different entities to interact with one another and to exchange information according to a prescribed method in order to achieve predictable results. See 47 CFR 90.7

Nationwide Interoperability and Mutual Aid Channels

The nationwide interoperability and mutual aid channels are listed in 47 CFR 90.20 or the VHF, UHF, 700 MHz and 800 MHz bands. Any Part 90 public safety eligible entity holding a Part 90 license may operate hand-held and vehicular mobile units on these channels without needing a separate authorization. Base stations or control stations operating on these channels must be licensed separately: Encryption may not be used on any of the interoperability or mutual aid calling channels.

Administration of 700 MHz Interoperability Channels

States are responsible for administration of the Interoperability channels in the 769–775 MHz and 799–805 MHz frequency bands. License applications for Interoperability channels in the 769–775 MHz and 799–805 MHz frequency bands must be approved by a state-level agency or organization responsible for administering state emergency communications. States may hold the licenses for Interoperability channels. States may delegate the approval process for interoperability channels to regional planning committees. See 47 CFR 90.525

Shared Use Channels

Licensees of radio stations authorized under this rule part may share the use of their facilities. Shared use of an authorized station is subject to certain conditions and limitations. Licensees authorized to operate radio systems on Public Safety Pool frequencies designated in § 90.20 may share their facilities with Federal Government entities on a non-profit, cost-shared basis. 47 CFR 90.179

Frequency Coordination

Frequency coordinators are private organizations that have been certified by the Commission to recommend the most appropriate frequencies for applicants in the designated Part 90 radio services. This frequency coordination process is intended to make more efficient use of the PLMR spectrum. In general, applications for new frequency assignments, changes to existing facilities or operation at temporary locations must include a showing of frequency coordination (See CFR 47, Section 90.175).

There are different frequency coordinators authorized for the different categories of PLMR spectrum.

 

Frequency Coordinators Below 512 MHz
 

For frequencies designated with:

  • PP = Police
  • PX = Any Public Safety, except the Special Emergency

in Section 90.20 of the FCC's rules.

Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials, Inc. (APCO)
Automated Frequency Coordination Department
351 N. Williamson Blvd
Daytona Beach, FL 32114-1112
phone: 888-272-6911
fax: 386-322-2502
email: afc@apcointl.org

For frequencies designated with:

  • PF = Fire
  • PM = Emergency Medical
  • PX = Any Public Safety, except the Special Emergency

in Section 90.20 of the FCC's rules.

International Municipal Signal Association (IMSA)
122 Baltimore Street Suite 7
Gettysburg, PA 17325
phone: 717-398-0822
phone: 855-803-1465
fax: 717-778-4237
email: michelle.fink@frequencycoordination.org

For frequencies designated with:

  • PO = Forestry-Conservation
  • PX = Any Public Safety, except the Special Emergency

in Section 90.20 of the FCC's rules.

Forestry Conservation Communications Association (FCCA)
122 Baltimore Street Suite 7
Gettysburg, PA 17325
phone: 717-398-0815
phone: 855-803-1465
fax: 717-778-4237
email: michelle.fink@frequencycoordination.org

For frequencies designated with:

  • PH = Highway Maintenance
  • PX = Any Public Safety, except the Special Emergency

in Section 90.20 of the FCC's rules.

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO)
c/o RadioSoft
194 Professional Park Drive
Clarkesville, GA  30523
phone: 888-601-3676
fax: 706-754-2745
email: aashto@radiosoft.com

For frequencies designated with:

  • PS = Special Emergency

in Section 90.20 of the FCC's rules.

Enterprise Wireless Alliance (EWA)
13221 Woodland Park Rd., Suite 410
Herndon, VA 20171
phone: 800-482-8282
fax: 703-524-1074
email: customer.service@enterprisewireless.org

Forest Industries Telecommunications (FIT)
1565 Oak Street
Eugene, Oregon 97401
phone: 541-485-8441
phone: 888-583-2929 Chicago
phone: 888-342-2929 Dallas
phone: 888-355-2929 Los Angeles
phone: 888-395-2929 Washington, DC
fax: 541-485-7556
email: license@landmobile.com

target="_blank"strong>Manufacturers Radio Frequency Advisory Committee, Inc. (MRFAC)
c/o Radiosoft
194 Professional Park Drive
Clarkesville, GA  30523
phone:800-262-9206
email: coord@mrfac.com

WIA - The Wireless Infrastructure Association
WIA - The Wireless Infrastructure Association
2111 Wilson Blvd., Suite 210
Arlington, VA 22201

phone: 703-535-7502
fax: 703-836-1608
email: don.andrew@wia.org

Utilities Telecom Council
1129 20th Street NW
Suite 350
Washington, DC 20036
phone: 202-872-0030
fax: 202-872-1331
email: spectrumservices@utc.org

< target="_blank"strong>International Municipal Signal Association (IMSA)
122 Baltimore Street Suite 7
Gettysburg, PA 17325
phone: 717-398-0822
phone: 855-803-1465
fax: 717-778-4237
email: michelle.fink@frequencycoordination.org

Hydrological Federal Frequency/NOAA National Weather Service
John Bradley
Office of Climate, Water, and Weather Services, W/OS31
1325 East-West Highway, Room 13468
Silver Spring, Maryland 20910
phone: 301-427-9360
email: hydro.radio.freq@noaa.gov or john.bradley@noaa.gov

Frequency Coordinators for the 700 MHz & 800 MHz Bands
 

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO)
c/o RadioSoft
194 Professional Park Drive
Clarkesville, GA 30523
phone: 888-601-3676
fax: 706-754-2745
email:  aashto@radiosoft.com

Association of Public Safety Communications Officials, Inc (APCO)
Automated Frequency Coordination Department
351 N. Williamson Blvd
Daytona Beach, FL 32114-1112
phone: 888-272-6911
fax: 386-322-2502
email: afc@apcointl.org

Forestry Conservation Communications Association (FCCA)
122 Baltimore Street Suite 7
Gettysburg, PA 17325
phone: 717-398-0815
phone: 855-803-1465
fax: 717-778-4237
email: michelle.fink@frequencycoordination.org

IMSA/FCCA/IAFC Frequency Coordination
122 Baltimore Street Suite 7
Gettysburg, PA 17325
phone: 717-398-0815
fax: 717-778-4237

 

 

Regional Planning Committees (RPC)

700 MHz Regional Planning

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) set aside 12 megahertz of spectrum in the 700 MHz band for use by local, regional and state public safety agencies. The Commission created Regional Planning Committees (RPCs) to establish plans to meet state and local needs, encourage innovative use of the spectrum, and accommodate new and unanticipated developments in technology and equipment. There are 55 RPCs, whose task is to create a plan for General Use in their area and submit the plan to the FCC for approval.  FCC approved 700 MHz regional plans are available in WT Docket 02-378 in the FCC’s Electronic Comment Filing System https://www.fcc.gov/ecfs/search/search-filings.

800 MHz Regional Planning

The FCC set aside six megahertz of spectrum in the 800 MHz band for exclusive use by local, regional and state public safety agencies under guidelines developed by the National Public Safety Planning Advisory Committee (NPSPAC). The 800 MHz NPSPAC spectrum is administered on a regional basis by 55 RPCs. FCC approved 800 MHz regional plans are available in various dockets in the FCC’s ECFS at https://www.fcc.gov/ecfs/search/search-filings. For a list of the 800 MHz NPSPAC regional planning dockets, see the table below. The Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau will migrate these existing regional planning dockets to new PS Docket 23-237.

Region State or Territory Docket Number
1 Alabama Gen Docket 90-280
2 Alaska PR Docket 93-81
3 Arizona PR Docket 91-143
4 Arkansas PR Docket 93-3
5 Southern California Gen Docket 89-97
6 Northern California Gen Docket 90-287
7 Colorado Gen Docket 89-452
8 New York-Metro Gen Docket 88-476
9 Florida Gen Docket 90-119
10 Georgia PR Docket 92-189
11 Hawaii PR Docket 93-80
12 Idaho PR Docket 93-149
13 Illinois PR Docket 91-228
14 Indiana Gen Docket 90-178
15 Iowa PR Docket 91-288
16 Kansas PR Docket 91-162
17 Kentucky PR Docket 91-132
18 Louisiana PR Docket 90-489
19 New England Gen Docket 90-53
20 District of Columbia, Maryland and Northern Virginia Gen Docket 90-7
21 Michigan Gen Docket 90-221
22 Minnesota Gen Docket 93-130
23 Mississippi Gen Docket 89-478
24 Missouri Gen Docket 93-131
25 Montana PR Docket 92-267
26 Nebraska Gen Docket 89-608
27 Nevada Gen Docket 92-268
28 Eastern Pennsylvania, Southern New Jersey and Delaware Gen Docket 89-573
29 New Mexico PR Docket 93-86
30 New York-Albany Gen Docket 90-394
31 North Carolina PR Docket 93-150
32 North Dakota Docket 93-77
33 Ohio PR Docket 91-258
34 Oklahoma PR Docket 93-150
35 Oregon Docket 92-269
36 Pennslyvania Gen Docket 92-274
37 South Carolina PR Docket 93-78
38 South Dakota PR Docket 93-57
39 Tennessee PR Docket 93-58
40 Texas-Dallas Gen Docket 88-549
41 Utah PR Docket 91-282
42 Virginia PR Docket 91-300
43 Washington PR Docket 91-270
44 West Virginia PR Docket 93-79
45 Wisconsin PR Docket 992-273
46 Wyoming PR Docket 91-59
47 Puerto Rico PR Docket 93-82
48 US Virgin Islands PR Docket 93-82
49 Texas-Austin PR Docket 92-190
50 Texas-El Paso PR Docket 92-286
51 Texas-Houston PR Docket 91-199
52 Texas-Lubbock PR Docket 92-1
53 Texas-San Antonio PR Docket 92-169
54 Illinois-Southern Lake Michigan Gen Docket 89-363
55 New York-Buffalo PR Docket 92-287

Best Practices

License Management

The FCC is responsible for managing and licensing the electromagnetic spectrum for commercial users and for non-commercial users including: state, county and local governments. In licensing the spectrum, the Commission promotes efficient and reliable access to the spectrum for a variety of innovative uses as well as promotes public safety and emergency response.

Wireless license records are maintained in the Universal Licensing System (ULS). FCC Licensees are responsible for keeping their license records up-to-date and meeting filing deadlines. There are options for both filing applications and searching for license and application information in the ULS. It is recommended to review your FCC licenses on an annual basis; you can use the Annual License Inventory below as a guide in reviewing your licenses.

Electronic Filing

With the exception of coordinated applications, applications must be filed electronically via the  Universal Licensing System. See Public Notice DA 21-685 for further information.

Email Addresses

The FCC no longer sends any correspondence or license authorizations by the US Postal Service, so it is imperative that licensees maintain up-to-date email addresses on their licenses to ensure that filing reminders are received. See Public Notice DA 22-65 for further information. Licensees can update their licenses at any time during the term of the license.

FCC Registration Number (FRN) Maintenance

An FRN, or FCC Registration Number, is a 10-digit number that is assigned to a business or individual registering with the FCC. This unique FRN is used to identify the registrant's business dealings with the FCC. A state/local government agency is considered a business entity and, if you are doing business with the FCC, you must register for an FRN.

The FRN along with a password is used to log into the ULS. If you already have an FRN, but do not know the password for the FRN, please visit the Commission Registration System (CORES) to reset the password (NOTE: you may be prompted to register for a Username Account prior to resetting the password.) You can also contact the FCC’s Licensing Support Center at 877-489-3201 for assistance with FRN issues.

FRNs are associated to ULS license records, and it is possible for a licensee to have multiple FRNs depending on how the licensee wants to organize their license records. For example, an entity may have multiple departments and may want a different FRN for each department. A licensee with multiple FRNs may also consolidate their licenses under one FRN by using the Associate FRN utility from within the ULS. To search for FRN information, go to the search option in CORES, and select to search by EIN (Employer Identification Number).

Annual License Inventory

Licensees should review their FCC licenses and radio systems to ensure that the licenses reflect any changes made to their license information or operating parameters within the last year. Per FCC Rule 1.947(b) licensees must notify the Commission within thirty (30) days of implementing any minor modifications. Refer to Public Notice DA 22-65 for further information.

To review all of your FCC licenses, perform a license search; select the option to search by the FRN (FCC Registration Number).

As you review your licenses please address the following questions:

  1. Were any minor changes made within the last year that are not yet reflected on your FCC licenses, such as
    • Changes to the mailing address, email address or contact information
    • Control Points changed, added or deleted
    • Locations or frequencies deleted
    • Changes to the count of mobile units

If the answer to any of these questions is “Yes” and your license does not reflect these changes, you can make the requisite minor modifications to your license by filing an Update application.  

  1. Were any technical changes made to your radio systems’ parameters within the last year that are not yet reflected on your FCC licenses, such as
    • Addition of new locations, frequencies, or emissions
    • Changes in locations
    • Changes in antenna parameters
    • Changes to power parameters (ERP, output)

If the answer to this question is “Yes,” you have made major modifications.  Updating your licenses to reflect these changes requires frequency coordination. Please contact a public safety frequency coordinator for assistance in filing the requisite modification applications. 

NOTE: Continued operation without modifying the license authorization would violate the Commission’s rules and the Communications Act of 1934, as amended.  Absent grant of a STA (Special Temporary Authorization), an entity is not authorized to operate on parameters that are not reflected on the authorization.

  1. Has the ownership or controlling interest in the licensee changed?

If so, please review FCC Rule 1.948 to determine if you need to file an Assignment of Authorization or Transfer of Control. Please contact FCC Licensing Support, or by calling 877-480-3201 for assistance with filing these applications.

  1. Is the radio system no longer being used? (Per FCC Rules 1.955(a)(3) and 1.953(d) licenses automatically terminate after a 12-month period of discontinued operations).

If so, please file a Cancellation Application.  

For information on how to reset  a password or how to create a Username for online access, please visit the Commission Registration System (CORES).

If you have any questions or need filing assistance with updating your licenses, please contact FCC Licensing Support, or by calling 877-480-3201. The Support Center is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM EST.

 

Online Filing Resources

Public Safety Spectrum

 

Description Frequency Range Radio Services Rules
Travelers Information Station (TIS) 530 kHz - 1700 kHz PW 90.242
Disaster Communications 2 MHz - 10 MHz PW, YW 90.264
Low Band 25 MHz - 50 MHz PW Part 90
Radio Call Box Operations 72 MHz - 76 MHz PW, YW 90.241
72-76 MHz Band 72-76 MHz PW, YW 90.257
VHF (Very High Frequency) 150 MHz - 174 MHz PW, YW Part 90
220 Service 220 MHz - 222 MHz QM Part 90, Subpart T
UHF (Ultra High Frequency) 450 MHz - 470 MHz PW, YW Part 90
T-Band (UHF TV Sharing) 470 MHz - 512 MHz PW, YW Part 90, Subpart L
700 MHz Broadband (FirstNet) 758-769/788-799 MHz PW  
700 MHz Narrowband 768-775/798-805 MHz SL, SG, SY Part 90, Subpart R
800 MHz NPSPAC 806-809/851-854 MHz GE, GF, YE, YF Part 90, Subpart S
800 MHz Band 809-815/854-860 MHz GE, GP, YE, YP Part 90, Subpart S
1.4 GHz Band (Telemetry) 1427 - 1431 MHz PW, YW 90.259
Shared with ISM Devices 2450 - 2483.5 MHz PW, YW 90.20(d)(73)
4.9 GHz Band 4940 MHz-4990 MHz PA Part 90, Subpart Y
5.9 GHz Band (Dedicated Short Range Communication Service, DSRCS) 5850 MHz-5925 MHz IQ Part 90, Subpart M
Signal Boosters     90.219
Police Radar   PW, YW 90.20(e)(5)
Microwave Licensing Above 900 MHz MW Part 101

Public Safety Radio Service Codes

The following radio services apply to the Public Safety pool. A complete list of ULS radio service codes is also available on the Universal Licensing System site.

Below 512 MHz

  • PW Public Safety Pool, Conventional
  • QM Non-Nationwide Public Safety/Mutual Aid, 220 MHz
  • YW Public Safety Pool, Trunked

700 MHz

  • SG Conventional Public Safety 700MHz
  • SL Public Safety 700 MHZ Band - State License
  • SP 700 MHz Public Safety Broadband Nationwide License
  • SY Trunked Public Safety 700MHz

800 MHz

  • GE Public Safety/Spec Emerg and Public Safety Ntl Plan, 806-817/851-862 MHz, Conventional (Rebanding)
  • GF Public Safety Ntl Plan, 821-824/866-869 MHz, Conv.
  • GP Public Safety/Spec Emerg, 806-821/851-866 MHz, Conv.
  • YE Public Safety/Spec Emerg and Public Safety Ntl Plan, 806-817/851-862 MHz, Trunked (Rebanding)
  • YF Public Safety Ntl Plan, 821-824/866-869 MHz, Trunked
  • YP Public Safety/Spec Emerg, 806-821/851-866 MHz, Trunked

4.9 GHz

  • PA Public Safety 4940-4990 MHz Band

5.9 GHz

  • IQ Intelligent Transportation Service (Public Safety)

Microwave

  • MW Microwave Public Safety Pool

 

 

Updated:
Thursday, October 19, 2023